Summer Reading Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN!

Weekly drawing for $100 credit. Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

More at Powell's


Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | June 18, 2014

Daniel H. Wilson: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Daniel H. Wilson



Like many writers, I'm constantly haunting coffee shops with a laptop out and my headphones on. I listen to a lot of music while I write, and songs... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$15.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
10 Local Warehouse Biography- General
15 Remote Warehouse Agriculture- Animal Husbandry

This title in other editions

Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live Off the Land

by

Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live Off the Land Cover

ISBN13: 9780393341294
ISBN10: 0393341291
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When he purchased four acres of land on Vashon Island, Kurt Timmermeister was only looking for an affordable home near the restaurants he ran in Seattle. But as he slowly settled into his new property, he became awakened to the connection between what he ate and where it came from: a hive of bees provided honey, a young cow could give fresh milk, an apple orchard allowed him to make vinegar. With refreshing honesty, Timmermeister details the initial stumbles and subsequent realities he faced as he established a profitable farm for himself. Personal yet practical, Growing a Farmer will entirely recast the way we think about our relationship to the food we consume.

Review:

"Charming....[Kurt Timmermeister] narrates his personal journey with an open, straightforward spirit." Wall Street Journal

Review:

"Half memoir, half farm guide, Kurt Timmermeister's book is perfect for anyone with agrarian fantasies." Food & Wine

Review:

"What sets this book apart is its practical, calm, confidence-inspiring tone. The message is: Farming may not be easy, but just do it." Los Angeles Times

About the Author

Kurt Timmermeister grew up in Seattle and was a successful restaurateur before moving to Vashon Island. There he transformed a rough patch of earth into Kurtwood Farms, presently a vibrant farm where he raises Jersey cows, produces farmstead cheese, and hosts weekly farm dinners composed entirely of ingredients from his tidy Vashon farm.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

jsy, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by jsy)
Kurt T tells it like it is -- shares the highs and lows of building his farm and his farming business. Great read and super information!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
twicelovedbooks, December 19, 2012 (view all comments by twicelovedbooks)
Did you ever want to give up your day job, run off and live off the land -- as a farmer? Kurt Timmermeister did and lived to write about it.
The revised title for this book should be: "Growing a Farmer: Don't Do it the Way I Did". The author's ability to point out his foibles and shortcomings endears himself to the reader. Yes, I agree with the other reviewer that Kurt should really look at the whys and wherefores more thoroughly before dismissing the project (beekeeping over-wintering, especially). However, he is probably more like Everyman, willing to take a different tack to reach another, yet similar end. I applaud him for pointing out the not-so-glamourous aspects to farming and the daily tasks, that evolve into monthly, yearly, and decades-long tasks.
And I'd so love to sit down with a glass of cider and a wedge of Kurt's cheese to enjoy the fruits of his labor with Kurt. I'm thankful for farmers like him who are doing their utmost to steward the land.


Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
illegitimi non carborundum, October 6, 2012 (view all comments by illegitimi non carborundum)
A fascinating read about a man inspired by old picture books to escape the unsatisfying travails of ordinary urban life by stumbling into an attempt at being a farmer. Written as a forthright and entertaining, sometimes humorous, account of his experiences, Mr. Timmermeister openly shares how he learned pretty much everything he knows and continues to learn about farming the hard way and on his own. I thoroughly enjoyed this book although object to the subtitle. Mr. Timmermeister never learns to live off the land as he struggles to firmly cross over the line between hobby farmer and someone who sustains himself entirely. At the point of the book's completion he was supporting himself throwing farm dinner parties selling his food in as much as he sells nostalgia for a life style slowly draining from collective memory. He also has to supply huge inputs to his farm in the form of lots of imported hay, purchasing piglets rather than raising them himself, and yearly mail ordered hives of bees. Which brings me to the part about this book that made me sad, Mr. Timmermeister fails to fully research why he is having problems with one project or another and instead gives up. He kills entire hives of bees yearly from over harvesting their honey, blames the weather and purchases more bees to kill yearly rather than searching for the reason why or even having an awareness that what he is doing is the problem. Nature seems to be able to support bees in the Northwest quite well. He excuses his evacuation from his first and only attempt at breeding hogs by finding only two unacceptable extremes of raising them; allowing sows to crush their piglets or inhumanely restraining sows to prevent them from doing so. Eventually seeing a proper method and still not returning to raising his own pigs, the problem in this case is doing sufficient research on the back end of a project rather than on the front. Mr. Timmermeister does do an incredible job of portraying the massive responsibility of land stewardship and the epic time commitment that must be afforded to farm projects such as rehabilitating the land, growing fruit trees, and relearning lost arts. This is an incredibly valuable book under the current "back to the farm" movement and an absolute must read for anyone considering doing so, it shares invaluable lessons to be learned as well mistakes to be avoided.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393341294
Author:
Timmermeister, Kurt
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Biography - General
Publication Date:
20120131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Other books you might like

  1. Bolter Idina Sackville Used Trade Paper $10.95
  2. The Same River Twice (Vintage... New Trade Paper $15.95
  3. The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates
    Used Trade Paper $6.95
  4. The Lifeboat
    Used Hardcover $7.50
  5. The Ten-Year Nap
    Used Trade Paper $3.95

Related Subjects


Biography » General
Cooking and Food » General
Engineering » Home Construction » Sustainable Living
Featured Titles » Biography
Featured Titles » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » Animal Husbandry
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » General
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » Profiles and Biographies

Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live Off the Land New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393341294 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Charming....[Kurt Timmermeister] narrates his personal journey with an open, straightforward spirit."
"Review" by , "Half memoir, half farm guide, Kurt Timmermeister's book is perfect for anyone with agrarian fantasies."
"Review" by , "What sets this book apart is its practical, calm, confidence-inspiring tone. The message is: Farming may not be easy, but just do it."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.