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My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
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25 Remote Warehouse Literary Criticism- General

This title in other editions

Greek Tragedy (Routledge Classics)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

'Two things give Kitto's classic book its enduring freshness: he pioneered the approach to Greek drama through internal artistry and thematic form, and he always wrote in lively and readable English.' - Oliver Taplin, University of Oxford, UK

Why did Aeschylus characterize differently from Sophocles? Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, available for the first time in Routledge Classics.

Kitto argues that in spite of dealing with big moral and intellectual questions, the Greek dramatist is above all an artist and the key to understanding classical Greek drama is to try and understand the tragic conception of each play. In Kitto 's words We shall ask what the dramatist is striving to say, not what in fact he does say about this or that. Through a brilliant analysis of Aeschylus 's Oresteia, the plays of Sophocles including Antigone and Oedipus Tyrannus; and Euripides 's Medea and Hecuba, Kitto skilfully conveys the enduring artistic and literary brilliance of the Greek dramatists.

H.D.F Kitto (1897 1982) was a renowned British classical scholar. He lectured at the University of Glasgow from 1920-1944 before becoming Professor of Greek at Bristol University, where he taught until 1962.

Synopsis:

a Criticism, it seems to me, can without discredit begin with whata (TM)s in the poeta (TM)s head, without inquiring how it got there.a (TM)

Why did Aeschylus characterize differently from Sophocles? Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, first published in 1936 and available for the first time in Routledge Classics.

Kitto argues that in spite of dealing with big moral and intellectual questions, the Greek dramatist is above all an artist and the key to understanding classical Greek drama is to try and understand the tragic conception of each play. In Kittoa (TM)s words a We shall ask what the dramatist is striving to say, not what in fact he does say about this or that.a (TM) Through a fascinating analysis of Aeschylusa (TM)s Oresteia, the plays of Sophocles including Antigone and Oedipus Tyrannus; and Euripidesa (TM)s Medea and Hecuba, Kitto skilfully conveys the artistic and literary brilliance of the Greek dramatists and explains why classical Greek tragedy has the power to grip the reader today as when the plays were first written and performed.

This Routledge Classics edition includes a new foreword by Edith Hall.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780415610193
Author:
Kitto, H. D. F.
Publisher:
Routledge
Subject:
Ancient - General
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Routledge Classics
Publication Date:
20110331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
516

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » General
History and Social Science » Linguistics » General
History and Social Science » World History » Ancient History
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

Greek Tragedy (Routledge Classics) New Trade Paper
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$35.50 In Stock
Product details 516 pages Routledge - English 9780415610193 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , a Criticism, it seems to me, can without discredit begin with whata (TM)s in the poeta (TM)s head, without inquiring how it got there.a (TM)

Why did Aeschylus characterize differently from Sophocles? Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, first published in 1936 and available for the first time in Routledge Classics.

Kitto argues that in spite of dealing with big moral and intellectual questions, the Greek dramatist is above all an artist and the key to understanding classical Greek drama is to try and understand the tragic conception of each play. In Kittoa (TM)s words a We shall ask what the dramatist is striving to say, not what in fact he does say about this or that.a (TM) Through a fascinating analysis of Aeschylusa (TM)s Oresteia, the plays of Sophocles including Antigone and Oedipus Tyrannus; and Euripidesa (TM)s Medea and Hecuba, Kitto skilfully conveys the artistic and literary brilliance of the Greek dramatists and explains why classical Greek tragedy has the power to grip the reader today as when the plays were first written and performed.

This Routledge Classics edition includes a new foreword by Edith Hall.

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