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25 Remote Warehouse Literary Criticism- General

Other titles in the Studies in Major Literary Authors series:

Edith Wharton's " Evolutionary Conception": Darwinian Allegory in Her Major Novels (Studies in Major Literary Authors)

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Edith Wharton's " Evolutionary Conception": Darwinian Allegory in Her Major Novels (Studies in Major Literary Authors) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The book explores the ways in which Edith Wharton's scientific interests shaped her analysis of class, affected the formal properties of her fiction, and resulted in her negative valuation of social Darwinism.

Synopsis:

Edith Wharton's Evolutionary Conception investigates Edith Wharton's engagement with evolutionary theory in The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, and The Age of Innocence. The book also examines The Descent of Man, The Fruit of the Tree, Twilight Sleep, and The Children to show that Wharton's interest in biology and sociology was central to the thematic and formal elements of her fiction. Ohler argues that Wharton depicts the complex interrelations of New York's gentry and socioeconomic elite from a perspective informed by the main concerns of evolutionary thought. Concentrating on her use of ideas she encountered in works by Darwin, Herbert Spencer, and T.H. Huxley, his readings of Wharton's major novels demonstrate the literary configuration of scientific ideas she drew on and, in some cases, disputed. R.W.B. Lewis writes that Wharton 'was passionately addicted to scientific study': this book explores the ramifications of this fact for her fictional sociobiology.

The book explores the ways in which Edith Wharton's scientific interests shaped her analysis of class, affected the formal properties of her fiction, and resulted in her negative valuation of social Darwinism.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780415977197
Author:
Ohler, Paul
Publisher:
Routledge
Subject:
History
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Women Authors
Subject:
Literature and science
Subject:
Science
Subject:
Darwin, Charles - Influence
Subject:
Wharton, Edith - Criticism and interpretation
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Series:
Studies in Major Literary Authors
Publication Date:
20060731
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
212
Dimensions:
9.02x6.32x.65 in. .96 lbs.

Related Subjects

Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

Edith Wharton's " Evolutionary Conception": Darwinian Allegory in Her Major Novels (Studies in Major Literary Authors) New Hardcover
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Product details 212 pages Routledge - English 9780415977197 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Edith Wharton's Evolutionary Conception investigates Edith Wharton's engagement with evolutionary theory in The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, and The Age of Innocence. The book also examines The Descent of Man, The Fruit of the Tree, Twilight Sleep, and The Children to show that Wharton's interest in biology and sociology was central to the thematic and formal elements of her fiction. Ohler argues that Wharton depicts the complex interrelations of New York's gentry and socioeconomic elite from a perspective informed by the main concerns of evolutionary thought. Concentrating on her use of ideas she encountered in works by Darwin, Herbert Spencer, and T.H. Huxley, his readings of Wharton's major novels demonstrate the literary configuration of scientific ideas she drew on and, in some cases, disputed. R.W.B. Lewis writes that Wharton 'was passionately addicted to scientific study': this book explores the ramifications of this fact for her fictional sociobiology.

The book explores the ways in which Edith Wharton's scientific interests shaped her analysis of class, affected the formal properties of her fiction, and resulted in her negative valuation of social Darwinism.

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