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My Losing Season: A Memoir

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My Losing Season: A Memoir Cover

 

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Publisher Comments:

chapter 1

Before First Practice

It was on the morning of October 15, 1966, that the final sea-son officially began. For a month and a half, my teammates and I had gathered in the field house to lift weights, do isometric exercises, and scrimmage with each other. Right off, I could tell our sophomores were special and were going to make our team faster, scrappier, and better than the year before. In the heat of September, there was a swiftness and feistiness to the flow of these pickup games that was missing in last year's club. My optimism about the coming season lifted perceptibly as I observed my team beat up on each other in the vagrancy of our uncoached and unmonitored scrimmages.

I could feel the adrenaline rush of excitement begin as I donned my cadet uniform in the dark, and it stayed with me as I marched to mess with R Company. I could barely concentrate on the professors' voices in my classes in Coward Hall as I faced the reality of the new season and stared at the clock with impatience. It was my fourth year at The Citadel and the fourth time October 15 had marked the beginning of basketball practice. Mel Thompson was famous for working his team hard on the first day and traditionally ran us so much that the first practice was topped off by one of us vomiting on the hardwood floor.

I made my way to the locker room early that afternoon because I wanted some time to myself to shoot around and think about what I wanted to accomplish this season. Four of my teammates were already dressed when I entered the dressing room door. The room carried the acrid fragrance of the past three seasons for me, an elixir of pure maleness with the stale smell of sweat predominant yet blended with the sharp, stinging unguents we spread on sore knees and shoulders, Right Guard deodorant spray, vats of foot powder to ward off athlete's foot, and deodorant cakes in the urinals. It was the powerful eau de cologne of the locker room. I realized that my life as a college athlete was coming to its inevitable end, but I did not know that you had to leave the fabulous odors of youth behind when you hurried out into open fields to begin life as an adult.

As I entered the room, I waved to Al Beiner, the equipment manager. He and his assistant Joe Rat Eubanks were making sure that the basketballs were all inflated properly. Carl Peterson, another assistant, had just returned with a cartful of freshly laundered towels, still warm to the touch.

The Big Day, Al said. He was reserved and serious and considered the players juvenile and frivolous. Al's presence was priestlike, efficient.

Senior year, Rat said. It all comes together for the big guy this year, right, Pat?

Joe Eubanks was the only man on campus who called me the big guy. Five feet five inches tall, he was built with the frail bones of a tree sparrow. His size humiliated him but his solicitousness to the players made him beloved in the locker room. Joe hero-worshiped the players, a rarity at The Citadel. His wide-eyed appreciation of me reminded me of the looks my younger brothers gave me. My brothers thought I was the best basketball player in the world, and I did nothing to discourage this flagrant misconception.

When I began undressing, Carl brought over a clean practice uniform and a white box containing a pair of size 91U2 Converse All Star basketball shoes

Synopsis:

In a heartwarming new memoir, the author of The Water Is Wide reflects on the place of sports in his own life, describing his love of basketball, the role of the athlete for young men searching for their own identity and place in the world, his education at the Citadel, his relationship with his coach, and his journey to best-selling writer. Reprint.

Synopsis:

PAT CONROYAMERICA’S MOST BELOVED STORYTELLERIS BACK!

“I was born to be a point guard, but not a very good one. . . .There was a time in my life when I walked through the world known to myself and others as an athlete. It was part of my own definition of who I was and certainly the part I most respected. When I was a young man, I was well-built and agile and ready for the rough and tumble of games, and athletics provided the single outlet for a repressed and preternaturally shy boy to express himself in public....I lost myself in the beauty of sport and made my family proud while passing through the silent eye of the storm that was my childhood.”

So begins Pat Conroy’s journey back to 1967 and his startling realization “that this season had been seminal and easily the most consequential of my life.” The place is the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, that now famous military college, and in memory Conroy gathers around him his team to relive their few triumphs and humiliating defeats. In a narrative that moves seamlessly between the action of the season and flashbacks into his childhood, we see the author’s love of basketball and how crucial the role of athlete is to all these young men who are struggling to find their own identity and their place in the world.

In fast-paced exhilarating games, readers will laugh in delight and cry in disappointment. But as the story continues, we gradually see the self-professed “mediocre” athlete merge into the point guard whose spirit drives the team. He rallies them to play their best while closing off the shouts of “Don’t shoot, Conroy” that come from the coach on the sidelines. For Coach Mel Thompson is to Conroy the undermining presence that his father had been throughout his childhood. And in these pages finally, heartbreakingly, we learn the truth about the Great Santini.

In My Losing Season Pat Conroy has written an American classic about young men and the bonds they form, about losing and the lessons it imparts, about finding one’s voice and one’s self in the midst of defeat. And in his trademark language, we see the young Conroy walk from his life as an athlete to the writer the world knows him to be.

From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Pat Conroy is the bestselling author of The Water is Wide, The Great Santini, The Lords of Discipline, The Prince of Tides, and Beach Music. He lives in Fripp Island, South Carolina.

Table of Contents

Point guard takes to the court: Before first practice — First practice — Auburn — Making of a point guard: First shot — Gonzaga High School — Beaufort High — Plebe year — Camp Wahoo — Return for senior year — Clemson — Green weenies — Old dominion — Point guard finds his voice: New Orleans — Tampa Invitational Tournament — Columbia Lions — Christmas break — Jacksonville to Richmond — Davidson — Furman Paladins — Annie Kate — Starving in Utopia — William and Mary — VMI — Four overtimes — East Carolina — Orlando — Lefty calls my name — Tournament — Ex-basketball players — Point guard's way of knowledge: New game.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780553898187
Subtitle:
A Memoir
Publisher:
Bantam Books
Author:
Pat Conroy
Author:
Conroy, Pat
Subject:
Basketball - College
Subject:
Basketball players
Subject:
Sports - Basketball
Subject:
Novelists, American
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography-Sports - Basketball
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography-Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Sports & Recreation-Basketball - College
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Sports - Basketball
Subject:
Sports & Recreation : Basketball - College
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Sports - General
Subject:
Sports & Recreation : Basketball - General
Subject:
Sports & Recreation : General
Subject:
College sports
Subject:
Charleston
Subject:
Failure
Subject:
Charleston (S.C.)
Subject:
Novelists, American -- 20th century.
Subject:
General Sports & Recreation
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Subject:
Biography-Sports
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Sports and Fitness-Basketball General
Subject:
Sports and Fitness-Sports General
Subject:
Sports
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20030826
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
416

Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Literary
Biography » Sports
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Basketball » General
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sports General

My Losing Season: A Memoir
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$ In Stock
Product details 416 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780553898187 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In a heartwarming new memoir, the author of The Water Is Wide reflects on the place of sports in his own life, describing his love of basketball, the role of the athlete for young men searching for their own identity and place in the world, his education at the Citadel, his relationship with his coach, and his journey to best-selling writer. Reprint.
"Synopsis" by , PAT CONROYAMERICA’S MOST BELOVED STORYTELLERIS BACK!

“I was born to be a point guard, but not a very good one. . . .There was a time in my life when I walked through the world known to myself and others as an athlete. It was part of my own definition of who I was and certainly the part I most respected. When I was a young man, I was well-built and agile and ready for the rough and tumble of games, and athletics provided the single outlet for a repressed and preternaturally shy boy to express himself in public....I lost myself in the beauty of sport and made my family proud while passing through the silent eye of the storm that was my childhood.”

So begins Pat Conroy’s journey back to 1967 and his startling realization “that this season had been seminal and easily the most consequential of my life.” The place is the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, that now famous military college, and in memory Conroy gathers around him his team to relive their few triumphs and humiliating defeats. In a narrative that moves seamlessly between the action of the season and flashbacks into his childhood, we see the author’s love of basketball and how crucial the role of athlete is to all these young men who are struggling to find their own identity and their place in the world.

In fast-paced exhilarating games, readers will laugh in delight and cry in disappointment. But as the story continues, we gradually see the self-professed “mediocre” athlete merge into the point guard whose spirit drives the team. He rallies them to play their best while closing off the shouts of “Don’t shoot, Conroy” that come from the coach on the sidelines. For Coach Mel Thompson is to Conroy the undermining presence that his father had been throughout his childhood. And in these pages finally, heartbreakingly, we learn the truth about the Great Santini.

In My Losing Season Pat Conroy has written an American classic about young men and the bonds they form, about losing and the lessons it imparts, about finding one’s voice and one’s self in the midst of defeat. And in his trademark language, we see the young Conroy walk from his life as an athlete to the writer the world knows him to be.

From the Hardcover edition.

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