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Other titles in the Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies series:

Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies #427: Prophets, Prophecy, and Prophetic Texts in Second Temple Judaism

Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies #427: Prophets, Prophecy, and Prophetic Texts in Second Temple Judaism Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The emergence of prophetic literature in Israel, of the sort represented in the Latter Prophets section of the Jewish biblical canon, is often described as the natural goal or outcome of the historical development of Israelite prophecy. However, similar prophetic traditions in similar surrounding cultures did not produce anything truly analogous to the biblical prophetic books. There is thus no inherent reason for Israelite prophecy to have developed in such a way. This book alternatively proposes that the production of this kind of prophetic literature was conditioned by the particular circumstances of the early Second Temple period, when most of it was written. To understand how this particular kind of prophetic literature flourished at this particular time, and then gave way to prophetic literature of a very different sort (i.e., apocalyptic), the phenomenon of prophetic intermediation will be considered in relation to three aspects of historical change: the world view in terms of which divine agency was imagined, the demographics of the religious community, and the sociological domain and function of the scribal elite.

Synopsis:

The emergence of prophetic literature in Israel, of the sort represented in the Latter Prophets section of the Jewish biblical canon, is often described as the natural goal or outcome of the historical development of Israelite prophecy. However, similar prophetic traditions in similar surrounding cultures did not produce anything truly analogous to the biblical prophetic books. There is thus no inherent reason for Israelite prophecy to have developed in such a way. This book alternatively proposes that the production of this kind of prophetic literature was conditioned by the particular circumstances of the early Second Temple period, when most of it was written. To understand how this particular kind of prophetic literature flourished at this particular time, and then gave way to prophetic literature of a very different sort (i.e., apocalyptic), the phenomenon of prophetic intermediation will be considered in relation to three aspects of historical change: the world view in terms of which divine agency was imagined, the demographics of the religious community, and the sociological domain and function of the scribal elite.

Synopsis:

Essays examine the work of prophets in Second Temple Judaism.

Table of Contents

MARTTI NISSINEN, University of Helsinki

Presentation Title: "The Dubious Image of Prophecy"

Abstract: In Zech 13:5 a prophet who is ashamed of his prophecies says that he is not a prophet (cf. Am 7:14). In Neh 6:14 the prophetess Noadiah and the rest of the prophet appear among those who try to prevent Nehemiah's mission. In Deuteronomy the image of prophecy is ambiguous. In these texts the designation nabi becomes a doubtful one and makes the institution of prophecy appear in dubious light. All this demonstrates that prophecy did not necessarily cease to exist in the Second Temple community but became an ideologically suspect and socially marginalized phenomenon.

 

MATTHIAS HENZE, Rice University, Houston, Texas

Presentation Title: "Reading the Prophets in the Second Temple Period: The Appeal to the Prophets in Deutero-Zechariah and Ben Sira"

Abstract: The prophets of the 6th-century were presented with the formidable challenge of addressing the unprecedented disruption and chaos of their time. Their responses include a variety of restoration themes that are characteristic of the prophetic literature of the exilic and early post-exilic period: the return from exile, the reconstitution of the Davidic monarchy, the rebuilding of Jerusalem, and the restoration of the temple cult. A few centuries later these scenarios of a restorative future became the subject of further transformation and interpretation. Several of the restoration themes reappear subsequently in the literature of the Second Temple period in a great variety of contexts, reflecting the immediate circumstances and eschatological visions of these early interpreters. The present paper is concerned with the earliest reception history of the restorative message of the 6th-century prophecy, particularly in Deutero-Zechariah and Ben Sira. Both of these authors are representatives of larger, albeit distinctly different circles of interpretive communities—the former of the apocalyptic, and the latter of the wisdom strand. Both authors appeal to the former prophets, and explicitly to their restorative promises. In Zechariah 9-14 the prophetic lore is recontextualized: hopes for a full restoration, including the glorious rebuilding of Jerusalem, now transcend the realm of history and are projected into an eschatological future (Zech 9:8; 14:11-19). By contrast, Ben Sira petitions God to "fulfill the prophecies spoken in your name" (Ben Sira 36:20) that remain valid, though unaccomplished, and calls on God to deliver Jerusalem (see also 24:33-34; 48:23-25).

 

MICHAEL H. FLOYD, Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest, Austin, Texas

Presentation Title: "Production of Prophetic Books in the Early Second Temple Period"

Abstract: The emergence of prophetic literature in Israel, of the sort represented in the Latter Prophets section of the Jewish biblical canon, is often described as the natural goal or outcome of the historical development of Israelite prophecy. However, similar prophetic traditions in similar surrounding cultures did not produce anything truly analogous to the biblical prophetic books. There is thus no inherent reason for Israelite prophecy to have developed in such a way. This essay alternatively proposes that the production of this kind of prophetic literature was conditioned by the particular circumstances of the early Second Temple period, when most of it was written. To understand how this particular kind of prophetic literature flourished at this particular time, and then gave way to prophetic literature of a very different sort (i.e., apocalyptic), the phenomenon of prophetic intermediation will be considered in relation to three aspects of historical change: the world view in terms of which divine agency was imagined, the demographics of the religious community, and the sociological domain and function of the scribal elite.

 

ARMIN LANGE, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Presentation Title: "Literary Prophecy and Oracle Collection: A Comparison Between Judah and Greece in Persian Times"

Abstract: In ancient Israel, a development from prophetic utterances to prophetic books can be observed. Often even the prophets themselves (e.g. Isaiah and Jeremiah) initiated the textualization of their oral prophecies. In turn, these early collections of prophetic utterances were edited and expanded. Later on, more prophetic literature was composed based on the resulting prophetic books. The recognition that this process of literary prophecy is itself prophetic in nature is one of the achievements of the last decades of prophetic research. Literary prophecy has even been described as a distinctive characteristic of Israelite prophecy (Jörg Jeremias). But in ancient Greece, a comparable phenomenon can be observed. In the writings of Herodotus, Plato, and Aristophanes, collections of the oracles of Greek seers (manteis) are mentioned. Like Biblical literary prophecy, these books claim to be collections of famous seers (e.g. Bakis, Glaukis, Musaios, Sibyl). Like the Biblical prophetic books the oracle books of classical Greece were edited and reworked. And like the Biblical prophetic books the oracle books of classical Greece were perceived as communicating messages which were concerned with their later audiences. In this lecture, I will ask in how far Israelite literary prophecy and Greek oracle collections are comparable and how the parallels suspected can be explained.

 

Yairah Amit, Tel Aviv University

Presentation Title: "The Role of Prophecy and Prophets in the Book of Chronicles"

Abstract: Prophe

Product Details

ISBN:
9780567027801
Other:
Society of Biblical Literature
Publisher:
Bloomsbury T & T Clark
Other:
Society of Biblical Literature
Editor:
Floyd, Michael H.
Editor:
Haak, Robert D.
Author:
Floyd, Michael H.
Author:
Haak, Robert D.
Author:
Floyd, Michael
Subject:
Judaism
Subject:
Judaism - Theology
Subject:
Bible - Criticism Interpretation - Old Testament
Subject:
Biblical Criticism & Interpretation - Old Testament
Subject:
Judaism - History - Post-
Subject:
Greek literature, hellenistic
Subject:
Christianity-Biblical Criticism
Series:
Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies
Series Volume:
427
Publication Date:
20060228
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9.27 x 6.86 x 1.04 in

Related Subjects

Religion » Christianity » Biblical Reference » Criticism
Religion » Judaism » Theology

Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies #427: Prophets, Prophecy, and Prophetic Texts in Second Temple Judaism
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Product details 336 pages T. & T. Clark Publishers, Ltd. - English 9780567027801 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The emergence of prophetic literature in Israel, of the sort represented in the Latter Prophets section of the Jewish biblical canon, is often described as the natural goal or outcome of the historical development of Israelite prophecy. However, similar prophetic traditions in similar surrounding cultures did not produce anything truly analogous to the biblical prophetic books. There is thus no inherent reason for Israelite prophecy to have developed in such a way. This book alternatively proposes that the production of this kind of prophetic literature was conditioned by the particular circumstances of the early Second Temple period, when most of it was written. To understand how this particular kind of prophetic literature flourished at this particular time, and then gave way to prophetic literature of a very different sort (i.e., apocalyptic), the phenomenon of prophetic intermediation will be considered in relation to three aspects of historical change: the world view in terms of which divine agency was imagined, the demographics of the religious community, and the sociological domain and function of the scribal elite.
"Synopsis" by , Essays examine the work of prophets in Second Temple Judaism.
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