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The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Counter Narratives The best revenge on a liar is to convince him that you believe what he said. - When we want to do something while unconsciously certain to fail, we seek advice so we can blame someone else for the failure. - It is harder to say no when you really mean it than when you don’t. Never say no twice if you mean it. - Your reputation is harmed the most by what you say to defend it. - The only objective definition of aging is when a person starts to talk about aging. - They will envy you for your success, for your wealth, for your intelligence, for your looks, for your status—but rarely for your wisdom. - Most of what they call humility is successfully disguised arrogance.

If you want people to read a book, tell them it is overrated. - You never win an argument until they attack your person. - Nothing is more permanent than “temporary” arrangements, deficits, truces, and relationships; and nothing is more temporary than “permanent” ones. - The most painful moments are not those we spend with uninteresting people; rather, they are those spent with uninteresting people trying hard to be interesting. - Hatred is love with a typo somewhere in the computer code, correctable but very hard to find. I wonder whether a bitter enemy would be jealous if he discovered that I hated someone else. - The characteristic feature of the loser is to bemoan, in general terms, mankind’s flaws, biases, contradictions, and irrationality—without exploiting them for fun and profit. - The test of whether you really liked a book is if you reread it (and how many times); the test of whether you really liked someone’s company is if you are ready to meet him again and again—the rest is spin, or that variety of sentiment now called self-esteem. - We ask “why is he rich (or poor)?” not “why isn’t he richer (or poorer)?” “why is the crisis so deep?” not “why isn’t it deeper?” Hatred is much harder to fake than love. You hear of fake love; never of fake hate. - The opposite of manliness isn’t cowardice; it’s technology. - Usually, what we call a “good listener” is someone with skillfully polished indifference. - It is the appearance of inconsistency, and not its absence, that makes people attractive. - You remember emails you sent that were not answered better than emails that you did not answer. People reserve standard compliments for those who do not threaten their pride; the others they often praise by calling “arrogant.” - Since Cato the Elder, a certain type of maturity has shown up when one starts blaming the new generation for “shallowness” and praising the previous one for its “values.” - It is as difficult to avoid bugging others with advice on how to exercise and other health matters as it is to stick to an exercise schedule. - By praising someone for his lack of defects you are also implying his lack of virtues. - When she shouts that what you did was unforgivable, she has already started to forgive you. Being unimaginative is only a problem when you are easily bored. - We call narcissistic those individuals who behave as if they were the central residents of the world; those who do exactly the same in a set of two we call lovers or, better, “blessed by love.” -

From the Hardcover edition.

Synopsis:

Presents the author's aphorism that touch on the ideas about the hubris of modern society presented in such earlier works as "The Black Swan" and "Fooled by Randomness."

Synopsis:

By the author of the modern classic The Black Swan, this collection of aphorisms and meditations expresses his major ideas in ways you least expect.

The Bed ofProcrustes takes its title from Greek mythology: the story of a man who made his visitors fit his bed to perfection by either stretching them or cutting their limbs. It represents Taleb's view of moderncivilization's hubristic side effects--modifying humans to satisfy technology, blaming reality for not fitting economic models, inventing diseases to sell drugs, defining intelligence as what can betested in a classroom, and convincing people that employment is not slavery.

Playful and irreverent, these aphorisms will surprise you by exposing self-delusions you have been living with but neverrecognized.

With a rare combination of pointed wit and potent wisdom, Taleb plows through human illusions, contrasting the classical values of courage, elegance, and erudition against the moderndiseases of nerdiness, philistinism, and phoniness.

From the Hardcover edition.

Table of Contents

Procrustes — Preludes — Counter narratives — Matters ontological — The sacred and the profane — Chance, success, happiness, and stoicism — Charming and less charming sucker problems — Theseus, or, living the Paleo life — The republic of letters — The universal and the particular — Fooled by randomness — Aesthetics — Ethics — Robustness and fragility — The ludic fallacy and domain dependence — Epistemology and subtractive knowledge — The scandal of prediction — Being a philosopher and managing to remain one — Economic life and other very vulgar subjects — The sage, the weak, and the magnificent — The implicit and the explicit — On the varieties of love and nonlove — The end — Postface.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780679643685
Subtitle:
Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Author:
Taleb, Nassim Nicholas
Author:
Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Subject:
Business & Economics : General
Subject:
Philosophy : General
Subject:
Business - General
Subject:
Business, Investing
Subject:
Business;Marketing
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Subject:
General Business & Economics
Subject:
BUS-BESTSELLER534EndCap
Subject:
Economics - General
Subject:
Self-Help : General
Subject:
Humor : General
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20101130
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
112

Related Subjects

Business » General
Business » Human Resource Management
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
Reference » Quotations Anecdotes and Proverbs

The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms
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Product details 112 pages Random House - English 9780679643685 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Presents the author's aphorism that touch on the ideas about the hubris of modern society presented in such earlier works as "The Black Swan" and "Fooled by Randomness."
"Synopsis" by , By the author of the modern classic The Black Swan, this collection of aphorisms and meditations expresses his major ideas in ways you least expect.

The Bed ofProcrustes takes its title from Greek mythology: the story of a man who made his visitors fit his bed to perfection by either stretching them or cutting their limbs. It represents Taleb's view of moderncivilization's hubristic side effects--modifying humans to satisfy technology, blaming reality for not fitting economic models, inventing diseases to sell drugs, defining intelligence as what can betested in a classroom, and convincing people that employment is not slavery.

Playful and irreverent, these aphorisms will surprise you by exposing self-delusions you have been living with but neverrecognized.

With a rare combination of pointed wit and potent wisdom, Taleb plows through human illusions, contrasting the classical values of courage, elegance, and erudition against the moderndiseases of nerdiness, philistinism, and phoniness.

From the Hardcover edition.

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