Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | April 11, 2014

Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
  1. $9.07 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$10.95
List price: $15.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Graphic Novels- Nonfiction

Maus, A Survivor's Tale II: And Here My Troubles Began

by

Maus, A Survivor's Tale II: And Here My Troubles Began Cover

ISBN13: 9780679729778
ISBN10: 0679729771
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $10.95!

 

Awards

Winner of the 1992 Pulitzer Prize

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Acclaimed as a quiet triumph and a brutally moving work of art, the first volume of Art Spiegelman's Maus introduced readers to Vladek Spiegelman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler's Europe, and his son, a cartoonist trying to come to terms with his father, his father's terrifying story, and History itself. Its form, the cartoon (the Nazis are cats, the Jews are mice), succeeds perfectly in shocking us out of any lingering sense of familiarity with the events described, approaching, as it does, the unspeakable through the diminutive.

This second volume, subtitled And Here My Troubles Began, moves us from the barracks of Auschwitz to the bungalows of the Catskills. Genuinely tragic and comic by turns, it attains a complexity of theme and precision of thought new to comics and rare in any medium. Maus ties together two powerful stories: Vladek's harrowing tale of surviving against all odds, delineating the paradox of daily life in the death camps, and the author's account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. At every level this is the ultimate survivor's tale — and that too of the children who somehow survive even the survivors.

Review:

"One of the most powerful and original memoirs to come along in recent years." The New York Times

Review:

"In part two of Maus, Art Spiegelman finishes his masterpiece....You can't help witnessing — even feeling — the act of private pain being transformed into lasting truth." The Boston Globe

Review:

"The most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust." The Wall Street Journal

Review:

"The reader...develops insights that are beyond the capacity of the characters; that is a mark of Mr. Spiegelman's mastery of narrative." New York Times Books of the Century

Review:

"[W]ill forever alter the way serious readers think of graphic narratives....Full of hard-earned humor and pathos, Maus (I and II) takes your breath away with its stunning visual style, reminding us that while we can never forget the Holocaust, we may need new ways to remember." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"The power of Spiegelman's story lies in the fine detail of the story and the fact that it is related in comic-strip form." The San Francisco Examiner

Review:

"Maus is a book that cannot be put down, truly, even to sleep. When two of the mice speak of love, you are moved; when they suffer, you weep. Slowly through this little tale comprised of suffering, humor, and life's daily trials, you are captivated by the language of an old Eastern European family, and drawn into the gentle and mesmerizing rhythm, and when you finish Maus, you are unhappy to have left that magical world..." Umberto Eco, author of The Name of the Rose

Synopsis:

***WINNER OF THE 1992 PULIZTER PRIZE***

Acclaimed as a quiet triumph and a brutally moving work of art, the first volume of Art Spiegelman's Mausintroduced readers to Vladek Spieglman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler's Europe, and his son, a cartoonist trying to come to terms with his father, his father's terrifying story, and History itself. Its form, the cartoon (the Nazis are cats, the Jews mice), succeeds perfectly in shocking us out of any lingering sense of familiarity with the events described, approaching, as it does, the unspeakable through the diminutive.

This second volume, subtitled And Here My Troubles Began, moves us from the barracks of Auschwitz to the bungalows of the Catskills. Genuinely tragic and comic by turns, it attains a complexity of theme and a precision of thought new to comics and rare in any medium. Mausties together two powerful stories: Vladek's harrowing take of survival against all odds, delineating the paradox of family life in the death camps, and the author's account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. At every level this is the ultimate survivor's tale—and that too of the children who somehow survive even the survivors.

Synopsis:

A boxed edition of the two paperback volumed of this 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrated narrative of Holocaust survival.

Maus tells the story of Vladek Spiegelman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler’s Europe, and his son, a cartoonist coming to terms with his father’s story. Maus approaches the unspeakable through the diminutive. Its form, the cartoon (the Nazis are cats, the Jews mice), shocks us out of any lingering sense of familiarity and succeeds in “drawing us closer to the bleak heart of the Holocaust” (The New York Times).

Maus is a haunting tale within a tale. Vladek’s harrowing story of survival is woven into the author’s account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. Against the backdrop of guilt brought by survival, they stage a normal life of small arguments and unhappy visits. This astonishing retelling of our century’s grisliest news is a story of survival, not only of Vladek but of the children who survive even the survivors. Maus studies the bloody pawprints of history and tracks its meaning for all of us.

About the Author

Art Spiegelman is co-founder/editor of Raw, the acclaimed magazine of avant-garde comics and graphics His work has been published in The New Yorker, the New York Times, Playboy, the Village Voice, and many other periodicals, and his drawings have been exhibited in museums and galleries here and abroad. Honors he has received for Maus include the Pulitzer Prize, a Guggenheim fellowship, and nomination for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He is also the author of the books Open Me, I'm a Dog! and Jack Cole and Plastic Man, and is the creator and editor of the Little Lit series. Mr. Spiegelman lives in New York City with his wife, Francoise Mouly, and their children, Nadja and Dashiell.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Julia Callahan, February 8, 2008 (view all comments by Julia Callahan)
The follow up to the ever amazing and re-readable Maus, this book is about the contrast between how dark humanity can be and how hopeful it can be. An amazing tale of Holocaust survival, perhaps the best piece of writing on the subject to date. It's well worth purchase and constant perusal.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(9 of 23 readers found this comment helpful)
venusinfauxfurz, January 22, 2008 (view all comments by venusinfauxfurz)
A beautiful and profound work of art. Spiegelman struggles not only with his guilt for living a life much less challenging than his father's, a Holocaust survivor, but also, in this second book, with how he deals with becoming a commercial success through his father's suffering.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(14 of 24 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780679729778
Author:
Spiegelman, Art
Publisher:
Pantheon Books
Location:
New York
Subject:
Comic books, strips, etc.
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
Jewish
Subject:
Holocaust
Subject:
Historical - Holocaust
Subject:
Holocaust survivors
Subject:
Children of Holocaust survivors
Subject:
Holocaust, jewish
Subject:
Jewish - General
Subject:
Holocaust, jewish (1939-1945)
Subject:
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Poland.
Subject:
Holocaust survivors -- United States.
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Graphic Novels
Subject:
Biography-Historical
Subject:
Religion Western-Jewish History
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Reprint ed.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Maus
Series Volume:
02
Publication Date:
September 1992
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
144
Dimensions:
9.1 x 6.48 x .4 in .75 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Berlin, Book 1: City of Stones Used Trade Paper $12.00
  2. Little Lit: It Was a Dark and Silly... Used Hardcover $14.95
  3. Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a...
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  4. Blankets: An Illustrated Novel
    Used Trade Paper $23.00
  5. Night
    Used Mass Market $2.95

Related Subjects

Biography » Historical
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » General
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Literary
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Nonfiction
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » World History » Holocaust
Religion » Judaism » History
Religion » Judaism » Holocaust
Religion » Judaism » Jewish History

Maus, A Survivor's Tale II: And Here My Troubles Began Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 144 pages Pantheon Books - English 9780679729778 Reviews:
"Review" by , "One of the most powerful and original memoirs to come along in recent years."
"Review" by , "In part two of Maus, Art Spiegelman finishes his masterpiece....You can't help witnessing — even feeling — the act of private pain being transformed into lasting truth."
"Review" by , "The most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust."
"Review" by , "The reader...develops insights that are beyond the capacity of the characters; that is a mark of Mr. Spiegelman's mastery of narrative."
"Review" by , "[W]ill forever alter the way serious readers think of graphic narratives....Full of hard-earned humor and pathos, Maus (I and II) takes your breath away with its stunning visual style, reminding us that while we can never forget the Holocaust, we may need new ways to remember."
"Review" by , "The power of Spiegelman's story lies in the fine detail of the story and the fact that it is related in comic-strip form."
"Review" by , "Maus is a book that cannot be put down, truly, even to sleep. When two of the mice speak of love, you are moved; when they suffer, you weep. Slowly through this little tale comprised of suffering, humor, and life's daily trials, you are captivated by the language of an old Eastern European family, and drawn into the gentle and mesmerizing rhythm, and when you finish Maus, you are unhappy to have left that magical world..."
"Synopsis" by , ***WINNER OF THE 1992 PULIZTER PRIZE***

Acclaimed as a quiet triumph and a brutally moving work of art, the first volume of Art Spiegelman's Mausintroduced readers to Vladek Spieglman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler's Europe, and his son, a cartoonist trying to come to terms with his father, his father's terrifying story, and History itself. Its form, the cartoon (the Nazis are cats, the Jews mice), succeeds perfectly in shocking us out of any lingering sense of familiarity with the events described, approaching, as it does, the unspeakable through the diminutive.

This second volume, subtitled And Here My Troubles Began, moves us from the barracks of Auschwitz to the bungalows of the Catskills. Genuinely tragic and comic by turns, it attains a complexity of theme and a precision of thought new to comics and rare in any medium. Mausties together two powerful stories: Vladek's harrowing take of survival against all odds, delineating the paradox of family life in the death camps, and the author's account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. At every level this is the ultimate survivor's tale—and that too of the children who somehow survive even the survivors.

"Synopsis" by , A boxed edition of the two paperback volumed of this 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrated narrative of Holocaust survival.

Maus tells the story of Vladek Spiegelman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler’s Europe, and his son, a cartoonist coming to terms with his father’s story. Maus approaches the unspeakable through the diminutive. Its form, the cartoon (the Nazis are cats, the Jews mice), shocks us out of any lingering sense of familiarity and succeeds in “drawing us closer to the bleak heart of the Holocaust” (The New York Times).

Maus is a haunting tale within a tale. Vladek’s harrowing story of survival is woven into the author’s account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. Against the backdrop of guilt brought by survival, they stage a normal life of small arguments and unhappy visits. This astonishing retelling of our century’s grisliest news is a story of survival, not only of Vladek but of the children who survive even the survivors. Maus studies the bloody pawprints of history and tracks its meaning for all of us.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.