Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Carli Davidson: IMG Puppies for Sale? Read This First



    Shake Puppies contains an almost unsettling amount of cuteness. There is a good chance after looking through its pages you will get puppy fever and... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$8.50
List price: $15.99
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Classics- General Asian

Gilgamesh: A New English Version

by

Gilgamesh: A New English Version Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A literary event — a brilliant new rendering of the oldest epic in the world by esteemed translator and bestselling author Stephen Mitchell.

Although Gilgamesh is considered one of the masterpieces of world literature, and although there have been competent scholarly translations of it, until now there has not been a version that is a superlative literary text in its own right. Stephen Mitchell's lithe, muscular rendering allows us to enter an ancient masterpiece as if for the first time, to see how startlingly beautiful, intelligent, and alive it is. His insightful introduction provides a historical, spiritual, and cultural context for this ancient epic, showing that Gilgamesh is more potent and fascinating than ever.

Gilgamesh dates from as early as 1700 BCE — a thousand years before the Iliad. Lost for almost two millennia, the eleven clay tablets on which the epic was inscribed were discovered in 1853 in the ruins of Nineveh, and the text was not deciphered and fully translated until the end of the century. When the great poet Rilke first read Gilgamesh in 1916, he was awestruck. "Gilgamesh is stupendous," he wrote. "I consider it to be among the greatest things that can happen to a person."

The epic is the story of literature's first hero — the king of Uruk in what is present-day Iraq — and his journey of self-discovery. Along the way, Gilgamesh discovers that friendship can bring peace to a whole city, that a preemptive attack on a monster may have dire consequences, and that wisdom can be found only when the quest for it is abandoned. In giving voice to grief and the fear of death, perhaps more powerfully than any book written after it, in portraying love and vulnerability and the ego's hopeless striving for immortality, the epic has become a personal testimony for millions of readers in dozens of languages.

Review:

"The acclaimed translator of the Tao Te Ching and the Bhagavad Gita now takes on the oldest book in the world. Inscribed on stone tablets a thousand years before the Iliad and the Bible and found in fragments, Gilgamesh describes the journey of the king of the city of Uruk in what is now Iraq.At the start, Gilgamesh is a young giant with gigantic wealth, power and beauty — and a boundless arrogance that leads him to oppress his people. As an answer to their pleas, the gods create Enkidu to be a double for Gilgamesh, a second self. Learning of this huge, wild man who runs with the animals, Gilgamesh dispatches a priestess to find him and tame him by seducing him. Making love with the priestess awakens Enkidu's consciousness of his true identity as a human being rather than as an animal. Enkidu is taken to the city and to Gilgamesh, who falls in love with him as a soul mate. Soon, however, Gilgamesh takes his beloved friend with him to the Cedar Forest to kill the guardian, the monster Humbaba, in defiance of the gods. Enkidu dies as a result. The overwhelming grief and fear of death that Gilgamesh suffers propels him on a quest for immortality that is as fast-paced and thrilling as a contemporary action film. In the end, Gilgamesh returns to his city. He does not become immortal in the way he thinks he wants to be, but he is able to embrace what is.Relying on existing translations (and in places where there are gaps, on his own imagination), Mitchell seeks language that is as swift and strong as the story itself. He conveys the evenhanded generosity of the original poet, who is as sympathetic toward women and monsters — and the whole range of human emotions and desires — as he is toward his heroes. This wonderful new version of the story of Gilgamesh shows how the story came to achieve literary immortality — not because it is a rare ancient artifact, but because reading it can make people in the here and now feel more completely alive. Author tour. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Stephen Mitchell's Gilgamesh is a wonderful version. It is as eloquent and nuanced as his translations of Rilke. This is certainly the best that I have seen in English." Harold Bloom

Review:

"Stephen Mitchell's fresh new rendition of mankind's oldest recorded myth is quite wonderful in its limpidity and the immediacy of its live emotions." Peter Matthiessen, author of The Snow Leopard and At Play in the Fields of the Lord

Review:

"The mysterious, sinewy surge of his verse [is] thoroughly modern, yet, in its formulaic repetitions and unfamiliar meter, an uncanny evocation of the primeval." Boston Globe

Review:

"[Mitchell] retains just enough of the strangeness of the original and its robust imagery to capture its essence, and by smoothing the fragments into a coherent narrative he highlights the work's essential themes..." Washington Post Book World

Review:

"Mitchell's version of Gilgamesh should be the standard for general and classroom readers for the foreseeable future....The 66-page introduction interprets the entire poem as a philosophical fable as well as an engaging, episodic story..." Booklist

Review:

"Here is a flowing, unbroken version that reads as effortlessly as a novel, where despite the alien landscape of gods and monsters we can discover startlingly familiar hopes, fears and lusts." New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Remarkable: a rendition that, while taking no great liberties with the text, somehow makes it available as a work of literature, rather than as a set of fragments from a vanished cosmology." Newsday

Review:

"Mitchell brings a lucid and poetic version of Gilgamesh to a literary rather than academic audience." The Observer (London)

Review:

"A powerful translation of an eerie and unsettling ancient epic... This is the most pellucid version of the epic yet to have been written in English, but what is most startling and admirable about it is the fact that Mitchell has not sacrificed a sense of the weird on the altar of readability." The Daily Telegraph (London)

Synopsis:

Finally available in paperback comes a brilliant new rendering of the oldest epic in the world by esteemed translator and bestselling author Mitchell.

Synopsis:

andlt;Iandgt;Gilgameshandlt;/Iandgt; is considered one of the masterpieces of world literature, but until now there has not been a version that is a superlative literary text in its own right.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Acclaimed by critics and scholars, Stephen Mitchell's version allows us to enter an ancient masterpiece as if for the first time, to see how startlingly beautiful, intelligent, and alive it is.

About the Author

Stephen Mitchell is widely known for his ability to make literary masterpieces thrillingly new, to step in where many have tried before and to create versions that are definitive for our time. Acclaimed by critics and scholars, his many books include the bestselling Tao Te Ching, The Gospel According to Jesus, Bhagavad Gita, The Book of Job, Meetings with the Archangel, The Frog Prince, The Selected Poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, and Loving What Is (written with his wife, Byron Katie).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743261692
Author:
Mitchell, Stephen
Publisher:
Free Press
Author:
M
Author:
itchell, Stephen
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
African
Subject:
Ancient, Classical & Medieval
Subject:
Epic poetry, Assyro-Babylonian
Subject:
Classics-Medieval and Renaissance General
Subject:
Gilgamesh epic; gilgamesh sparknotes; gilgamesh cliffs notes; gilgamesh translation; gilgamesh quotes; gilgamesh a verse narrative; gilgamesh characters; gilgamesh book; gilgamesh and enkidu; Enkidu; Humbaba; Uruk; Babylon; hero s journey; sumerian; akkad
Subject:
Gilgamesh epic; gilgamesh sparknotes; gilgamesh cliffs notes; gilgamesh translation; gilgamesh quotes; gilgamesh a verse narrative; gilgamesh characters; gilgamesh book; gilgamesh and enkidu; Enkidu; Humbaba; Uruk; Babylon; hero s journey; sumerian; akkad
Subject:
Gilgamesh epic; gilgamesh sparknotes; gilgamesh cliffs notes; gilgamesh translation; gilgamesh quotes; gilgamesh a verse narrative; gilgamesh characters; gilgamesh book; gilgamesh and enkidu; Enkidu; Humbaba; Uruk; Babylon; hero s journey; sumerian; akkad
Subject:
Gilgamesh epic; gilgamesh sparknotes; gilgamesh cliffs notes; gilgamesh translation; gilgamesh quotes; gilgamesh a verse narrative; gilgamesh characters; gilgamesh book; gilgamesh and enkidu; Enkidu; Humbaba; Uruk; Babylon; hero s journey; sumerian; akkad
Subject:
Gilgamesh epic; gilgamesh sparknotes; gilgamesh cliffs notes; gilgamesh translation; gilgamesh quotes; gilgamesh a verse narrative; gilgamesh characters; gilgamesh book; gilgamesh and enkidu; Enkidu; Humbaba; Uruk; Babylon; hero s journey; sumerian; akkad
Subject:
Gilgamesh epic; gilgamesh sparknotes; gilgamesh cliffs notes; gilgamesh translation; gilgamesh quotes; gilgamesh a verse narrative; gilgamesh characters; gilgamesh book; gilgamesh and enkidu; Enkidu; Humbaba; Uruk; Babylon; hero s journey; sumerian; akkad
Subject:
Gilgamesh epic; gilgamesh sparknotes; gilgamesh cliffs notes; gilgamesh translation; gilgamesh quotes; gilgamesh a verse narrative; gilgamesh characters; gilgamesh book; gilgamesh and enkidu; Enkidu; Humbaba; Uruk; Babylon; hero s journey; sumerian; akkad
Subject:
Gilgamesh epic; gilgamesh sparknotes; gilgamesh cliffs notes; gilgamesh translation; gilgamesh quotes; gilgamesh a verse narrative; gilgamesh characters; gilgamesh book; gilgamesh and enkidu; Enkidu; Humbaba; Uruk; Babylon; hero s journey; sumerian; akkad
Copyright:
Edition Description:
B102
Publication Date:
January 2006
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
notes; bibliography; glossary; 1-c non-b
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 9.695 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Beowulf: A New Telling
    Used Trade Paper $4.00
  2. Beowulf:a verse translation, Used Trade Paper $2.95
  3. The Enlightened Heart
    Used Trade Paper $5.50
  4. The Book of Job
    Used Trade Paper $4.50

Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Classics » General
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » General Asian
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » Gilgamesh
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » Medieval and Nordic
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » Medieval and Renaissance
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books

Gilgamesh: A New English Version Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Free Press - English 9780743261692 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The acclaimed translator of the Tao Te Ching and the Bhagavad Gita now takes on the oldest book in the world. Inscribed on stone tablets a thousand years before the Iliad and the Bible and found in fragments, Gilgamesh describes the journey of the king of the city of Uruk in what is now Iraq.At the start, Gilgamesh is a young giant with gigantic wealth, power and beauty — and a boundless arrogance that leads him to oppress his people. As an answer to their pleas, the gods create Enkidu to be a double for Gilgamesh, a second self. Learning of this huge, wild man who runs with the animals, Gilgamesh dispatches a priestess to find him and tame him by seducing him. Making love with the priestess awakens Enkidu's consciousness of his true identity as a human being rather than as an animal. Enkidu is taken to the city and to Gilgamesh, who falls in love with him as a soul mate. Soon, however, Gilgamesh takes his beloved friend with him to the Cedar Forest to kill the guardian, the monster Humbaba, in defiance of the gods. Enkidu dies as a result. The overwhelming grief and fear of death that Gilgamesh suffers propels him on a quest for immortality that is as fast-paced and thrilling as a contemporary action film. In the end, Gilgamesh returns to his city. He does not become immortal in the way he thinks he wants to be, but he is able to embrace what is.Relying on existing translations (and in places where there are gaps, on his own imagination), Mitchell seeks language that is as swift and strong as the story itself. He conveys the evenhanded generosity of the original poet, who is as sympathetic toward women and monsters — and the whole range of human emotions and desires — as he is toward his heroes. This wonderful new version of the story of Gilgamesh shows how the story came to achieve literary immortality — not because it is a rare ancient artifact, but because reading it can make people in the here and now feel more completely alive. Author tour. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Stephen Mitchell's Gilgamesh is a wonderful version. It is as eloquent and nuanced as his translations of Rilke. This is certainly the best that I have seen in English."
"Review" by , "Stephen Mitchell's fresh new rendition of mankind's oldest recorded myth is quite wonderful in its limpidity and the immediacy of its live emotions."
"Review" by , "The mysterious, sinewy surge of his verse [is] thoroughly modern, yet, in its formulaic repetitions and unfamiliar meter, an uncanny evocation of the primeval."
"Review" by , "[Mitchell] retains just enough of the strangeness of the original and its robust imagery to capture its essence, and by smoothing the fragments into a coherent narrative he highlights the work's essential themes..."
"Review" by , "Mitchell's version of Gilgamesh should be the standard for general and classroom readers for the foreseeable future....The 66-page introduction interprets the entire poem as a philosophical fable as well as an engaging, episodic story..."
"Review" by , "Here is a flowing, unbroken version that reads as effortlessly as a novel, where despite the alien landscape of gods and monsters we can discover startlingly familiar hopes, fears and lusts."
"Review" by , "Remarkable: a rendition that, while taking no great liberties with the text, somehow makes it available as a work of literature, rather than as a set of fragments from a vanished cosmology."
"Review" by , "Mitchell brings a lucid and poetic version of Gilgamesh to a literary rather than academic audience."
"Review" by , "A powerful translation of an eerie and unsettling ancient epic... This is the most pellucid version of the epic yet to have been written in English, but what is most startling and admirable about it is the fact that Mitchell has not sacrificed a sense of the weird on the altar of readability."
"Synopsis" by , Finally available in paperback comes a brilliant new rendering of the oldest epic in the world by esteemed translator and bestselling author Mitchell.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Iandgt;Gilgameshandlt;/Iandgt; is considered one of the masterpieces of world literature, but until now there has not been a version that is a superlative literary text in its own right.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Acclaimed by critics and scholars, Stephen Mitchell's version allows us to enter an ancient masterpiece as if for the first time, to see how startlingly beautiful, intelligent, and alive it is.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.