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The Madam

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The Madam Cover

ISBN13: 9780743454575
ISBN10: 074345457x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In writing The Madam, award-winning storyteller and bestselling author Julianna Baggott turns her eye to her own family history, creating a masterful novel based on the lives of her grandmother, who was raised in a house of prostitution, and her great-grandmother, who was the madam. The result is a passionate, richly detailed account of the business of lust and the human soul — gracious, corrosive, resilient.

It's 1924 in an industrial town in West Virginia. Alma works in a hosiery mill where the percussive roar of machinery has far too long muffled the engine that is her heart. When her husband decides that they should set out to find their fortune in Florida, Alma is torn. Ultimately she agrees and they leave behind their three children, a boarding house of show people, a dead vaudeville bear, and Alma's ailing mother. But their fragile marriage soon collapses. Abandoned by her husband on a Miami dock, Alma is suddenly forced to make her own way in the world. With the help of a gentle giantess and an opium-addicted prostitute, Alma reclaims her children, forging a new family, and commits herself to a life set apart from the world she knows. She chooses to run a whore house, a harvest that relies on lust and weakness of which "the world has a generous, unending supply."

As her children grow older, however, Alma's love for them becomes desperate — especially for her daughter Lettie, who, at fifteen, disappears. Alma draws on the fierce strength of the unlikely cast of women around her, and the novel careens to its shocking, redemptive, unforgettable ending.

Written in stunning, incandescent prose, The Madam is a literary page-turner that takes on brutal realities. It is a story of the unbreakable bonds between women who triumph and, more heroically, endure.

Review:

"Baggott's clear prose gives one the distinct feel of someone exorcising solemn, bitter ghosts....The result is a grimly effective work about people who live and dream at the end of a very short rope." Rodney Welch, The Washington Post Book World

Review:

"[A] tale as awesome and menacing as a hurricane....Baggott's insights...are galvanizing in their intensity and drama, and her cathartic and commanding novel is a provocative paean to unconventionality, unexpected alliances, courage, and autonomy." Donna Seaman, Booklist

Review:

"Despite its titillating theme and quirky supporting characters, this is a rather standard kitchen-sink drama....Fans of [Baggott's] readable, charming earlier novels may be mystified." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Beautifully rendered, this story is as brave and unique and full of surprises as the madam portrayed within it." Elizabeth Strout, author of Amy and Isabelle

Review:

"Julianna Baggott not only has a wonderful story to tell but she also has the voice — by turns poetic and bawdy, sober and mischievous — with which to tell it. The world of The Madam is at once sensuous and sad, hardscrabble and full of unexpected tenderness." Elizabeth Graver, author of Unravelling

Review:

"In writing a detailed and astonishing portrait of the making of a madam, Julianna Baggott has created a story about the strength of women, the way women love, the power of friendship, and how women survive the often brutal circumstances of their lives. Her prose is lit with the fire of passion; it is haunting, luminescent, and irresistible. The Madam is a tour de force of a novel, a compelling crescendo all the way to a tense and surprising end that you'll never forget." Christine Wiltz, author of The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld

Review:

"A poet has transformed a piece of history into a luminous and epic piece of literature, bringing to the page the dark and lyrical and bizarre and sexual and comical and violent and mysterious and supremely heart-breaking spectacle of wide, wild lives rendered vividly before our eyes." Antonya Nelson, author of Female Trouble

Synopsis:

Critics' favorite Julianna Baggott, national bestselling author of The Miss America Family, draws on the real life of her grandmother in this exquisitely written, sweeping epic of lust commodified and love unyielding. With her first two novels, Julianna Baggott has proven to be a stunning, lyrical new voice in American fiction, willing to startle and unnerve readers with her boldly incisive, witty, and often subversive visions of suburban dissolution. Now, in The Madam, the award-winning storyteller turns her eye toward her own family history, writing a beautiful, aching novel based on her grandmother, who was raised in a house of prostitution, and her great-grandmother who was a madam. Baggott weaves her most ambitious and emotionally bracing narrative yet, about an unforgettable woman named Alma.

It is 1924. Alma and her husband are off to find fortune in Florida, leaving behind their children at Sister Margaret's orphanage and abandoning their life in West Virginia, where the percussive roar of the mill has for too long muffled the engine that is Alma's heart. When their treasure hunt comes to naught and their fragile marriage fractures, Alma is forced to make her own way. With the aid of a gentle giantess and an opium-addled prostitute, Alma starts a whorehouse, a harvest that thrives on lust. But the Madam's heart continues to beat for her children — especially her daughter Lettie. When Lettie ensnares herself in an abusive marriage with a cop, Alma finds herself prepared to go to any length to free her. Beneath a steady mist of coal ash, five extraordinary women unite in a redemptive act of violence in hope of serving one of their own.

About the Author

Julianna Baggott has published dozens of short stories and poems in such publications as Poetry, TriQuarterly, Ms. Magazine, and Best American Poetry 2000, and has read on NPR's Talk of the Nation. She is the author of two novels, Girl Talk and The Miss America Family, and a collection of poems, This Country of Mothers. She lives in Newark, Delaware, with her husband, writer David G. W. Scott, and their three children. Visit her website at www.juliannabaggott.com.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Malcolm Campbell, January 11, 2010 (view all comments by Malcolm Campbell)
Julianna Baggott's spartan, poetic prose weaves an off-kilter and dramatic story suggested by her own family's legends. In the acknowledgments, Baggott thanks her grandmother "who was raised with show people, nuns, hustlers and whores" for sharing the the facts of a very unusual life.

It's not for us to know how truth and fiction combine in this well-told tale with its careful, yet intricate plot seasoned--some will say--with Southern Gothic flavoring, and overflowing with blunt-edged emotions and a no-nonsense view of life's trials and toil. But the atmosphere from beginning to end is relentless and cruel and deeply wonderful because Baggott loved her protagonist, and the show people, nuns, hustlers and whores enough to show their world of lint and coal dust and sex as almost sacred.

Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743454575
Author:
Baggott, Julianna
Publisher:
Atria
Location:
New York
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
West virginia
Subject:
Prostitution
Subject:
Prostitutes
Subject:
Female friendship
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
General Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st
Publication Date:
September 1, 2003
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.64x5.74x1.01 in. .85 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Madam Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Atria Books - English 9780743454575 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Baggott's clear prose gives one the distinct feel of someone exorcising solemn, bitter ghosts....The result is a grimly effective work about people who live and dream at the end of a very short rope."
"Review" by , "[A] tale as awesome and menacing as a hurricane....Baggott's insights...are galvanizing in their intensity and drama, and her cathartic and commanding novel is a provocative paean to unconventionality, unexpected alliances, courage, and autonomy."
"Review" by , "Despite its titillating theme and quirky supporting characters, this is a rather standard kitchen-sink drama....Fans of [Baggott's] readable, charming earlier novels may be mystified."
"Review" by , "Beautifully rendered, this story is as brave and unique and full of surprises as the madam portrayed within it."
"Review" by , "Julianna Baggott not only has a wonderful story to tell but she also has the voice — by turns poetic and bawdy, sober and mischievous — with which to tell it. The world of The Madam is at once sensuous and sad, hardscrabble and full of unexpected tenderness."
"Review" by , "In writing a detailed and astonishing portrait of the making of a madam, Julianna Baggott has created a story about the strength of women, the way women love, the power of friendship, and how women survive the often brutal circumstances of their lives. Her prose is lit with the fire of passion; it is haunting, luminescent, and irresistible. The Madam is a tour de force of a novel, a compelling crescendo all the way to a tense and surprising end that you'll never forget."
"Review" by , "A poet has transformed a piece of history into a luminous and epic piece of literature, bringing to the page the dark and lyrical and bizarre and sexual and comical and violent and mysterious and supremely heart-breaking spectacle of wide, wild lives rendered vividly before our eyes."
"Synopsis" by , Critics' favorite Julianna Baggott, national bestselling author of The Miss America Family, draws on the real life of her grandmother in this exquisitely written, sweeping epic of lust commodified and love unyielding. With her first two novels, Julianna Baggott has proven to be a stunning, lyrical new voice in American fiction, willing to startle and unnerve readers with her boldly incisive, witty, and often subversive visions of suburban dissolution. Now, in The Madam, the award-winning storyteller turns her eye toward her own family history, writing a beautiful, aching novel based on her grandmother, who was raised in a house of prostitution, and her great-grandmother who was a madam. Baggott weaves her most ambitious and emotionally bracing narrative yet, about an unforgettable woman named Alma.

It is 1924. Alma and her husband are off to find fortune in Florida, leaving behind their children at Sister Margaret's orphanage and abandoning their life in West Virginia, where the percussive roar of the mill has for too long muffled the engine that is Alma's heart. When their treasure hunt comes to naught and their fragile marriage fractures, Alma is forced to make her own way. With the aid of a gentle giantess and an opium-addled prostitute, Alma starts a whorehouse, a harvest that thrives on lust. But the Madam's heart continues to beat for her children — especially her daughter Lettie. When Lettie ensnares herself in an abusive marriage with a cop, Alma finds herself prepared to go to any length to free her. Beneath a steady mist of coal ash, five extraordinary women unite in a redemptive act of violence in hope of serving one of their own.

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