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2 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z

Invisible

by

Invisible Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"As usual, Auster writes in a hypnotically simple style, belying the complexity of his ideas. Invisible contends with the most fundamental question of artistic creation — why bother? Why write when we know everything we put down on the page will eventually fade away or be expunged? That Auster is still writing novels as insightful and moving as this one may be the best answer we can hope to have." Vincent Rossmeier, Rain Taxi (read the entire Rain Taxi review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of America's greatest novelists dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date.

Sinuously constructed in four interlocking parts, Paul Auster's fifteenth novel opens in New York City in the spring of 1967, when twenty-year-old Adam Walker, an aspiring poet and student at Columbia University, meets the enigmatic Frenchman Rudolf Born and his silent and seductive girfriend, Margot. Before long, Walker finds himself caught in a perverse triangle that leads to a sudden, shocking act of violence that will alter the course of his life.

Three different narrators tell the story of Invisible, a novel that travels in time from 1967 to 2007 and moves from Morningside Heights, to the Left Bank of Paris, to a remote island in the Caribbean. It is a book of youthful rage, unbridled sexual hunger, and a relentless quest for justice. With uncompromising insight, Auster takes us into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power that confirms his reputation as one of America's most spectacularly inventive writers.

Review:

"In his latest, Auster is in classic form, perhaps too perfectly satisfying the contention of his wearied protagonist: 'there is far more poetry in the world than justice.' Adam Walker, a poetry student at Columbia in the spring of 1967, is Auster's latest everyman, revealed in four parts through the diary entries of a onetime admirer, the confessions of his once-close friend, the denials of his sister and Walker's own self-made frame. With crisp, taut prose, Auster pushes the tension and his characters' peculiar self-awareness to their limits, giving Walker a fractured, knowing quality that doesn't always hold. The best moments from Walker's disparate, disturbing coming-of-age come in lush passages detailing Walker's conflicted, incestuous love life (paramount to his 'education as a human being,' but a violation of his self-made promise to live 'as an ethical human being'). As the plot moves toward a Heart of Darkness-style journey into madness, the limits of Auster's formalism become more apparent, but this study of a young poet doomed to life as a manifestation of poetry carries startling weight." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

With uncompromising insight, Auster reinvents the coming-of-age story and takes readers into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power.

Synopsis:

“One of Americas greatest novelists” dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date.

Synopsis:

“One of Americas greatest novelists” dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date

Sinuously constructed in four interlocking parts, Paul Austers fifteenth novel opens in New York City in the spring of 1967, when twenty-year-old Adam Walker, an aspiring poet and student at Columbia University, meets the enigmatic Frenchman Rudolf Born and his silent and seductive girfriend, Margot. Before long, Walker finds himself caught in a perverse triangle that leads to a sudden, shocking act of violence that will alter the course of his life.

Three different narrators tell the story of Invisible, a novel that travels in time from 1967 to 2007 and moves from Morningside Heights, to the Left Bank of Paris, to a remote island in the Caribbean. It is a book of youthful rage, unbridled sexual hunger, and a relentless quest for justice. With uncompromising insight, Auster takes us into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power that confirms his reputation as “one of Americas most spectacularly inventive writers.” 

Synopsis:

“One of Americas greatest novelists” dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date

Sinuously constructed in four interlocking parts, Paul Austers fifteenth novel opens in New York City in the spring of 1967, when twenty-year-old Adam Walker, an aspiring poet and student at Columbia University, meets the enigmatic Frenchman Rudolf Born and his silent and seductive girfriend, Margot. Before long, Walker finds himself caught in a perverse triangle that leads to a sudden, shocking act of violence that will alter the course of his life.

Three different narrators tell the story of Invisible, a novel that travels in time from 1967 to 2007 and moves from Morningside Heights, to the Left Bank of Paris, to a remote island in the Caribbean. It is a book of youthful rage, unbridled sexual hunger, and a relentless quest for justice. With uncompromising insight, Auster takes us into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power that confirms his reputation as “one of Americas most spectacularly inventive writers.” 

About the Author

Paul Auster is the bestselling author of Man in the Dark, Travels in the Scriptorium, Brooklyn Follies, and Oracle Night. I Thought My Father Was God, the NPR National Story Project anthology, which he edited, was a national bestseller. His work has been translated into thirty-five languages. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805090802
Author:
Auster, Paul
Publisher:
Macmillan Audio
Subject:
College students
Subject:
Poets
Subject:
General
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Bildungsromans
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Coming of age
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20091027
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
6 CDs; 7 hours
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in
Age Level:
Coming of Age

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Invisible Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Henry Holt & Company - English 9780805090802 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In his latest, Auster is in classic form, perhaps too perfectly satisfying the contention of his wearied protagonist: 'there is far more poetry in the world than justice.' Adam Walker, a poetry student at Columbia in the spring of 1967, is Auster's latest everyman, revealed in four parts through the diary entries of a onetime admirer, the confessions of his once-close friend, the denials of his sister and Walker's own self-made frame. With crisp, taut prose, Auster pushes the tension and his characters' peculiar self-awareness to their limits, giving Walker a fractured, knowing quality that doesn't always hold. The best moments from Walker's disparate, disturbing coming-of-age come in lush passages detailing Walker's conflicted, incestuous love life (paramount to his 'education as a human being,' but a violation of his self-made promise to live 'as an ethical human being'). As the plot moves toward a Heart of Darkness-style journey into madness, the limits of Auster's formalism become more apparent, but this study of a young poet doomed to life as a manifestation of poetry carries startling weight." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "As usual, Auster writes in a hypnotically simple style, belying the complexity of his ideas. Invisible contends with the most fundamental question of artistic creation — why bother? Why write when we know everything we put down on the page will eventually fade away or be expunged? That Auster is still writing novels as insightful and moving as this one may be the best answer we can hope to have." (read the entire Rain Taxi review)
"Synopsis" by , With uncompromising insight, Auster reinvents the coming-of-age story and takes readers into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power.
"Synopsis" by ,
“One of Americas greatest novelists” dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date.
"Synopsis" by , “One of Americas greatest novelists” dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date

Sinuously constructed in four interlocking parts, Paul Austers fifteenth novel opens in New York City in the spring of 1967, when twenty-year-old Adam Walker, an aspiring poet and student at Columbia University, meets the enigmatic Frenchman Rudolf Born and his silent and seductive girfriend, Margot. Before long, Walker finds himself caught in a perverse triangle that leads to a sudden, shocking act of violence that will alter the course of his life.

Three different narrators tell the story of Invisible, a novel that travels in time from 1967 to 2007 and moves from Morningside Heights, to the Left Bank of Paris, to a remote island in the Caribbean. It is a book of youthful rage, unbridled sexual hunger, and a relentless quest for justice. With uncompromising insight, Auster takes us into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power that confirms his reputation as “one of Americas most spectacularly inventive writers.” 

"Synopsis" by ,

“One of Americas greatest novelists” dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date

Sinuously constructed in four interlocking parts, Paul Austers fifteenth novel opens in New York City in the spring of 1967, when twenty-year-old Adam Walker, an aspiring poet and student at Columbia University, meets the enigmatic Frenchman Rudolf Born and his silent and seductive girfriend, Margot. Before long, Walker finds himself caught in a perverse triangle that leads to a sudden, shocking act of violence that will alter the course of his life.

Three different narrators tell the story of Invisible, a novel that travels in time from 1967 to 2007 and moves from Morningside Heights, to the Left Bank of Paris, to a remote island in the Caribbean. It is a book of youthful rage, unbridled sexual hunger, and a relentless quest for justice. With uncompromising insight, Auster takes us into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power that confirms his reputation as “one of Americas most spectacularly inventive writers.” 

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