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Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics

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Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

History casts Tammany Hall as shorthand for the worst of urban politics: graft, crime, and patronage personified by notoriously crooked characters. In Machine Made, journalist and historian Terry Golway—who has spent his life examining the Irish American experience—carefully dismantles these stereotypes and presents a starkly revisionist portrait, focusing on the many benefits of machine politics for marginalized and maligned American immigrants. As thousands fled the potato famine and began new lives in New York, the very question of the meaning of democracy and who would be included under its protection was at stake. Tammany’s transactional politics were at the heart of crucial social reforms—such as child labor laws, workers’ compensation, and minimum wages—and Golway demonstrates that American labor history cannot be understood without Tammany’s profound contribution. Golway’s groundbreaking work reveals the deep roots of Tammany influence, heretofore woefully overlooked.

Review:

"New York's Tammany Hall long symbolized urban corruption and boss politics, satirized memorably by cartoonist Thomas Nast and condemned by WASP 'clean' government reformers. An unjust verdict, historian and author Golway (Irish Rebel: John Devoy and America's Fight for Ireland's Freedom) argues convincingly in this headlong narrative. Gotham's classic Democratic machine, which can stand in for many others since then, was less a corrupt organization than an effective political vehicle of ethnic, especially Irish-American, aspirations. Golway's take isn't new, but never has the story been told so well or with greater strength. Yes, Tammany members and followers sometimes used strong-arm street methods and vote-buying to get their way, and New York's Irish repaid the anti-Catholicism they encountered with equally ugly anti-black racism. But Tammany, usually ably led, even by the notorious Boss Tweed, eventually put New York solidly in the Democratic camp, got Al Smith elected governor, helped elect F.D.R. president, ultimately proving so successful at integrating the city's ethic groups that, by the 1970s, it was defunct. Like many narrative histories, Golway's has no clear point of view save its basic argument. Though not unaware of debates among historians and political scientists, he simply ignores them in the interest of storytelling. A pity, for though he winningly makes his case, he doesn't broaden it out into the story of the nation's 20th-century transformation. Agent: John Wright." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A major, surprising new history of New York's most famous political machine--Tammany Hall--revealing, beyond the vice and corruption, a birthplace of progressive urban politics.

Synopsis:

For decades, history has considered Tammany Hall, New York's famous political machine, shorthand for the worst of urban politics: graft, crime, and patronage personified by notoriously corrupt characters. Infamous crooks like William "Boss" Tweed dominate traditional histories of Tammany, distorting our understanding of a critical chapter of American political history. In , historian and New York City journalist Terry Golway convincingly dismantles these stereotypes; Tammany's corruption was real, but so was its heretofore forgotten role in protecting marginalized and maligned immigrants in desperate need of a political voice.

About the Author

Terry Golway was a journalist for thirty years, writing for the New York Observer, the New York Times, and other venues. He holds a PhD in American history from Rutgers University and is currently the director of the Kean University Center for History, Politics, and Policy in New Jersey.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780871403759
Author:
Golway, Terry
Publisher:
Liveright Publishing Corporation
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
US History-General
Subject:
World History-General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20140331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
8 pages of illustrations
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
23.5 x 15.56 mm

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Americana » General
History and Social Science » Americana » New England and Mid Atlantic
History and Social Science » Americana » New York
History and Social Science » Americana » Northeast
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics Used Hardcover
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Product details 400 pages Liveright Publishing Corporation - English 9780871403759 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "New York's Tammany Hall long symbolized urban corruption and boss politics, satirized memorably by cartoonist Thomas Nast and condemned by WASP 'clean' government reformers. An unjust verdict, historian and author Golway (Irish Rebel: John Devoy and America's Fight for Ireland's Freedom) argues convincingly in this headlong narrative. Gotham's classic Democratic machine, which can stand in for many others since then, was less a corrupt organization than an effective political vehicle of ethnic, especially Irish-American, aspirations. Golway's take isn't new, but never has the story been told so well or with greater strength. Yes, Tammany members and followers sometimes used strong-arm street methods and vote-buying to get their way, and New York's Irish repaid the anti-Catholicism they encountered with equally ugly anti-black racism. But Tammany, usually ably led, even by the notorious Boss Tweed, eventually put New York solidly in the Democratic camp, got Al Smith elected governor, helped elect F.D.R. president, ultimately proving so successful at integrating the city's ethic groups that, by the 1970s, it was defunct. Like many narrative histories, Golway's has no clear point of view save its basic argument. Though not unaware of debates among historians and political scientists, he simply ignores them in the interest of storytelling. A pity, for though he winningly makes his case, he doesn't broaden it out into the story of the nation's 20th-century transformation. Agent: John Wright." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A major, surprising new history of New York's most famous political machine--Tammany Hall--revealing, beyond the vice and corruption, a birthplace of progressive urban politics.
"Synopsis" by , For decades, history has considered Tammany Hall, New York's famous political machine, shorthand for the worst of urban politics: graft, crime, and patronage personified by notoriously corrupt characters. Infamous crooks like William "Boss" Tweed dominate traditional histories of Tammany, distorting our understanding of a critical chapter of American political history. In , historian and New York City journalist Terry Golway convincingly dismantles these stereotypes; Tammany's corruption was real, but so was its heretofore forgotten role in protecting marginalized and maligned immigrants in desperate need of a political voice.
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