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1 Hawthorne GN- GRAPHIC NOVELS

Levitation: Physics and Psychology in the Service of Deception

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Levitation: Physics and Psychology in the Service of Deception Cover

ISBN13: 9780978803704
ISBN10: 0978803701
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Levitation tells the story of the most dazzling gravity-defying illusion ever performed on stage, and features a cast of characters that seems almost too good to be true: John Neville Maskelyne, the very proper scientist-magician and the trick's inventor; Harry Kellar, the brash American who fails to buy the illusion, so steals it instead; Howard Thurston, the handsome and charismatic performer who inherits the act from Kellar; and Guy Jarrett, the rough-and-tumble engineer who perfects the levitation and guides us through the unfolding drama. But true it is - you'll never look at magic, or the mysteries of science - the same way again.

Review:

"'This nonfiction graphic novel gives the history of three early 20th-century magicians and the invention of the standard levitation trick. It's claimed that 'Entranced Fakir,' or 'The Levitation of the Princess of Karnak' came from India, but in reality it was stolen from European magician John Neville Maskelyne by American Harry Kellar, who took it back to the States. Years later, it was passed on to Howard Thurston, who had 'the voice and bearing of a preacher with the manner of a carnival barker.' (Kellar notes that the two professions are 'not so different.') The art is lively with nice Georgian and Jazz Age touches, especially in face shots that resemble old, hypnotic-eyed daguerreotypes of mesmerists in frock coats. It's all good fun, but the story never finds its heart, only touching on the obsessive control the great traveling magicians must have had, and their life on the road. The hard economics they faced comes through splendidly, however. To perform, they had to look like gentlemen. To survive, they had to act like cutthroat rogues. The story contains two revelations: one is the diagram explaining the trick. The other is the revelation that even when audience members are quietly shown how it works, they don't tell.(July)' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

MAA, July 22, 2012 (view all comments by MAA)
Excellent. Ottaviani's entire series of science graphic novels are topnotch. Highly recommended, as are all of his graphic novels.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780978803704
Author:
Ottaviani, Jim
Publisher:
G.T. Labs
Illustrator:
Johnston, Janine
Subject:
General
Subject:
Nonfiction
Subject:
Comic books, strips, etc.
Subject:
Magicians
Subject:
Graphic Novels
Subject:
Graphic Novels-Nonfiction
Publication Date:
20070731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Young adult
Language:
English
Illustrations:
YES
Pages:
71
Dimensions:
8.88x6.61x.22 in. .26 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » General
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Nonfiction
Metaphysics » General

Levitation: Physics and Psychology in the Service of Deception Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 71 pages G.T. Labs - English 9780978803704 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'This nonfiction graphic novel gives the history of three early 20th-century magicians and the invention of the standard levitation trick. It's claimed that 'Entranced Fakir,' or 'The Levitation of the Princess of Karnak' came from India, but in reality it was stolen from European magician John Neville Maskelyne by American Harry Kellar, who took it back to the States. Years later, it was passed on to Howard Thurston, who had 'the voice and bearing of a preacher with the manner of a carnival barker.' (Kellar notes that the two professions are 'not so different.') The art is lively with nice Georgian and Jazz Age touches, especially in face shots that resemble old, hypnotic-eyed daguerreotypes of mesmerists in frock coats. It's all good fun, but the story never finds its heart, only touching on the obsessive control the great traveling magicians must have had, and their life on the road. The hard economics they faced comes through splendidly, however. To perform, they had to look like gentlemen. To survive, they had to act like cutthroat rogues. The story contains two revelations: one is the diagram explaining the trick. The other is the revelation that even when audience members are quietly shown how it works, they don't tell.(July)' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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