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Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

by and

Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die Cover

ISBN13: 9781400064281
ISBN10: 1400064287
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Staff Pick

Some ideas become success stories, others don't stick around. In this no-nonsense look at successful communication the brothers Heath examine the principles of "stickiness" considering the elements needed to make a particular idea take hold. An entertaining and often eye-opening read.
Recommended by Chandler, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Mark Twain once observed, "A lie can get halfway around the world before the truth can even get its boots on." His observation rings true: Urban legends, conspiracy theories, and bogus public-health scares circulate effortlessly. Meanwhile, people with important ideas — business people, teachers, politicians, journalists, and others — struggle to make their ideas "stick."

Why do some ideas thrive while others die? And how do we improve the chances of worthy ideas? In Made to Stick, accomplished educators and idea collectors Chip and Dan Heath tackle head-on these vexing questions. Inside, the brothers Heath reveal the anatomy of ideas that stick and explain ways to make ideas stickier, such as applying the "human scale principle," using the "Velcro Theory of Memory," and creating "curiosity gaps."

In this indispensable guide, we discover that sticky messages of all kinds — from the infamous "kidney theft ring" hoax to a coach's lessons on sportsmanship to a vision for a new product at Sony — draw their power from the same six traits.

Made to Stick is a book that will transform the way you communicate ideas. It's a fast-paced tour of success stories (and failures) — the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who drank a glass of bacteria to prove a point about stomach ulcers; the charities who make use of "the Mother Teresa Effect"; the elementary-school teacher whose simulation actually prevented racial prejudice. Provocative, eye-opening, and often surprisingly funny, Made to Stick shows us the vital principles of winning ideas — and tells us how we can apply these rules to making our own messages stick.

Review:

"Unabashedly inspired by Malcolm Gladwell's bestselling The Tipping Point, the brothers Heath — Chip a professor at Stanford's business school, Dan a teacher and textbook publisher — offer an entertaining, practical guide to effective communication. Drawing extensively on psychosocial studies on memory, emotion and motivation, their study is couched in terms of 'stickiness' — that is, the art of making ideas unforgettable. They start by relating the gruesome urban legend about a man who succumbs to a barroom flirtation only to wake up in a tub of ice, victim of an organ-harvesting ring. What makes such stories memorable and ensures their spread around the globe? The authors credit six key principles: simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotions and stories. (The initial letters spell out 'success' — well, almost.) They illustrate these principles with a host of stories, some familiar (Kennedy's stirring call to 'land a man on the moon and return him safely to the earth' within a decade) and others very funny (Nora Ephron's anecdote of how her high school journalism teacher used a simple, embarrassing trick to teach her how not to 'bury the lead'). Throughout the book, sidebars show how bland messages can be made intriguing. Fun to read and solidly researched, this book deserves a wide readership." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"'If I look at the mass, I will never act. If I look at the one, I will.' So said Mother Teresa, and she was right. For a variety of reasons, some of them recently documented in laboratory studies by research psychologists, people who are either left cold or are overwhelmed when confronted with the suffering of thousands will rush into action when they are presented with a way to save one starving... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Exercises, checklists, and other tools are sprinkled throughout the book to help the reader understand and test how stickiness can be applied to their ideas, whether they are teachers, parents, or CEOs." Booklist

Review:

"That rare instance of a formula biz book backed up with dozens of compulsively readable theories, studies, and surveys." FastCompany

Synopsis:

An essential guidebook for honing business communication skills...

Communications expert Dianna Booher provides an essential nine-point checklist for success in the art of communication and persuasion—for building solid relationships, and for increasing credibility in the workplace. With lessons from politics, pop culture, business, family life, and current events, the book identifies common reasons that communicators fail to accomplish their goals, along with examples and analyses of messages that succeed and those that fail.

Synopsis:

Mark Twain once observed, “A lie can get halfway around the world before the truth can even get its boots on.” His observation rings true: Urban legends, conspiracy theories, and bogus public-health scares circulate effortlessly. Meanwhile, people with important ideas-business people, teachers, politicians, journalists, and others-struggle to make their ideas “stick.”

Why do some ideas thrive while others die? And how do we improve the chances of worthy ideas? In Made to Stick, accomplished educators and idea collectors Chip and Dan Heath tackle head-on these vexing questions. Inside, the brothers Heath reveal the anatomy of ideas that stick and explain ways to make ideas stickier, such as applying the “human scale principle,” using the “Velcro Theory of Memory,” and creating “curiosity gaps.”

In this indispensable guide, we discover that sticky messages of all kinds-from the infamous “kidney theft ring” hoax to a coachs lessons on sportsmanship to a vision for a new product at Sony-draw their power from the same six traits.

Made to Stick is a book that will transform the way you communicate ideas. Its a fast-paced tour of success stories (and failures)-the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who drank a glass of bacteria to prove a point about stomach ulcers; the charities who make use of “the Mother Teresa Effect”; the elementary-school teacher whose simulation actually prevented racial prejudice. Provocative, eye-opening, and often surprisingly funny, Made to Stick shows us the vital principles of winning ideas-and tells us how we can apply these rules to making our own messages stick.

About the Author

Chip Heath is a professor of organizational behavior in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. He lives in Los Gatos, California.

Dan Heath is a consultant at Duke Corporate Education. A former researcher at Harvard Business School, he is a co-founder of Thinkwell, an innovative new-media textbook company. He lives in Raleigh, North Carolina.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Patsy Delaney, January 1, 2012 (view all comments by Patsy Delaney)
I loved this book because in my work change is the word of the day and this book gives you a new outlook on how to make that happen. The image of The Elephant, the rider, and the path make it simple to create change in your environment by clearly stating the destination, showing how to get there and speaking to the elephant or the emotion of the participants to actually make them want to change.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Shoshana, November 11, 2007 (view all comments by Shoshana)
An easy to read and palatable example of its genre (it thinks it's social psychology, but it seems more pitched to management than anything else), Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die teaches a basic paradigm related to the "stickiness" of ideas, and how to make them stickier. The authors open with some urban legends, then analyze them to show why they stick--that is, why people remember them and find them highly salient. It goes on to situate itself in the context of Malcolm Gladwell's discussion of "The Stickiness Factor" in The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference.

The book is distinguished from many of its ilk in that it does not seem to exist for the purpose of helping the reader to deceive others (as do many texts on advertising techniques), it draws from a variety of credible empirical and theoretical sources, and it has benign applications outside the realm of economics. I can easily see ways to incorporate their basic ideas into lesson plans, especially lessons that would help my students design promotional materials, report findings, or direct clientele to the agencies at which they train. While my copy is as full of marginal notes as any non-fiction I read, more of my comments reflect my engagement with the material rather than any substantive dispute with it.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781400064281
Author:
Chip Heath and Dan Heath
Publisher:
Random House
Author:
Chip Heath & Dan Heath
Author:
Heath
Author:
Chip Heath & Dan Heath
Author:
Chip
Author:
Heath, Chip
Author:
Booher, Dianna
Author:
Heath, Dan
Subject:
Social Psychology
Subject:
Strategic planning
Subject:
Context effects (psychology)
Subject:
General Business & Economics
Subject:
business, business plans
Subject:
Business Communication
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20070131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
7.5 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Business » Business Plans
Business » Featured Titles
Business » General
Business » Marketing
Business » Writing

Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.95 In Stock
Product details 176 pages Random House - English 9781400064281 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Some ideas become success stories, others don't stick around. In this no-nonsense look at successful communication the brothers Heath examine the principles of "stickiness" considering the elements needed to make a particular idea take hold. An entertaining and often eye-opening read.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Unabashedly inspired by Malcolm Gladwell's bestselling The Tipping Point, the brothers Heath — Chip a professor at Stanford's business school, Dan a teacher and textbook publisher — offer an entertaining, practical guide to effective communication. Drawing extensively on psychosocial studies on memory, emotion and motivation, their study is couched in terms of 'stickiness' — that is, the art of making ideas unforgettable. They start by relating the gruesome urban legend about a man who succumbs to a barroom flirtation only to wake up in a tub of ice, victim of an organ-harvesting ring. What makes such stories memorable and ensures their spread around the globe? The authors credit six key principles: simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotions and stories. (The initial letters spell out 'success' — well, almost.) They illustrate these principles with a host of stories, some familiar (Kennedy's stirring call to 'land a man on the moon and return him safely to the earth' within a decade) and others very funny (Nora Ephron's anecdote of how her high school journalism teacher used a simple, embarrassing trick to teach her how not to 'bury the lead'). Throughout the book, sidebars show how bland messages can be made intriguing. Fun to read and solidly researched, this book deserves a wide readership." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Exercises, checklists, and other tools are sprinkled throughout the book to help the reader understand and test how stickiness can be applied to their ideas, whether they are teachers, parents, or CEOs."
"Review" by , "That rare instance of a formula biz book backed up with dozens of compulsively readable theories, studies, and surveys."
"Synopsis" by ,
An essential guidebook for honing business communication skills...

Communications expert Dianna Booher provides an essential nine-point checklist for success in the art of communication and persuasion—for building solid relationships, and for increasing credibility in the workplace. With lessons from politics, pop culture, business, family life, and current events, the book identifies common reasons that communicators fail to accomplish their goals, along with examples and analyses of messages that succeed and those that fail.

"Synopsis" by , Mark Twain once observed, “A lie can get halfway around the world before the truth can even get its boots on.” His observation rings true: Urban legends, conspiracy theories, and bogus public-health scares circulate effortlessly. Meanwhile, people with important ideas-business people, teachers, politicians, journalists, and others-struggle to make their ideas “stick.”

Why do some ideas thrive while others die? And how do we improve the chances of worthy ideas? In Made to Stick, accomplished educators and idea collectors Chip and Dan Heath tackle head-on these vexing questions. Inside, the brothers Heath reveal the anatomy of ideas that stick and explain ways to make ideas stickier, such as applying the “human scale principle,” using the “Velcro Theory of Memory,” and creating “curiosity gaps.”

In this indispensable guide, we discover that sticky messages of all kinds-from the infamous “kidney theft ring” hoax to a coachs lessons on sportsmanship to a vision for a new product at Sony-draw their power from the same six traits.

Made to Stick is a book that will transform the way you communicate ideas. Its a fast-paced tour of success stories (and failures)-the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who drank a glass of bacteria to prove a point about stomach ulcers; the charities who make use of “the Mother Teresa Effect”; the elementary-school teacher whose simulation actually prevented racial prejudice. Provocative, eye-opening, and often surprisingly funny, Made to Stick shows us the vital principles of winning ideas-and tells us how we can apply these rules to making our own messages stick.

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