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2 Beaverton Graphic Novels- General

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Human Target: Strike Zones

by

Human Target: Strike Zones Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Exploring the psychological impact of identity and individuality, HUMAN TARGET: STRIKE ZONES is a high-octane, action-packed adventure of unexpected twists and surprising turns. As a master of disguise, Christopher Chance makes a perilous living by impersonating assassination targets. Utilizing his vast array of physical skills. Chance is notorious for finding a way to survive any attempt on his life. But with each job the Human Target takes, he comes closer to losing his identity and sanity to the mental duress of deep cover. In this engrossing volume. Chance assumes the guise of a violent film producer, a corrupt corporate executive and a professional baseball player. SUGGESTED FOR MATURE READERS.

Review:

"This tricky reinvention of a lesser-known DC character from the 1970s (created by Len Wein and Carmine Infantino) is worth sampling. Christopher Chance, the title character, is the perfect investigator/bodyguard/impersonator. He can not only look like someone else but in effect become the endangered man whose place he's taking. Thus solving a case means not just preventing a murder but also figuring out how the victim created his own predicament. Chase has to admit that he (and his assumed identity) is somehow responsible for the mess, then resolve it (usually violently), and then struggle to escape from the guilty role he's been playing back into his own somewhat more innocent personality. This may sound abstract and pretentious, but Milligan's scripts deftly put Chance in situations that neatly illustrate his hero's identity crisis and also the uneasiness of many 21st-century people who discover that their behavior doesn't match their self-images. Milligan knows Chance isn't the only one perplexed by the attractiveness of media violence, the morally ambiguous aftermath of 9/11 or the temptation to enhance one's professional performance by using drugs. Pulido's art is less successful; it's better in overall design than execution of details. However, the pictures tell the stories well enough, and this is a comic that relies more on an intellectual concept than visual excitement." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781401202095
Author:
Pulido, Javier
Publisher:
Vertigo
Illustrator:
Pulido, Javier
Subject:
Criminology
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Sociology
Subject:
Graphic Novels - General
Subject:
General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20040501
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
, Y
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
10.24x6.52x.25 in. .43 lbs.
Age Level:
13-22

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » General
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Mystery and Thrillers

Human Target: Strike Zones Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.50 In Stock
Product details 128 pages DC Comics - English 9781401202095 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This tricky reinvention of a lesser-known DC character from the 1970s (created by Len Wein and Carmine Infantino) is worth sampling. Christopher Chance, the title character, is the perfect investigator/bodyguard/impersonator. He can not only look like someone else but in effect become the endangered man whose place he's taking. Thus solving a case means not just preventing a murder but also figuring out how the victim created his own predicament. Chase has to admit that he (and his assumed identity) is somehow responsible for the mess, then resolve it (usually violently), and then struggle to escape from the guilty role he's been playing back into his own somewhat more innocent personality. This may sound abstract and pretentious, but Milligan's scripts deftly put Chance in situations that neatly illustrate his hero's identity crisis and also the uneasiness of many 21st-century people who discover that their behavior doesn't match their self-images. Milligan knows Chance isn't the only one perplexed by the attractiveness of media violence, the morally ambiguous aftermath of 9/11 or the temptation to enhance one's professional performance by using drugs. Pulido's art is less successful; it's better in overall design than execution of details. However, the pictures tell the stories well enough, and this is a comic that relies more on an intellectual concept than visual excitement." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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