We Need Diverse Ya Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Lists | June 22, 2015

    Stephen Jarvis: IMG Robert Seymour — 13 Pictures



    1. Self-Portrait. My new novel, Death and Mr. Pickwick, tells the story of the origins of Charles Dickens's first novel, The Pickwick Papers. Its... Continue »
    1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Death and Mr. Pickwick

      Stephen Jarvis 9780374139667

    spacer

On Order

$17.95
New Trade Paper
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

This Is How It Starts

by

This Is How It Starts Cover

ISBN13: 9781416595595
ISBN10: 1416595597
Condition:
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

in the tradition of Jay McInerney, Grant Ginder’s phenomenal debut novel follows one post-collegiate idealist on his quest to fit in with—and then distance himself from—capital hill’s up-andcoming political and social elite who work hard but play harder.

• Striking debut: echoing with razor-sharp commentary, This Is How It Starts deftly captures the escapades of D.C.’s moneyed, socially and politically connected recent graduates. In this Bright Lights, Big City for the beltway, secrets are currency, the sex is bipartisan, and rules and boundaries are obsolete.

• Remarkable voice: Ginder’s writing is smart, witty, and resonates with an authenticity that will hook literary-minded readers of Brett easton ellis, Jeff Hobbs, and Joshua Ferris.

• Intriguing narrator: Taylor mack may have graduated from Princeton, but his Laguna Beach upbringing inadequately prepared him for life among D.C.’s movers and shakers. entertaining mishaps aside, Taylor soon discerns how to play the game and learns the cost of being an insider in a town that is unyielding in what it will take from a person in exchange for granting him a margin of knowledge and power.

Review:

"A University of Pennsylvania graduate moves to Washington, D.C., to work as a congressional aide in Ginder's lightly cynical Bright Lights, Big City treatment of Washington. Taylor Mark seems more interested in Late Night Shots parties (a displaced WASP social phenomenon) than political parties as he learns the ropes on Capital Hill, so the political satire feels mild compared to the social commentary Ginder offers about the Beltway social scene. Taylor begins an affair with his congressman's unhappy wife (she's a 'gorgeous disaster') and begins to doubt the character of his super-wealthy best friend, Chase Latham, son of a prominent Republican lobbyist who has a thing going with Taylor's cousin. But it seems Ginder has never met a clich he didn't want to enshrine: here, wives of wealthy husbands are catty, gay men write gossip columns, rich guys are laddish boors and their parents are absent, medicated or disapproving. Although light on plot and character development, the author does manage to expose the Hill rat lifestyle with some scalpel-sharp observations, showing that snobbery and envy are bipartisan values. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

It may not seem like a bad way to start, using an iconic novel such as "Bright Lights, Big City" as the template for your debut. Just replace New York with Washington (so hot right now!), publishing with politics, the Coma Baby with a seersucker bow tie, and there you have it: the D.C. version of Jay McInerney's classic. Someone had to write one eventually.

Grant Ginder's first novel,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

Ginder's debut novel follows one post-collegiate idealist on his quest to fit in with--and then distance himself from--Capitol Hill's up-and-coming political and social elite who work hard but play harder.

Synopsis:

Meet Taylor Mark: a recent college graduate who has moved to Washington, D.C., to work for John Grayson, the less-than-brilliant congressman from his home district in southern California. Inadequately prepared for life among D.C.'s movers and shakers, Taylor quickly learns that Washington is a city where deals are made behind closed doors. And there's no one better to teach him — and Grayson — that lesson than Chase Latham, Taylor's former college roommate and the son of a powerful lobbyist. To Chase, the Beltway's bars, restaurants, town houses, and government offices are one big, debauched playground — a land of milk and honey where secrets are currency, the sex is bipartisan, and rules and boundaries are obsolete. It's a place where, as the stakes are raised, the line between right and wrong becomes blurred and friends' loyalties are nothing more than fragments of the past.

This Is How It Starts is an incisively written debut novel about how far one postcollegiate idealist will go to be an insider in a town that is unyielding in what it will take from a person in exchange for granting him a margin of knowledge and power.

Synopsis:

Ginder's phenomenal debut novel deftly captures the escapades of D.C.'s up-and-coming political and social elite as they navigate life in the beltway.

About the Author

Grant Ginder graduated from the university of Pennsylvania, where he edited 34th Street, the school’s humor and culture magazine. He currently works as a speechwriting associate at the Center for American Progress, a Washington, D.C.–based think tank. He lives in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

eglazier, April 13, 2010 (view all comments by eglazier)
if one likes reading about immature people who are constant drunks, this novel is for you. none of the characters here has any redeeming feature. we are treated to a bunch of wealthy, powerful post-teenagers whose power is given them by their brain-dead followers.

i am reminded of my being at grad school and watching a whole class of new students striving for their ph.d. who decided to follow an immature ex-frat guy because he was charasmatic. he convinced them during the first year to form a study group he led to study for their qualifying exams. they followed and in september of the second year, they took the exams and all failed, an unheard of event in any graduate class.

this novel reminds me of that grouping; a bunch of naive followers following a ner'e do well drunk to defeat and obscurity.

best advice, find something much better to read. it cost me $14. at barnes and nobel to learn this.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781416595595
Author:
Ginder, Grant
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Subject:
Self-actualization (psychology)
Subject:
College graduates
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Washington (D.C.) Social life and customs.
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20090631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.28x6.28x.81 in. .71 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Girl with a Pearl Earring
    Used Trade Paper $2.50
  2. The Secret Life of Bees
    Used Trade Paper $2.95
  3. Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search...
    Used Trade Paper $3.95
  4. What Would Jackie Do?: An Inspired... Used Trade Paper $3.50
  5. Under the Tuscan Sun
    Used Trade Paper $4.50

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

This Is How It Starts New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.95 Backorder
Product details 288 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781416595595 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A University of Pennsylvania graduate moves to Washington, D.C., to work as a congressional aide in Ginder's lightly cynical Bright Lights, Big City treatment of Washington. Taylor Mark seems more interested in Late Night Shots parties (a displaced WASP social phenomenon) than political parties as he learns the ropes on Capital Hill, so the political satire feels mild compared to the social commentary Ginder offers about the Beltway social scene. Taylor begins an affair with his congressman's unhappy wife (she's a 'gorgeous disaster') and begins to doubt the character of his super-wealthy best friend, Chase Latham, son of a prominent Republican lobbyist who has a thing going with Taylor's cousin. But it seems Ginder has never met a clich he didn't want to enshrine: here, wives of wealthy husbands are catty, gay men write gossip columns, rich guys are laddish boors and their parents are absent, medicated or disapproving. Although light on plot and character development, the author does manage to expose the Hill rat lifestyle with some scalpel-sharp observations, showing that snobbery and envy are bipartisan values. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Ginder's debut novel follows one post-collegiate idealist on his quest to fit in with--and then distance himself from--Capitol Hill's up-and-coming political and social elite who work hard but play harder.
"Synopsis" by , Meet Taylor Mark: a recent college graduate who has moved to Washington, D.C., to work for John Grayson, the less-than-brilliant congressman from his home district in southern California. Inadequately prepared for life among D.C.'s movers and shakers, Taylor quickly learns that Washington is a city where deals are made behind closed doors. And there's no one better to teach him — and Grayson — that lesson than Chase Latham, Taylor's former college roommate and the son of a powerful lobbyist. To Chase, the Beltway's bars, restaurants, town houses, and government offices are one big, debauched playground — a land of milk and honey where secrets are currency, the sex is bipartisan, and rules and boundaries are obsolete. It's a place where, as the stakes are raised, the line between right and wrong becomes blurred and friends' loyalties are nothing more than fragments of the past.

This Is How It Starts is an incisively written debut novel about how far one postcollegiate idealist will go to be an insider in a town that is unyielding in what it will take from a person in exchange for granting him a margin of knowledge and power.

"Synopsis" by , Ginder's phenomenal debut novel deftly captures the escapades of D.C.'s up-and-coming political and social elite as they navigate life in the beltway.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.