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The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Everyone knows the story of Elizabeth and Jane Bennet in Pride and Prejudice. But what about their sister Mary? At the conclusion of Jane Austen's classic novel, Mary, bookish, awkward, and by all accounts, unmarriageable, is sentenced to a dull, provincial existence in the backwaters of Britain. Now, master storyteller Colleen McCullough rescues Mary from her dreary fate with The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet, a page-turning sequel set twenty years after Austen's novel closes. The story begins as the neglected Bennet sister is released from the stultifying duty of caring for her insufferable mother. Though many would call a woman of Mary's age a spinster, she has blossomed into a beauty to rival that of her famed sisters. Her violet eyes and perfect figure bewitch the eligible men in the neighborhood, but though her family urges her to marry, romance and frippery hold no attraction. Instead, she is determined to set off on an adventure of her own. Fired with zeal by the newspaper letters of the mysterious Argus, she resolves to publish a book about the plight of England's poor. Plunging from one predicament into another, Mary finds herself stumbling closer to long-buried secrets, unanticipated dangers, and unlooked-for romance.

Meanwhile, the other dearly loved characters of Pride and Prejudice fret about the missing Mary while they contend with difficulties of their own. Darcy's political ambitions consume his ardor, and he bothers with Elizabeth only when the impropriety of her family seems to threaten his career. Lydia, wild and charming as ever, drinks and philanders her way into dire straits; Kitty, a young widow of means, occupies herself with gossip and shopping; and Jane, naïve and trusting as ever, spends her days ministering to her crop of boys and her adoring, if not entirely faithful, husband. Yet, with the shadowy and mysterious figure of Darcys right-hand man, Ned Skinner, lurking at every corner, it is clear that all is not what it seems at idyllic Pemberley. As the many threads of McCulloughs masterful plot come together, shocking truths are revealed, love, both old and new, is tested, and all learn the value of true independence in a novel for every woman who has wanted to leave her mark on the world.

Review:

"McCullough's (The Thorn Birds) sequel to Pride and Prejudice vaults the characters of the original into a ridiculously bizarre world, spinning dizzily among plot lines until it finally crashes to a close. The novel begins 20 years after Austen's classic ends, with Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy trapped in a passionless marriage, Jane a spineless baby machine, Lydia an alcoholic tramp, Kitty a cheerfully vapid widow and Mary a nave feminist and social crusader. Shrewish Mrs. Bennet's death frees Mary from her caretaker duties, and, inspired by the writings of a crusading journalist, Mary sets off to document the plight of England's poor. Along the way, she is abused, robbed and imprisoned by the prophet of a cave-dwelling cult. Darcy is the book's villain, and he busies himself with hushing up the Bennet clan's improprieties in service of his political career. His dirty work is carried out by Ned Skinner, whose odd devotion to Darcy drives his exploits, the nastiest of which involves murder. McCullough lacks Austen's gently reproving good humor, making the family's adventures into a mannered spaghetti western with a tacked-on, albeit Austenesque, happy ending." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

Rest in peace, Jane Austen. Your avid 21st-century fans may be outraged by this new and improved Mary Bennet, but I prefer to take her as a tribute to your unmatched ability to intrigue the imagination. "Pride and Prejudice" was recently chosen as the world's best novel by 15,000 customers of Australia's leading bookseller. Perhaps this resounding vote of confidence suggested to Australian writer Colleen... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

The bestselling author of "The Thorn Birds" breathes new life into the characters of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." Jane and Elizabeth's younger, bookish sister, Mary is still too willful to be confined within traditional marriage, so she embarks on an adventure of her own.

About the Author

Collen McCullough lives on Norfolk Island in the South Pacific with her husband of twenty-two years, Ric Robinson.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781416596486
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Subject:
Historical - General
Author:
McCullough, Colleen
Subject:
Romance - Historical
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Sisters
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
England
Publication Date:
December 2008
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 352 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781416596486 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "McCullough's (The Thorn Birds) sequel to Pride and Prejudice vaults the characters of the original into a ridiculously bizarre world, spinning dizzily among plot lines until it finally crashes to a close. The novel begins 20 years after Austen's classic ends, with Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy trapped in a passionless marriage, Jane a spineless baby machine, Lydia an alcoholic tramp, Kitty a cheerfully vapid widow and Mary a nave feminist and social crusader. Shrewish Mrs. Bennet's death frees Mary from her caretaker duties, and, inspired by the writings of a crusading journalist, Mary sets off to document the plight of England's poor. Along the way, she is abused, robbed and imprisoned by the prophet of a cave-dwelling cult. Darcy is the book's villain, and he busies himself with hushing up the Bennet clan's improprieties in service of his political career. His dirty work is carried out by Ned Skinner, whose odd devotion to Darcy drives his exploits, the nastiest of which involves murder. McCullough lacks Austen's gently reproving good humor, making the family's adventures into a mannered spaghetti western with a tacked-on, albeit Austenesque, happy ending." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , The bestselling author of "The Thorn Birds" breathes new life into the characters of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." Jane and Elizabeth's younger, bookish sister, Mary is still too willful to be confined within traditional marriage, so she embarks on an adventure of her own.
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