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Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat: A Story of Bulimia

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Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat: A Story of Bulimia Cover

ISBN13: 9781556527869
ISBN10: 1556527861
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Stephanie Covington Armstrong does not fit the stereotype of a woman with an eating disorder. She grew up poor and hungry in the inner city. Foster care, sexual abuse, and overwhelming insecurity defined her early years. But the biggest difference is her race: Stephanie is black.
 
In this moving first-person narrative, Armstrong describes her struggle as a black woman with a disorder consistently portrayed as a white womans problem. Trying to escape her selfhatred and her food obsession by never slowing down, Stephanie becomes trapped in a downward spiral. Finally, she can no longer deny that she will die if she doesnt get help, overcome her shame, and conquer her addiction to using food as a weapon against herself.
 
For more information about the book and eating disorders, visit www.notallblackgirls.com
 

Synopsis:

Describing her struggle as a black woman with an eating disorder that is consistently portrayed as a white woman's problem, this insightful and moving narrative traces the background and factors that caused her bulimia. Moving coast to coast, she tries to escape her self-hatred and obsession by never slowing down, unaware that she is caught in downward spiral emotionally, spiritually, and physically. Finally she can no longer deny that she will die if she doesn't get help, overcome her shame, and conquer her addiction. But seeking help only reinforces her negative self-image, and she discovers her race makes her an oddity in the all-white programs for eating disorders. This memoir of her experiences answers many questions about why black women often do not seek traditional therapy for emotional problems.

About the Author

Stephanie Covington Armstrong is a playwright and screenwriter who has written for Essence, Mademoiselle, Sassy, and Venice magazines. Her essay on bulima, "Fear and Loathing," is included in the forthcoming Norton anthology The Black Body. She lives in Los Angeles.

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

along, August 31, 2009 (view all comments by along)
I'm looking forward to reading this book and to well, looking forward to my own day-by-day recovery. I too struggle with bulimia and do so beyond the stereotype of an affluent, waif-like white girl. I grew up poor, but did a good job of hiding it, an art of deception that came in handy while binging and avoiding meals. I grew up miles beyond the country-clubbed suburbs in the country where trips to get a nonfat frozen yogurt took 40 minutes. I am white, but it took at least two years of restricting and/or binging to be described as waif-like. Although no longer skin and bones, I am still fighting the desire to be so.

Stephanie is courageous for getting this out there but I do hope that the story that gets spun in book reviews and interviews doesn't reinforce the "skinny rich white girl" clique of eating disorders. I've been in group therapy with women of different colors and background and am glad we all felt welcome there. Bulimia thrives in isolation; let's not let anyone of any color or gender think they are alone.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781556527869
Author:
Armstrong, Stephanie Covington
Publisher:
Lawrence Hill Books
Author:
Covington Armstrong, Stephanie
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
Eating Disorders - General
Subject:
Health
Subject:
Mental health
Subject:
General
Subject:
New york (n.y.)
Subject:
African-American women
Subject:
Specific Groups - General
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Eating Disorders
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20090831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.6 in 1 lb

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Children's » Activities » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Eating Disorders
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General

Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat: A Story of Bulimia New Trade Paper
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$16.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Lawrence Hill Books - English 9781556527869 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Describing her struggle as a black woman with an eating disorder that is consistently portrayed as a white woman's problem, this insightful and moving narrative traces the background and factors that caused her bulimia. Moving coast to coast, she tries to escape her self-hatred and obsession by never slowing down, unaware that she is caught in downward spiral emotionally, spiritually, and physically. Finally she can no longer deny that she will die if she doesn't get help, overcome her shame, and conquer her addiction. But seeking help only reinforces her negative self-image, and she discovers her race makes her an oddity in the all-white programs for eating disorders. This memoir of her experiences answers many questions about why black women often do not seek traditional therapy for emotional problems.

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