Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 20, 2014

Julie Schumacher: IMG Dear Professor Fitger



Saint Paul, August 2014 Dear Professor Fitger, I've been asked to say a few words about you for Powells.com. Having dreamed you up with a ball-point... Continue »
  1. $16.07 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Dear Committee Members

    Julie Schumacher 9780385538138

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$16.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Literature- A to Z
25 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z
25 Remote Warehouse Literature- A to Z

Wittgenstein's Mistress: In the Beginning, Sometimes I Left Messages in the Street (American Literature)

by

Wittgenstein's Mistress: In the Beginning, Sometimes I Left Messages in the Street (American Literature) Cover

ISBN13: 9781564782113
ISBN10: 1564782115
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Wittgenstein's Mistress is a novel unlike anything David Markson — or anyone else — has ever written. It is the story of a woman who is convinced — and may ultimately convince the reader as well — that she is the only person left on earth. Presumably she is mad. And yet so appealing is her character, and so witty and seductive her narrative voice, that we will follow her hypnotically as she unloads the intellectual baggage of a lifetime in a series of irreverent meditations on everything from Brahms to sex to Heidegger to Helen of Troy.

Review:

"As precise and dazzling as Joyce....I couldn't put this book down. I can't forget it....Original, beautiful, and an absolute masterpiece." Ann Beattie

Review:

"A work of genius...an erudite, breathtaking cerebral novel whose prose is crystal and whose voice rivets and whose conclusion defies you not to cry." David Foster Wallace

Review:

"Brilliant and often hilarious...Markson is the one working novelist I can think of who can claim affinities with Joyce, Gaddis, and Lowry, no less than with Beckett." San Francisco Review of Books

Review:

"The novel I liked best this year....one dizzying, delightful, funny passage after another....Wittgenstein's Mistress gives proof positive that the experimental novel can produce high, pure works of imagination." Washington Times

Synopsis:

Brilliant and often hilarious . . . Markson is one working novelist Ican think of who can claim affinities with Joyce, Gaddis, and Lowry, noless than with Beckett.Addresses formidable philosophic questions with tremendous wit . . .remarkable . . . a novel that can be parsed like a sentence; it is thatwell made.

Synopsis:

Wittgenstein's Mistress is a novel unlike anything David Markson--or anyone else--has ever written before. It is the story of a woman who is convinced--and, astonishingly, will ultimately convince the reader as well--that she is the only person left on earth.

Synopsis:

The heroine of David Markson's witty experimental novel is a woman named Kate, and she's convinced that she is the only person left on earth. Is she insane? And does it matter? As she ranges back through the events of her life, and through a ragbag of opinions on everything from Rembrandt's cat to Willem de Kooning's soccer shirt, Kate manages to find some kind of meaning for herself in the oddities she turns up.

Synopsis:

Presumably she is mad. And yet so appealing is her character, and so witty and seductive her narrative voice, that we will follow her hypnotically as she unloads the intellectual baggage of a lifetime in a series of irreverent meditations on everything and everybody from Brahms to sex to Heidegger to Helen of Troy. And as she contemplates aspects of the troubled past which have brought her to her present state--obviously a metaphor for ultimate loneliness--so too will her drama become one of the few certifiably original fictions of our time.

"The novel I liked best this year," said the Washington Times upon the book's publication in 1988; "one dizzying, delightful, funny passage after another . . . Wittgenstein's Mistress gives proof positive that the experimental novel can produce high, pure works of imagination."

About the Author

David Markson's novel Wittgenstein's Mistress was acclaimed by David Foster Wallace as "pretty much the high point of experimental fiction in this country." His other novels, including Reader's Block, Springer's Progress, and Vanishing Point, have expanded this high reputation. His novel The Ballad of Dingus Magee was made into the film Dirty Dingus Magee, which starred Frank Sinatra, and he is also the author of three crime novels. Born in Albany, New York, he has long lived in New York City.Steven Moore earned his Ph.D. at Rutgers University. He is a noted William Gaddis scholar and wrote William Gaddis, the first comprehensive critical guide to his work, and A Reader's Guide to William Gaddis's The Recognitions. Moore has edited a number of books, including Beerspit Night and Cursing: The Correspondence of Charles Bukowski & Sheri Martinelli 1960-1967 and In Recognition of William Gaddis. He has also contributed essays, articles, and reviews to a number of newspapers, journals, and magazines.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

WittsMiss, December 17, 2008 (view all comments by WittsMiss)
The novel’s concluding line—in many ways the saddest and most heart-breaking—is conversely the most optimistic as well; in the utter absence of any hope for the future, Kate continues her Sisyphean endeavor of artistic creation, repeating (not referencing) her earlier message in the sand and defying mortality by asserting her existence, even if it is true that her messages “begin to deteriorate…before they [are] finished being written” (185).
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 8 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781564782113
Author:
Markson, David
Publisher:
Dalkey Archive Press
Author:
Moore, Steven
Afterword by:
Moore, Steven
Afterword:
Moore, Steven
Location:
Chicago
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Survival
Subject:
Long island
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
2nd pbk. ed.
Edition Description:
Dalkey Archive
Series:
American Literature Series
Series Volume:
no.4/86
Publication Date:
19880531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.50x5.60x.75 in. .74 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Verificationist Used Trade Paper $4.50
  2. Under the Volcano (Perennial Classics)
    Used Trade Paper $9.95
  3. Ben's Trumpet Used Pamphlet $1.95
  4. A Northern Light
    Used Trade Paper $2.25
  5. Gilead
    Used Trade Paper $5.50

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » American Studies » Popular Culture
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Wittgenstein's Mistress: In the Beginning, Sometimes I Left Messages in the Street (American Literature) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Dalkey Archive Press - English 9781564782113 Reviews:
"Review" by , "As precise and dazzling as Joyce....I couldn't put this book down. I can't forget it....Original, beautiful, and an absolute masterpiece."
"Review" by , "A work of genius...an erudite, breathtaking cerebral novel whose prose is crystal and whose voice rivets and whose conclusion defies you not to cry."
"Review" by , "Brilliant and often hilarious...Markson is the one working novelist I can think of who can claim affinities with Joyce, Gaddis, and Lowry, no less than with Beckett."
"Review" by , "The novel I liked best this year....one dizzying, delightful, funny passage after another....Wittgenstein's Mistress gives proof positive that the experimental novel can produce high, pure works of imagination."
"Synopsis" by , Brilliant and often hilarious . . . Markson is one working novelist Ican think of who can claim affinities with Joyce, Gaddis, and Lowry, noless than with Beckett.Addresses formidable philosophic questions with tremendous wit . . .remarkable . . . a novel that can be parsed like a sentence; it is thatwell made.
"Synopsis" by , Wittgenstein's Mistress is a novel unlike anything David Markson--or anyone else--has ever written before. It is the story of a woman who is convinced--and, astonishingly, will ultimately convince the reader as well--that she is the only person left on earth.
"Synopsis" by , The heroine of David Markson's witty experimental novel is a woman named Kate, and she's convinced that she is the only person left on earth. Is she insane? And does it matter? As she ranges back through the events of her life, and through a ragbag of opinions on everything from Rembrandt's cat to Willem de Kooning's soccer shirt, Kate manages to find some kind of meaning for herself in the oddities she turns up.
"Synopsis" by , Presumably she is mad. And yet so appealing is her character, and so witty and seductive her narrative voice, that we will follow her hypnotically as she unloads the intellectual baggage of a lifetime in a series of irreverent meditations on everything and everybody from Brahms to sex to Heidegger to Helen of Troy. And as she contemplates aspects of the troubled past which have brought her to her present state--obviously a metaphor for ultimate loneliness--so too will her drama become one of the few certifiably original fictions of our time.

"The novel I liked best this year," said the Washington Times upon the book's publication in 1988; "one dizzying, delightful, funny passage after another . . . Wittgenstein's Mistress gives proof positive that the experimental novel can produce high, pure works of imagination."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.