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Being Esther

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Being Esther Cover

ISBN13: 9781571310965
ISBN10: 1571310967
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Growing old is one of the most surprising things that has happened to her. She hadnt given it any thought. Then one day, she was eighty-five. She is old. Not just old, but an object of derision, pity. Is there any use explaining that she is still herself—albeit a slower, achier, creakier version of the original?” —from Being Esther

Born to parents who fled the shtetl, Esther Lustig has led a seemingly conventional life—marriage, two children, a life in suburban Chicago. Now, at the age of eighty-five, her husband is deceased, her children have families of their own, and most of her friends are gone. Even in this diminished condition, life has its moments of richness, as well as its memorable characters. But above all there are the memories. Of better days with Marty, her husband. Of unrealized obsessions with other men.

As she moves back and forth through time, Esther attempts to come to terms with the meaning of her outwardly modest life. As a young woman, she wondered about the world beyond the narrow, prescribed world she inhabited. Now, cruelly, she cant help but wonder if she has done anything for which she will be remembered.

At once sad and amusing, unpretentious yet wonderfully ambitious, Miriam Karmels debut novel brings understanding and tremendous empathy to the unforgettable Esther Lustig.

A journalist and freelance writer, Miriam Karmel has published writing in AARP The Magazine, Minnesota Womens Press, Bellevue Literary Review, and Minnesota Monthly. She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Sandisfield, Massachusetts. Being Esther is her first novel.

Review:

"The heroine of Karmel's meandering debut novel is Esther Lustig, an 85-year-old widow who has led a quiet, middle-class Jewish life in the Chicago suburbs. Confronting the inevitability of death and the gradual diminishment of her faculties, Esther rummages through the past — from her marriage to an overbearing man, to her difficult relationship with her daughter, to thoughts (and even, a little more than thoughts) of romance with other men. Increasingly alone as her friends die or fade away, Esther regrets a life led without risk, and struggles to stay independent when her children try to put her in a home. The narrative progresses through loosely tied vignettes of the past and present, which dwell on the muted struggles and triumphs confronting an elderly woman whose life is defined by her ordinariness and quiet dignity. With its too-easy melancholy, the unremarkable plot is unfortunately matched by flavorless prose, and in the end, little insight is gained into Esther. The novel has graceful moments that aspire to the heights of Grace Paley or Alice Munro, but the overall effect is forgettable." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

"Growing old is one of the most surprising things that has happened to her. She hadn't given it any thought. Then one day, she was eighty-five. Not just old, but an object of derision, pity. Is there any use explaining that she is still herself—albeit a slower, achier, creakier version of the original?"

—from Being Esther

Being Esther intimately explores the interior consciousness of an elderly Jewish woman who lives as much in the past as in the present.

Whereas the past includes pleasant memories of family, love and lust, the happy confines of marriage, and the rare occasions to break those confines—like taking a part-time job as a bookseller at Kroch's and Brentano's—the present includes crossing out the names of the deceased in a phonebook, fending off attempts by her daughter to move into assisted living, daily check-ins with a neighbor, and the occasional outing. Not prone to self-pity, Esther is at moments lucid and then suddenly lost in a world which has disappeared along with many who had inhabited it.

Miriam Karmel's fiction debut brings understanding and tremendous empathy to the character of Esther Lustig, a woman who readers will not soon forget.

Synopsis:

In spare, refreshingly unsentimental prose, Minnesotan Miriam Karmel has given us one of literature's finest portraits of the last days of a woman's life. At once sad and amusing, unpretentious and ambitious, Karmel's fiction debut brings understanding and tremendous empathy to the character of Esther Lustig, a woman readers will recognize and embrace.

Synopsis:

A wonderful fiction debut, Being Esther gives voice to Esther Lustig, an extraordinary woman who has lived a conventional life, in this touching exploration of aging and its accompanied search for meaning.

In spare, refreshingly unsentimental prose, Miriam Karmel has given us one of literatures finest portraits of the last months of a womans life. At once sad and amusing, unpretentious and ambitious, Karmels fiction debut brings understanding and tremendous empathy to the character of Esther Lustig, a woman readers will recognize and embrace.

Born to parents who fled the shtetl, Esther Lustig has led a seemingly conventional life—marriage, two children, a life in suburban Chicago. Now, at the age of eighty-five, her husband is deceased, her children have families of their own, and most of her friends are gone. Even in this diminished condition, life has its moments of richness, as well as its memorable characters. Being Esther is an exploration of aging, a search for meaning, and about the need, as Esther puts it, for better roadmaps for growing old.

Synopsis:

Praise for Being Esther

“A novel about an eighty-five-year-old widow living in suburban Chicago may not sound irresistible, but thanks to Karmels beautifully precise prose, her absolute fidelity to her characters and their vicissitudes, and her keen wit, Being Esther is impossible to put down. What a wonderful debut.”

—Margot Livesey, author of The Flight of Gemma Hardy

Being Esther is a small masterpiece, every detail unerring. I wanted Esther to move in next door so we could play two-hand bridge and mix drinks with names like South Side Sling or Not Your Aunt Nellie. I would coax her to tell me about the boys before Marty and about the Starrlights. In Esther, Miriam Karmel has created a character one will never forget nor ever stop loving.”

—Faith Sullivan, author of The Cape Ann and Gardenias

“Miriam Karmels Esther is such a lively and attentive companion that I loved viewing the world through her eyes. Her acuteness challenges anyone who imagines aging only as diminution and a fading sense of self. Looking back, looking forward, Esther is curious, wryly funny and always (sometimes painfully) honest.”

—Rosellen Brown, author of Before and After

About the Author

Miriam Karmel has worked professionally as a newspaper reporter and magazine editor, and most recently as a freelance writer specializing in medicine and health. Her journalism has appeared in AARP magazine and for many years in Minnesota Women's Press. Her fiction has won numerous regional prizes, and her stories have been published in Bellevue Literary Review, Minnesota Monthly, as well as anthologized in Milkweed's Fiction on a Stick (2008). She lives in Minneapolis, MN and Sandisfield, MA. Being Esther is her first novel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

booksintheburbs, May 22, 2013 (view all comments by booksintheburbs)
I’ve read books like, “Still Alice”, where an adult woman experiences the onset of alzheimer’s and how her mind slowly betrays her. However, this is a new twist. This is a story about Esther, an elderly Jewish woman, who is quite coherent and present. After losing her husband and friends, she and her dear friend call each other every day to make sure they never die without someone knowing. The way it works, is they each take turns calling each other everyday. They both agree that if one doesn’t answer one day, then to make sure their family knows and to fulfill their wishes.

What truly is sad and heartwarming at the same time, is how time does fly by and how quickly one ages. What happens when you are alone, have a poor relationship with your child, have a life filled with special moments and some regrets? Through Esther’s journey, you will see how the simple acts of doing something each day and normal routine are still remarkable moments in life. Most importantly, that everyone has a story, deserves a listening ear, and a little bit of your time.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781571310965
Author:
Karmel, Miriam
Publisher:
Milkweed Editions
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20130331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Contemporary Women
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Debut Fiction
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Family Life

Being Esther Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Milkweed Editions - English 9781571310965 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The heroine of Karmel's meandering debut novel is Esther Lustig, an 85-year-old widow who has led a quiet, middle-class Jewish life in the Chicago suburbs. Confronting the inevitability of death and the gradual diminishment of her faculties, Esther rummages through the past — from her marriage to an overbearing man, to her difficult relationship with her daughter, to thoughts (and even, a little more than thoughts) of romance with other men. Increasingly alone as her friends die or fade away, Esther regrets a life led without risk, and struggles to stay independent when her children try to put her in a home. The narrative progresses through loosely tied vignettes of the past and present, which dwell on the muted struggles and triumphs confronting an elderly woman whose life is defined by her ordinariness and quiet dignity. With its too-easy melancholy, the unremarkable plot is unfortunately matched by flavorless prose, and in the end, little insight is gained into Esther. The novel has graceful moments that aspire to the heights of Grace Paley or Alice Munro, but the overall effect is forgettable." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
"Growing old is one of the most surprising things that has happened to her. She hadn't given it any thought. Then one day, she was eighty-five. Not just old, but an object of derision, pity. Is there any use explaining that she is still herself—albeit a slower, achier, creakier version of the original?"

—from Being Esther

Being Esther intimately explores the interior consciousness of an elderly Jewish woman who lives as much in the past as in the present.

Whereas the past includes pleasant memories of family, love and lust, the happy confines of marriage, and the rare occasions to break those confines—like taking a part-time job as a bookseller at Kroch's and Brentano's—the present includes crossing out the names of the deceased in a phonebook, fending off attempts by her daughter to move into assisted living, daily check-ins with a neighbor, and the occasional outing. Not prone to self-pity, Esther is at moments lucid and then suddenly lost in a world which has disappeared along with many who had inhabited it.

Miriam Karmel's fiction debut brings understanding and tremendous empathy to the character of Esther Lustig, a woman who readers will not soon forget.

"Synopsis" by ,
In spare, refreshingly unsentimental prose, Minnesotan Miriam Karmel has given us one of literature's finest portraits of the last days of a woman's life. At once sad and amusing, unpretentious and ambitious, Karmel's fiction debut brings understanding and tremendous empathy to the character of Esther Lustig, a woman readers will recognize and embrace.

"Synopsis" by ,
A wonderful fiction debut, Being Esther gives voice to Esther Lustig, an extraordinary woman who has lived a conventional life, in this touching exploration of aging and its accompanied search for meaning.

In spare, refreshingly unsentimental prose, Miriam Karmel has given us one of literatures finest portraits of the last months of a womans life. At once sad and amusing, unpretentious and ambitious, Karmels fiction debut brings understanding and tremendous empathy to the character of Esther Lustig, a woman readers will recognize and embrace.

Born to parents who fled the shtetl, Esther Lustig has led a seemingly conventional life—marriage, two children, a life in suburban Chicago. Now, at the age of eighty-five, her husband is deceased, her children have families of their own, and most of her friends are gone. Even in this diminished condition, life has its moments of richness, as well as its memorable characters. Being Esther is an exploration of aging, a search for meaning, and about the need, as Esther puts it, for better roadmaps for growing old.

"Synopsis" by ,

Praise for Being Esther

“A novel about an eighty-five-year-old widow living in suburban Chicago may not sound irresistible, but thanks to Karmels beautifully precise prose, her absolute fidelity to her characters and their vicissitudes, and her keen wit, Being Esther is impossible to put down. What a wonderful debut.”

—Margot Livesey, author of The Flight of Gemma Hardy

Being Esther is a small masterpiece, every detail unerring. I wanted Esther to move in next door so we could play two-hand bridge and mix drinks with names like South Side Sling or Not Your Aunt Nellie. I would coax her to tell me about the boys before Marty and about the Starrlights. In Esther, Miriam Karmel has created a character one will never forget nor ever stop loving.”

—Faith Sullivan, author of The Cape Ann and Gardenias

“Miriam Karmels Esther is such a lively and attentive companion that I loved viewing the world through her eyes. Her acuteness challenges anyone who imagines aging only as diminution and a fading sense of self. Looking back, looking forward, Esther is curious, wryly funny and always (sometimes painfully) honest.”

—Rosellen Brown, author of Before and After

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