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The Appalachian Frontier

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The Appalachian Frontier Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 373-399) and index.

Book News Annotation:

The series continues its efforts to republish and contextualize classic books on Appalachia by reviving the now late West Virginia historian Caruso's 1959 overview of European settlement in the mountainous region from the 17th century to Kentucky's statehood in 1796. John C. Inscoe (U. of Georgia) points out aspects of the account that have been superseded by subsequent information or theory. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

John Anthony Caruso’s The Appalachian Frontier, first published in 1959, captures the drama and sweep of a nation at the beginning of its westward expansion. Bringing to life the region’s history from its earliest seventeenth-century scouting parties to the admission of Tennessee to the Union in 1796, Caruso describes the exchange of ideas, values, and cultural traits that marked Appalachia as a unique frontier.

Looking at the rich and mountainous land between the Ohio and Tennessee Rivers, The Appalachian Frontier follows the story of the Long Hunters in Kentucky; the struggles of the Regulators in North Carolina; the founding of the Watauga, Transylvania, Franklin, and Cumberland settlements; the siege of Boonesboro; and the patterns and challenges of frontier life. While narrating the gripping stories of such figures as Daniel Boone, George Rogers Clark, and Chief Logan, Caruso combines social, political, and economic history into a comprehensive overview of the early mountain South.

In his new introduction, John C. Inscoe examines how this work exemplified the so-called consensus school of history that arose in the United States during the cold war. Unabashedly celebratory in his analysis of American nation building, Caruso shows how the development of Appalachia fit into the grander scheme of the evolution of the country. While there is much in The Appalachian Frontier that contemporary historians would regard as one-sided and romanticized, Inscoe points out that “those of us immersed so deeply in the study of the region and its people sometimes tend to forget that the white settlement of the mountain south in the eighteenth century was not merely the chronological foundation of the Appalachian experience. As Caruso so vividly demonstrates, it is also represented a vital—even defining—stage in the American progression across the continent.”

The

About the Author

The Author - John Anthony Caruso was a professor of history at West Virginia University. He died in 1997.

John C. Inscoe is professor of history at the University of Georgia. He is editor of Appalachians and Race: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation and author of Mountain Masters: Slavery and the Sectional Crisis in Western North Carolina.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781572332157
Subtitle:
America'S First Surge Westward
Editor:
Echoes, Appalachian
Editor:
Echoes, Appalachian
Editor:
Dunn, Durwood
Author:
Caruso, John Anthony
Editor:
Dunn, Durwood
Publisher:
Univ Tennessee Press
Location:
Knoxville
Subject:
Discovery and exploration
Subject:
History
Subject:
Frontier and pioneer life
Subject:
Kentucky
Subject:
Appalachian Region
Subject:
United States - 18th Century
Subject:
Tennessee
Subject:
Southwest, old
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
Expeditions & Discoveries
Subject:
Tennessee History.
Subject:
Southwest, Old History.
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Subject:
US History-General
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Appalachian Echoes Non-Fiction
Series Volume:
107-623
Publication Date:
20030325
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
424
Dimensions:
8.50 x 5.50 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Appalachian Frontier
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Product details 424 pages University of Tennessee Press - English 9781572332157 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
John Anthony Caruso’s The Appalachian Frontier, first published in 1959, captures the drama and sweep of a nation at the beginning of its westward expansion. Bringing to life the region’s history from its earliest seventeenth-century scouting parties to the admission of Tennessee to the Union in 1796, Caruso describes the exchange of ideas, values, and cultural traits that marked Appalachia as a unique frontier.

Looking at the rich and mountainous land between the Ohio and Tennessee Rivers, The Appalachian Frontier follows the story of the Long Hunters in Kentucky; the struggles of the Regulators in North Carolina; the founding of the Watauga, Transylvania, Franklin, and Cumberland settlements; the siege of Boonesboro; and the patterns and challenges of frontier life. While narrating the gripping stories of such figures as Daniel Boone, George Rogers Clark, and Chief Logan, Caruso combines social, political, and economic history into a comprehensive overview of the early mountain South.

In his new introduction, John C. Inscoe examines how this work exemplified the so-called consensus school of history that arose in the United States during the cold war. Unabashedly celebratory in his analysis of American nation building, Caruso shows how the development of Appalachia fit into the grander scheme of the evolution of the country. While there is much in The Appalachian Frontier that contemporary historians would regard as one-sided and romanticized, Inscoe points out that “those of us immersed so deeply in the study of the region and its people sometimes tend to forget that the white settlement of the mountain south in the eighteenth century was not merely the chronological foundation of the Appalachian experience. As Caruso so vividly demonstrates, it is also represented a vital—even defining—stage in the American progression across the continent.”

The

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