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The Sand Cafe

The Sand Cafe Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Dhahran Palace Hotel, Saudi Arabia, 1991. The US forces are massing on the border with Iraq, preparing to throw Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait. Men and material are arriving daily, helicopters and armor are training in the desert sand. There are rumors of Scud missiles, talk of the possibility of chemical attack, but in fact, nothing is really happening. With no story to report, the press is getting restive. The Sand Café is a satire of modern war reporting that mercilessly exposes the life of the foreign correspondent: endless scurrying trips in pursuit of a really big story, gathering frustration, brewing jealousy directed towards other reporters, especially those from better financed TV networks, and the stale smell of damp rot that comes from a combination of leaking air-conditioning and wretched carpeting in the hotel where the entire bedraggled press corps is housed. Boredom massages idle thoughts into wild excesses, even in a country that officially bans the sale of alcohol. Neil MacFarquhar, a veteran of the Middle East foreign press corps, has written a woundingly witty black comedy of those who bring us news from the front lines, exposing their vanities, rivalries and petty distractions. Love, lust for fame and the magnificent gilded hypocrisy of the regime in Saudi make this novel as revealing as it is compelling.

Synopsis:

A fierce, funny debut novel of journalists at war— or waiting for one that never quite arrives— based on the Gulf War experiences of a renowned New York Times correspondent

Synopsis:

Dhahran Palace Hotel, Saudi Arabia, 1991. The U.S. forces are massing on the border with Iraq, preparing to throw Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait. There are rumors of SCUD missiles, talk of the possibility of chemical attack, but in fact, nothing is really happening. With no story to report, the press is getting restive. The Sand Cafe is a satire of modern war reporting that mercilessly exposes the life of the foreign correspondent: endless trips in pursuit of a really big story, gathering frustration, and brewing jealousy directed towards other reporters. Neil MacFarquhar, a veteran of the Middle East foreign press corps, has written a woundingly witty black comedy of those who bring us news from the front lines.

About the Author

Neil MacFarquhar's exposure to the Middle East started early, even before he entered first grade in Marsa Brega, Libya and continued through Stanford University, where his senior thesis focused on the Arab oil embargo as an economic weapon. He has worked as a correspondent in the Arab world for more than twelve years, including the last five as the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times. Fluent in Arabic and French, his next assignment for the Times will be Paris.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781586484347
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Subject:
General
Author:
Macfarquhar, Neil
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Americans
Subject:
Persian gulf war, 1991
Subject:
War stories
Subject:
Humorous fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20070631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 17.8 oz

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Science and Mathematics » Energy » General

The Sand Cafe
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$ In Stock
Product details 384 pages PublicAffairs - English 9781586484347 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
A fierce, funny debut novel of journalists at war— or waiting for one that never quite arrives— based on the Gulf War experiences of a renowned New York Times correspondent
"Synopsis" by , Dhahran Palace Hotel, Saudi Arabia, 1991. The U.S. forces are massing on the border with Iraq, preparing to throw Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait. There are rumors of SCUD missiles, talk of the possibility of chemical attack, but in fact, nothing is really happening. With no story to report, the press is getting restive. The Sand Cafe is a satire of modern war reporting that mercilessly exposes the life of the foreign correspondent: endless trips in pursuit of a really big story, gathering frustration, and brewing jealousy directed towards other reporters. Neil MacFarquhar, a veteran of the Middle East foreign press corps, has written a woundingly witty black comedy of those who bring us news from the front lines.
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