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6 Remote Warehouse World History- Greece

The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales: The "Iliad, the "Odyssey, and the Migration of Myth

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The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales: The "Iliad, the "Odyssey, and the Migration of Myth Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Compelling evidence that the events of Homer's andlt;Iandgt;Iliadandlt;/Iandgt; and andlt;Iandgt;Odysseyandlt;/Iandgt; took place in the Baltic and not the Mediterraneanandlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;and#8226; Reveals how a climate change forced the migration of a people and their myth to ancient Greece andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;and#8226; Identifies the true geographic sites of Troy and Ithaca in the Baltic Sea and Calypso's Isle in the North Atlantic Oceanandlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer's andlt;Iandgt;Iliadandlt;/Iandgt; and andlt;Iandgt;Odysseyandlt;/Iandgt;, given that his descriptions are at odds with the geography of the areas he purportedly describes. Inspired by Plutarch's remark that Calypso's Isle was only five days sailing from Britain, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in the northern Baltic Sea. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Using meticulous geographical analysis, Vinci shows that many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can still be identified in the geographic landscape of the Baltic. He explains how the dense, foggy weather described by Ulysses befits northern not Mediterranean climes, and how battles lasting through the night would easily have been possible in the long days of the Baltic summer. Vinci's meteorological analysis reveals how a decline of the andquot;climatic optimumandquot; caused the blond seafarers to migrate south to warmer climates, where they rebuilt their original world in the Mediterranean. Through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the feats performed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved and handed down to the following ages, only later to be codified by Homer in the andlt;Iandgt;Iliadandlt;/Iandgt; and the andlt;Iandgt;Odysseyandlt;/Iandgt;.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Felice Vinci offers a key to open many doors that allow us to consider the age-old question of the Indo-European diaspora and the origin of the Greek civilization from a new perspective.

Book News Annotation:

An Italian nuclear engineer with an extensive background in Latin and Greek, Vinci solves geographical disparities that have puzzled scholars for millennia by arguing that the earliest epic poems in Western literature are not set in Greece at all, but in ancient Scandinavia. He discusses the world of Ulysses, the world of Troy, the world of the Achaeans, and the migration of myth from the Hyperborean paradise. He himself, along with Amalia Di Francesco translated Omero nel Baltico, which was published in 1995 by Fratelli Palombi Editions, Rome.
Annotation 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

An Italian nuclear engineer with an extensive background in Latin and Greek, Vinci solves geographical disparities that have puzzled scholars for millennia by arguing that the earliest epic poems in Western literature are not set in Greece at all, but in ancient Scandinavia. He discusses the world of Ulysses, the world of Troy, the world of the Achaeans, and the migration of myth from the Hyperborean paradise. He himself, along with Amalia Di Francesco translated Omero nel Baltico, which was published in 1995 by Fratelli Palombi Editions, Rome. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

HISTORY / CLASSICAL STUDIES?It is hard to overstate the impact, both scholarly and imaginative, of Vinci's compellingly argued thesis. . . . Scholars will be rethinking Indo-European studies from the ground up and readers of Homer's epics will enter fresh realms of delight as they look anew at the world in which Homer's heroes first breathed and moved.? PROFESSOR WILLIAM MULLEN, department of classics, Bard College ?Powerful, methodical, important, and convincing . . .? ALFRED DE GRAZIA, author of Burning of Troy For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, finding the author's descriptions at odds with the geography he purportedly describes. Inspired by Plutarch's remark that Calypso's island home was only five days? sail from Britain, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in northern Europe's Baltic Sea. Using meticulous geographical analysis, Vinci shows that many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can be identified in the geographic landscape of the Baltic. He explains how the cool, foggy weather described by Ulysses matches that of northern climes rather than the sunny, warm Mediterranean and Aegean, and how battles lasting through the night would easily have been possible in the long days of the Baltic summer. Vinci's meteorological analysis reveals how the ?climatic optimum?--a long period of weather that resulted in a much milder northern Europe--declined and thus caused the blond seafarers of the Baltic to migrate south to warmer climates, where they rebuilt their original world in the Mediterranean. Through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the featsperformed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved and handed down, ultimately to be codified by Homer as the Iliad and the Odyssey. In The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales, Felice Vinci offers a key to open many doors, allowing us to consider from a new perspective the age-old question of the Indo-European diaspora and the origin not only of Greek civilization, but of Western civilization as a whole. FELICE VINCI is a nuclear engineer with an extensive background in Latin and Greek studies. Since 1992 he has been researching his theory on the northern origin of Greek mythology. He lives in Rome.

Synopsis:

Compelling evidence that the events of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey took place in the Baltic and not the Mediterranean

• Reveals how a climate change forced the migration of a people and their myth to ancient Greece

• Identifies the true geographic sites of Troy and Ithaca in the Baltic Sea and Calypso's Isle in the North Atlantic Ocean

For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, given that his descriptions are at odds with the geography of the areas he purportedly describes. Inspired by Plutarch's remark that Calypso's Isle was only five days sailing from Britain, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in the northern Baltic Sea.

Using meticulous geographical analysis, Vinci shows that many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can still be identified in the geographic landscape of the Baltic. He explains how the dense, foggy weather described by Ulysses befits northern not Mediterranean climes, and how battles lasting through the night would easily have been possible in the long days of the Baltic summer. Vinci's meteorological analysis reveals how a decline of the "climatic optimum" caused the blond seafarers to migrate south to warmer climates, where they rebuilt their original world in the Mediterranean. Through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the feats performed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved and handed down to the following ages, only later to be codified by Homer in the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Felice Vinci offers a key to open many doors that allow us to consider the age-old question of the Indo-European diaspora and the origin of the Greek civilization from a new perspective.

Synopsis:

For years scholars have debated the geographical incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Using meticulous analysis, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in the northern Baltic Sea, allowing us to reconsider the age-old question of Indo-European diaspora and the origin of the Greek civilization from a new perspective.

About the Author

Felice Vinci is a nuclear engineer with an extensive background in Latin and Greek studies, who has been researching his theory on the northern origin of Greek mythology since 1992. He lives in Rome.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Foreword by Joscelyn Godwin

Introduction: The Key to Finding Homer’s World

PART ONE:   The World of Ulysses

1    Ulysses Homeward Bound: The Island of Ogygia and the Land of Scheria

2    Ithaca’s Archipelago: Dulichium, Same, and Zacynthus

3    Ithaca

   The Adventures of Ulysses

5    Ulysses and Northern Mythology

PART TWO:  The World of Troy

 6    If “This Is Not the Site of the Ancient Ilium,” Where Was Troy?

   War!

   Neighboring Lands and Islands

PART THREE:   The World of the Achaeans

9    Climate and Chronology: The Northern Origin of the Mycenaeans

10   The Catalog of Ships: The Northern Achaean World 

11   The Regions of the Peloponnese

12   Crete, the River Egypt, Pharos, and Phthia

PART FOUR:   The Migration of Myth from the Hyperborean Paradise

13   Finding the Home of the Gods 

14   Climate Change and the Migration of Culture

15   Solar, Stellar, and Lunar Myths

Conclusion

Appendix: The Bible and the Northern Bronze Age

Notes

Bibliography 

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594770524
Subtitle:
The andlt;iandgt;Iliad,andlt;/iandgt; the andlt;iandgt;Odyssey,andlt;/iandgt; and the Migration of Myth
Author:
Vinci, Felice
Translator:
De Francesco, Amalia
Publisher:
Inner Traditions
Subject:
Poetry
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Ancient - Greece
Subject:
Epic poetry, Greek
Subject:
Trojan War
Subject:
Mythical Civilizations
Subject:
Trojan War -- Literature and the war.
Subject:
Epic poetry, Greek -- History and criticism.
Subject:
World History-Ancient Near East
Subject:
CLASSICAL STUDIES;HISTORY;HOMER S;STUDIES
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20051220
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 bandamp;w illustrations
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9.00 x 6.00 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
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History and Social Science » World History » Greece
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales: The "Iliad, the "Odyssey, and the Migration of Myth New Trade Paper
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Product details 384 pages Inner Traditions International - English 9781594770524 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , HISTORY / CLASSICAL STUDIES?It is hard to overstate the impact, both scholarly and imaginative, of Vinci's compellingly argued thesis. . . . Scholars will be rethinking Indo-European studies from the ground up and readers of Homer's epics will enter fresh realms of delight as they look anew at the world in which Homer's heroes first breathed and moved.? PROFESSOR WILLIAM MULLEN, department of classics, Bard College ?Powerful, methodical, important, and convincing . . .? ALFRED DE GRAZIA, author of Burning of Troy For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, finding the author's descriptions at odds with the geography he purportedly describes. Inspired by Plutarch's remark that Calypso's island home was only five days? sail from Britain, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in northern Europe's Baltic Sea. Using meticulous geographical analysis, Vinci shows that many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can be identified in the geographic landscape of the Baltic. He explains how the cool, foggy weather described by Ulysses matches that of northern climes rather than the sunny, warm Mediterranean and Aegean, and how battles lasting through the night would easily have been possible in the long days of the Baltic summer. Vinci's meteorological analysis reveals how the ?climatic optimum?--a long period of weather that resulted in a much milder northern Europe--declined and thus caused the blond seafarers of the Baltic to migrate south to warmer climates, where they rebuilt their original world in the Mediterranean. Through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the featsperformed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved and handed down, ultimately to be codified by Homer as the Iliad and the Odyssey. In The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales, Felice Vinci offers a key to open many doors, allowing us to consider from a new perspective the age-old question of the Indo-European diaspora and the origin not only of Greek civilization, but of Western civilization as a whole. FELICE VINCI is a nuclear engineer with an extensive background in Latin and Greek studies. Since 1992 he has been researching his theory on the northern origin of Greek mythology. He lives in Rome.
"Synopsis" by , Compelling evidence that the events of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey took place in the Baltic and not the Mediterranean

• Reveals how a climate change forced the migration of a people and their myth to ancient Greece

• Identifies the true geographic sites of Troy and Ithaca in the Baltic Sea and Calypso's Isle in the North Atlantic Ocean

For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, given that his descriptions are at odds with the geography of the areas he purportedly describes. Inspired by Plutarch's remark that Calypso's Isle was only five days sailing from Britain, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in the northern Baltic Sea.

Using meticulous geographical analysis, Vinci shows that many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can still be identified in the geographic landscape of the Baltic. He explains how the dense, foggy weather described by Ulysses befits northern not Mediterranean climes, and how battles lasting through the night would easily have been possible in the long days of the Baltic summer. Vinci's meteorological analysis reveals how a decline of the "climatic optimum" caused the blond seafarers to migrate south to warmer climates, where they rebuilt their original world in the Mediterranean. Through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the feats performed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved and handed down to the following ages, only later to be codified by Homer in the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Felice Vinci offers a key to open many doors that allow us to consider the age-old question of the Indo-European diaspora and the origin of the Greek civilization from a new perspective.

"Synopsis" by , For years scholars have debated the geographical incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Using meticulous analysis, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in the northern Baltic Sea, allowing us to reconsider the age-old question of Indo-European diaspora and the origin of the Greek civilization from a new perspective.
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