25 Books to Read Before You Die
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Q&A | August 19, 2014

Richard Kadrey: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Richard Kadrey



Describe your latest book. The Getaway God is the sixth book in the Sandman Slim series. In it, the very unholy nephilim, James Stark, aka Sandman... Continue »
  1. $17.49 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$10.95
List price: $16.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

Zeroville

by

Zeroville Cover

ISBN13: 9781933372396
ISBN10: 1933372397
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $10.95!

 

Review-A-Day

"In Zeroville Steve Erickson weaves a gripping, yet free-floating and dizzyingly surreal narrative that is frequently punctuated with Hollywood greats named and unnamed, real and imagined. Half of the fun is trying to connect the less obvious incidents and characters with their real-life analogues." Gerry Donaghy, Powells.com (read the entire Powells.com review)

"Since 1985, with his first novel, Days Between Stations, and now with Zeroville, his eighth — and best — novel, Erickson has been a singular voice in American fiction, for my money our most imaginative native novelist....There's no denying the hallucinatory nature of Erickson's novels. But even when they spiral off into the strangest territory, they always make emotional sense..." Charles Taylor, The Nation (read the entire review from The Nation)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On the same August day in 1969 that a crazed hippie "family" led by Charles Manson commits five savage murders in the canyons above Los Angeles, a young ex-communicated seminarian arrives with the images of Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift — "the two most beautiful people in the history of the movies" — tattooed on his head. At once childlike and violent, Vikar is not a cinéaste but "cineautistic," sleeping at night in the Roosevelt Hotel where he's haunted by the ghost of D. W. Griffith, and behind the screen of the Chinese Theatre where "images from the movie fly over him as though he's lying at the end of a runway, below an endless stream of jetliners landing." Vikar has stepped into the vortex of a culture in upheaval: strange drugs that frighten him, a strange sexuality that consumes him, a strange music he doesn't understand. Over the course of the Seventies and into the Eighties, as the old studios crumble before the onslaught of a new, renegade generation, Vikar pursues his obsession with film from one screening to the next and through a series of cinema-besotted conversations and encounters with starlets, burglars, guerrillas, escorts, teenage punks and veteran film editors, only to discover a secret whose clues lie in every film ever made, and only to find that we don't dream the Movies but rather they dream us.

Review:

"Set primarily in Los Angeles from the late 1960s through 1980s, this darkly funny, wise but flawed novel from Erickson (Arc d'X) focuses on our collective fascination with movies. Vikar Jerome, whose almost deranged film fixation manifests itself in the images of Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift tattooed on his bald head, wanders around Hollywood, where he gets mistaken for a perp in the Charles Manson murders and is robbed by a man who turns out to be a fellow film buff. After Vikar becomes a film editor, he's kidnapped by revolutionaries in Spain who want him to edit their propaganda film. Later, he wins a Cannes Film Festival award in France and receives an Oscar nomination, with strange consequences. Vikar repeatedly crosses paths with actress Soledad Palladin and her daughter, Zazi, though ambiguities in his relationship with this enigmatic pair, along with a recurring dream of his, derail this black comedy toward the end. The sudden point-of-view shift and possible supernatural element jar in an otherwise brilliant, often hilarious love song to film." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"My first encounter with Steve Erickson was 'Arc d'X,' which I devoured in 1993 while fatigued and feverish and bedridden. In that context, it became one of the great reading experiences of my life, virtually phantasmagoric. But I don't know if 'Arc d'X' would have seemed any less hallucinogenic under normal conditions. Over his entire career Erickson has challenged readers with a fiercely intelligent... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Although cineasts are the obvious audience for this atmospheric novel (it contains literally hundreds of references to obscure and classic films), others may find themselves falling under its spell, for its effect is much like that of a strange but very beautiful art film." Booklist

Review:

"[Vikar's] adventures read like a fable inspired by the French New Wave. Steve Erickson's Zeroville inhabits a sweet spot where fiction and film criticism merge, wryly imagining a world in which house burglars parse John Ford Westerns. (Grade: B+)" Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"A novel that will especially appeal to cinephiles, for Erickson makes more allusions to film, starting with his Godard-like title, than perhaps any novelist you've read." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Erickson is as unique and vital and pure a voice as American fiction has produced." Jonathan Lethem

Review:

"That Zeroville...accomplishes such gait in 352 pages of mostly short, numbered vignettes, is yet another facet of its unmistakable, so sleek brilliance....Zeroville is addictive. It is a puzzle that lives inside your head." Blake Butler, Bookslut.com

Review:

"Erickson...manages to wipe clean the presumptions typically guiding the Hollywood Novel, which suggest either that Hollywood is irredeemably corrupt or that moviemaking is a tainted beauty requiring the ministrations of a pure artistic vision to recover its virtue. He embeds in his story a deeply thoughtful look at the art of filmmaking, not the pathology of the film industry." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Terse, fanciful, dreamlike and sometimes nightmarish, this remarkable novel will test you and tease you and leave you desperate to line up at Film Forum (or hunt down Erickson's top 150 on DVD) so you can submit yourself to the celluloid bonds that hold Vikar and his creator such willing captives." New York Times

Review:

"Just when you thought that the Hollywood novel had fizzled out with all the eclat of an inebriated Mickey Rourke driving through Miami on a Vespa, another writer has come along with high-octane fuel for the form." Philadelphia Inquirer

Review:

"[Erickson's] eighth — and best — novel....What Erickson is celebrating here isn't any sort of pantheon (Vikar finds his dream frame in both great films and dreck) but the ability of movies to plug right into our deepest fears and raptures." Charles Taylor, The Nation

Synopsis:

A film-obsessed ex-seminarian with images of Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift tattooed on his head arrives on Hollywood Boulevard in 1969. Vikar Jerome enters the vortex of a cultural transformation: rock and roll, sex, drugs, and — most important to him — the decline of the movie studios and the rise of independent directors. Jerome becomes a film editor of astonishing vision. Through encounters with former starlets, burglars, political guerillas, punk musicians, and veteran filmmakers, he discovers the secret that lies in every movie ever made.

About the Author

Los Angeles writer Steve Erickson was born in Santa Monica in 1950, and has published seven novels and two books of non-fiction. Currently a teacher in the CalArts MFA writing program, a film critic for Los Angeles magazine, and the editor of Black Clock, he received a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation in 2007.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

LouGreeley, January 2, 2010 (view all comments by LouGreeley)
Steve Erickson is...not definable. But I'm never disappointed. Never.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
wescoat, November 13, 2008 (view all comments by wescoat)
Zeroville is what happens when a brilliant film critic writes a brilliant novel. Erickson captures the essence of '70s-era Hollywood in darkly poetic fashion, using the perspective of an odd, tragic cinephile named Vikar to reveal how movies shape our lives and how our lives shape movies.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)
emp, October 7, 2008 (view all comments by emp)
Zeroville takes a lot of chances and weaves one of the strongest contemporary myths I've read. It has an interest in Hollywood nostalgia and a sensibility of epic surrealism...
I really don't care about old Hollywood movies, and there are long, long passages in which the protagonist ponders them/converses about them. The sections seemed mostly expository, a chance for Erickson and film geek readers to geek out together, and they didn't really hurt my enjoyment of the text.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781933372396
Author:
Erickson, Steve
Publisher:
Europa Editions
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Motion pictures
Subject:
California
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Humorous fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass Market
Publication Date:
November 2007
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.12x5.30x1.08 in. .94 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

Other books you might like

  1. Tree of Smoke: A Novel
    Used Hardcover $4.50
  2. Spook Country
    Sale Trade Paper $2.95
  3. Halting State
    Used Mass Market $3.95
  4. Our Ecstatic Days Sale Trade Paper $7.98
  5. Rant: The Oral Biography of Buster Casey
    Used Trade Paper $7.50
  6. Thirteen Used Trade Paper $10.95

Related Subjects


Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Zeroville Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Europa Editions - English 9781933372396 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Set primarily in Los Angeles from the late 1960s through 1980s, this darkly funny, wise but flawed novel from Erickson (Arc d'X) focuses on our collective fascination with movies. Vikar Jerome, whose almost deranged film fixation manifests itself in the images of Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift tattooed on his bald head, wanders around Hollywood, where he gets mistaken for a perp in the Charles Manson murders and is robbed by a man who turns out to be a fellow film buff. After Vikar becomes a film editor, he's kidnapped by revolutionaries in Spain who want him to edit their propaganda film. Later, he wins a Cannes Film Festival award in France and receives an Oscar nomination, with strange consequences. Vikar repeatedly crosses paths with actress Soledad Palladin and her daughter, Zazi, though ambiguities in his relationship with this enigmatic pair, along with a recurring dream of his, derail this black comedy toward the end. The sudden point-of-view shift and possible supernatural element jar in an otherwise brilliant, often hilarious love song to film." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "In Zeroville Steve Erickson weaves a gripping, yet free-floating and dizzyingly surreal narrative that is frequently punctuated with Hollywood greats named and unnamed, real and imagined. Half of the fun is trying to connect the less obvious incidents and characters with their real-life analogues." (read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review A Day" by , "Since 1985, with his first novel, Days Between Stations, and now with Zeroville, his eighth — and best — novel, Erickson has been a singular voice in American fiction, for my money our most imaginative native novelist....There's no denying the hallucinatory nature of Erickson's novels. But even when they spiral off into the strangest territory, they always make emotional sense..." (read the entire review from The Nation)
"Review" by , "Although cineasts are the obvious audience for this atmospheric novel (it contains literally hundreds of references to obscure and classic films), others may find themselves falling under its spell, for its effect is much like that of a strange but very beautiful art film."
"Review" by , "[Vikar's] adventures read like a fable inspired by the French New Wave. Steve Erickson's Zeroville inhabits a sweet spot where fiction and film criticism merge, wryly imagining a world in which house burglars parse John Ford Westerns. (Grade: B+)"
"Review" by , "A novel that will especially appeal to cinephiles, for Erickson makes more allusions to film, starting with his Godard-like title, than perhaps any novelist you've read."
"Review" by , "Erickson is as unique and vital and pure a voice as American fiction has produced."
"Review" by , "That Zeroville...accomplishes such gait in 352 pages of mostly short, numbered vignettes, is yet another facet of its unmistakable, so sleek brilliance....Zeroville is addictive. It is a puzzle that lives inside your head."
"Review" by , "Erickson...manages to wipe clean the presumptions typically guiding the Hollywood Novel, which suggest either that Hollywood is irredeemably corrupt or that moviemaking is a tainted beauty requiring the ministrations of a pure artistic vision to recover its virtue. He embeds in his story a deeply thoughtful look at the art of filmmaking, not the pathology of the film industry."
"Review" by , "Terse, fanciful, dreamlike and sometimes nightmarish, this remarkable novel will test you and tease you and leave you desperate to line up at Film Forum (or hunt down Erickson's top 150 on DVD) so you can submit yourself to the celluloid bonds that hold Vikar and his creator such willing captives."
"Review" by , "Just when you thought that the Hollywood novel had fizzled out with all the eclat of an inebriated Mickey Rourke driving through Miami on a Vespa, another writer has come along with high-octane fuel for the form."
"Review" by , "[Erickson's] eighth — and best — novel....What Erickson is celebrating here isn't any sort of pantheon (Vikar finds his dream frame in both great films and dreck) but the ability of movies to plug right into our deepest fears and raptures."
"Synopsis" by , A film-obsessed ex-seminarian with images of Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift tattooed on his head arrives on Hollywood Boulevard in 1969. Vikar Jerome enters the vortex of a cultural transformation: rock and roll, sex, drugs, and — most important to him — the decline of the movie studios and the rise of independent directors. Jerome becomes a film editor of astonishing vision. Through encounters with former starlets, burglars, political guerillas, punk musicians, and veteran filmmakers, he discovers the secret that lies in every movie ever made.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.