Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 18, 2014

Ian Leslie: IMG Empathic Curiosity



Today, we wonder anxiously if digital media is changing our brains. But if there's any time in history when our mental operations changed... Continue »
  1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$19.50
List price: $29.00
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Burnside Literature- A to Z

This title in other editions

A Moment in the Sun

by

A Moment in the Sun Cover

ISBN13: 9781936365180
ISBN10: 1936365189
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 2 left in stock at $19.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Its 1897. Gold has been discovered in the Yukon. New York is under the sway of Hearst and Pulitzer. And in a few months, an American battleship will explode in a Cuban harbor, plunging the U.S. into war. Spanning five years and half a dozen countries, this is the unforgettable story of that extraordinary moment: the turn of the twentieth century, as seen by one of the greatest storytellers of our time.

Shot through with a lyrical intensity and stunning detail that recall Doctorow and Deadwood both, A Moment in the Sun takes the whole era in its sights—from the white-racist coup in Wilmington, North Carolina to the bloody dawn of U.S. interventionism in the Philippines. Beginning with Hod Brackenridge searching for his fortune in the North, and hurtling forward on the voices of a breathtaking range of men and women—Royal Scott, an African American infantryman whose life outside the military has been destroyed; Diosdado Concepcíon, a Filipino insurgent fighting against his countrys new colonizers; and more than a dozen others, Mark Twain and President McKinleys assassin among them—this is a story as big as its subject: history rediscovered through the lives of the people who made it happen.

Review:

"Though known best as a filmmaker (Eight Men Out), Sayles is also an accomplished novelist (Union Dues), whose latest will stand among the finest work on his impressive résumé. Weighing in at nearly 1,000 pages, the behemoth recalls E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime, Pynchon's Against the Day, and Dos Passos's USA trilogy, tracking mostly unconnected characters whose collective stories create a vast, kaleidoscopic panorama of the turn of the last century. Hod Brackenridge is a miner who gets swindled in the Alaskan gold rush, is strong-armed into a boxing match, and ends up on the run after his opponent dies in the ring. Diosdado, son of a Spanish diplomat, turns against his country and the United States to fight for independence in the Philippines. The most emotionally connected story line involves the black American soldiers who breeze through fighting in Cuba but get stuck in a quagmire in the Philippines while their families back home in Wilmington, N.C., endure a campaign of murder and intimidation that forces an affluent and educated black family out of their home and into poverty in New York City. Naturally, there are cameos — Mark Twain, president McKinley — and period details aplenty that help alleviate the occasional slow patches — indeed, Hod's story line loses steam toward the end — but the flaws and muck of this big, rangy novel are part of what make it so wonderful. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"In his most spectacular work of fiction to date, filmmaker Sayles combines wonder and outrage in a vigorous dramatization of overlooked and downright shameful aspects of turn-of-the-nineteenth-century America.… Crackling with rare historical details, spiked with caustic humor, and fueled by incandescent wrath over racism, sexism, and serial injustice against working people, Sayles’ hard-driving yet penetrating and compassionate saga explicates the 'fever dream' of commerce, the crimes of war, and the dream of redemption."Booklist(Starred Review)

Review:

"Sayles’s cat-squasher of a book... pulls all his characters onto a huge global stage, setting them into motion as America goes to war against Spain and takes its first giant step toward becoming a world power. The narrative is full of historical lessons of the Howard Zinn/Studs Terkel radical-revisionist school, but Sayles is too good a writer to be a propagandist; his stories tell their own lessons and many will be surprises... [A Moment in the Sun is] a long time in coming, with an ending that's one of the most memorable in recent literature. A superb novel. Kirkus(Starred Review)

About the Author

John Sayless previous novels include Pride of the Bimbos, Los Gusanos, and the National Book Award–nominated Union Dues. He has directed seventeen feature films, including Matewan, Lone Star, and Eight Men Out, and received two Academy Award nominations. His latest film, Amigo, was completed in 2010.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

Lindsay Waite, August 18, 2013 (view all comments by Lindsay Waite)
It took me time to read this book, close to 1000 pages. This epic takes the reader from the gold rush in the Yukon to America's incursions in Cuba and then the Philippines, with lengthy stays in Wilmington, NC, New York City, and other parts of the United States around the turn of the 20th century. Sayles captures the lives of regular people, communicating in authentic voices and reflecting their times. I can only say that it is an incredible look at history through individuals and families caught up in the times. I particularly was intrigued by the Lunceford family. Driven from Wilmington by racists, Dr. Lunceford attempts to start life anew in New York peddling cures door-to-door, while his son Junior joins the Army, and pianist Jessie ends up working in a factory in dehumanizing conditions. Grimness, pain, and sorrow abound, but there is some joy as well. As I read the final chapters, I was sorry these tales of many were coming to an end. The final pages of the book shock and lead to much reflection about what was just read. For those interested in authentic historical fiction peopled by well-rounded characters (interspersed with true figures from history), this book is highly recommended.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Michael C, September 21, 2011 (view all comments by Michael C)
An amazing achievement. Sayles manages to weave together a half dozen major characters and story lines, all while capturing all the idioms perfectly, subtly illustrating huge social and historical problems, and giving readers a history lesson about the rise of U.S. imperialism. And, quite unlike so much other current historical fiction, the writing is utterly unpretentious. Sayles is loyal to the story and the characters and the ideas, not his own ego.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Peter Saucerman, July 8, 2011 (view all comments by Peter Saucerman)
There is something exceptionally aggressive about a hardbound novel as big as a Webster's dictionary - 'What does this guy have to prove?' one might ask.

Two or three chapters in, and the story is beginning to fly along, the exquisitely crafted prose is flowing, characters are coming to life and historic scenes are being shaped in vivid detail. John Sayles writes great screenplays and has supported his independent film-making career with lots of screenplay writing for others, so it shouldn't be a surprise that the man can write very well. It's not so much the story line as the finely wrought character studies that make this a great and pleasurable read. But there is the matter of that massive tome - hard to prop up in bed, impossible to carry on a bike, conspicuous - ostentatious even - to be seen in a library, coffee shop or public park reading such a thing. If you have strong wrists for supporting a 5-pounder for hours on end, this is a great summer read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781936365180
Author:
Sayles, John
Publisher:
McSweeney's
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20110517
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Pages:
968
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. There Is No Year
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  2. The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake
    Used Hardcover $5.95
  3. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  4. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation Used Trade Paper $10.50
  5. The Faithful Spy Used Hardcover $3.50
  6. Don't Think of an Elephant: Know...
    Used Trade Paper $4.95

Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Adventure

A Moment in the Sun Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.50 In Stock
Product details 968 pages McSweeney's - English 9781936365180 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Though known best as a filmmaker (Eight Men Out), Sayles is also an accomplished novelist (Union Dues), whose latest will stand among the finest work on his impressive résumé. Weighing in at nearly 1,000 pages, the behemoth recalls E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime, Pynchon's Against the Day, and Dos Passos's USA trilogy, tracking mostly unconnected characters whose collective stories create a vast, kaleidoscopic panorama of the turn of the last century. Hod Brackenridge is a miner who gets swindled in the Alaskan gold rush, is strong-armed into a boxing match, and ends up on the run after his opponent dies in the ring. Diosdado, son of a Spanish diplomat, turns against his country and the United States to fight for independence in the Philippines. The most emotionally connected story line involves the black American soldiers who breeze through fighting in Cuba but get stuck in a quagmire in the Philippines while their families back home in Wilmington, N.C., endure a campaign of murder and intimidation that forces an affluent and educated black family out of their home and into poverty in New York City. Naturally, there are cameos — Mark Twain, president McKinley — and period details aplenty that help alleviate the occasional slow patches — indeed, Hod's story line loses steam toward the end — but the flaws and muck of this big, rangy novel are part of what make it so wonderful. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "In his most spectacular work of fiction to date, filmmaker Sayles combines wonder and outrage in a vigorous dramatization of overlooked and downright shameful aspects of turn-of-the-nineteenth-century America.… Crackling with rare historical details, spiked with caustic humor, and fueled by incandescent wrath over racism, sexism, and serial injustice against working people, Sayles’ hard-driving yet penetrating and compassionate saga explicates the 'fever dream' of commerce, the crimes of war, and the dream of redemption."
"Review" by , "Sayles’s cat-squasher of a book... pulls all his characters onto a huge global stage, setting them into motion as America goes to war against Spain and takes its first giant step toward becoming a world power. The narrative is full of historical lessons of the Howard Zinn/Studs Terkel radical-revisionist school, but Sayles is too good a writer to be a propagandist; his stories tell their own lessons and many will be surprises... [A Moment in the Sun is] a long time in coming, with an ending that's one of the most memorable in recent literature. A superb novel.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.