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Vintage Ford

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

COMMUNIST

My mother once had a boyfriend named Glen Baxter. This was in 1961. We-my mother and I-were living in the little house my father had left her up the Sun River, near Victory, Montana, west of Great Falls. My mother was thirty-two at the time. I was sixteen. Glen Baxter was somewhere in the middle, between us, though I cannot be exact about it.

We were living then off the proceeds of my father's life insurance policies, with my mother doing some part-time waitressing work up in Great Falls and going to the bars in the evenings, which I know is where she met Glen Baxter. Sometimes he would come back with her and stay in her room at night, or she would call up from town and explain that she was staying with him in his little place on Lewis Street by the GN yards. She gave me his number every time, but I never called it. I think she probably thought that what she was doing was terrible, but simply couldn't help herself. I thought it was all right, though. Regular life it seemed, and still does. She was young, and I knew that even then.

Glen Baxter was a Communist and liked hunting, which he talked about a lot. Pheasants. Ducks. Deer. He killed all of them, he said. He had been to Vietnam as far back as then, and when he was in our house he often talked about shooting the animals over there-monkeys and beautiful parrots-using military guns just for sport. We did not know what Vietnam was then, and Glen, when he talked about that, referred to it only as "the Far East." I think now he must've been in the CIA and been disillusioned by something he saw or found out about and been thrown out, but that kind of thing did not matter to us. He was a tall, dark-eyed man with short black hair, and was usually in a good humor. He had gone halfway through college in Peoria, Illinois, he said, where he grew up. But when he was around our life he worked wheat farms as a ditcher, and stayed out of work winters and in the bars drinking with women like my mother, who had work and some money. It is not an uncommon life to lead in Montana.

What I want to explain happened in November. We had not been seeing Glen Baxter for some time. Two months had gone by. My mother knew other men, but she came home most days from work and stayed inside watching television in her bedroom and drinking beers. I asked about Glen once, and she said only that she didn't know where he was, and I assumed they had had a fight and that he was gone off on a flyer back to Illinois or Massachusetts, where he said he had relatives. I'll admit that I liked him. He had something on his mind always. He was a labor man as well as a Communist, and liked to say that the country was poisoned by the rich, and strong men would need to bring it to life again, and I liked that because my father had been a labor man, which was why we had a house to live in and money coming through. It was also true that I'd had a few boxing bouts by then-just with town boys and one with an Indian from Choteau-and there were some girlfriends I knew from that. I did not like my mother being around the house so much at night, and I wished Glen Baxter would come back, or that another man would come along and entertain her somewhere else.

At two o'clock on a Saturday, Glen drove up into our yard in a car. He had had a big brown Harley-Davidson that he rode most of the year, in his black-and-red irrigators and

Synopsis:

An introduction to the work of Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Ford includes excerpts from the novels The Sportswriter, Independence Day, and Piece of My Heart; "Communist," "Reunion," "Calling," and other short fiction; and the memoir "My Mother, in Memory." Original. 25,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

The author of five novels and two collections of stories, Richard Ford was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Independence Day, the first book to win both prizes. In 2001 he received the PEN/Malamud Award for excellence in short fiction.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Table of Contents

"Communist" from Rock Springs — "Reunion" from A multitude of sins — "Calling" from A multitude of sins — Selection from Independence Day — "The womanizer" from Women with men — "Rock Springs" from Rock Springs — My mother, in memory.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307429988
Publisher:
Vintage Books
Subject:
Fiction : Literary
Author:
Ford, Richard
Author:
Ford Richard
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20040106
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
200

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Vintage Ford
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 200 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780307429988 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An introduction to the work of Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Ford includes excerpts from the novels The Sportswriter, Independence Day, and Piece of My Heart; "Communist," "Reunion," "Calling," and other short fiction; and the memoir "My Mother, in Memory." Original. 25,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , The author of five novels and two collections of stories, Richard Ford was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Independence Day, the first book to win both prizes. In 2001 he received the PEN/Malamud Award for excellence in short fiction.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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