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Victory: An Island Tale

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Victory: An Island Tale Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

I

There is, as every schoolboy knows in this scientific age, a very close chemical relation between coal and diamonds. It is the reason, I believe, why some people allude to coal as black diamonds. Both these commodities represent wealth; but coal is a much less portable form of property. There is, from that point of view, a deplorable lack of concentration in coal. Now, if a coal-mine could be put into one's waistcoat pocket-but it can’t At the same time, there is a fascination in coal, the supreme commodity of the age in which we are camped like bewildered travellers in a garish, unrestful hotel. And I suppose those two considerations, the practical and the mystical, prevented Heyst-Axel Heyst—from going away.

The Tropical Belt Coal Company went into liquidation. The world of finance is a mysterious world in which, incredible as the fact may appear, evaporation precedes liquidation. First the capital evaporates, and then the company goes into liquidation. These are very unnatural physics, but they account for the persistent inertia of Heyst, at which we out there used to laugh among ourselves-but not inimically. An inert body can do no harm to any one, provokes no hostility, is scarcely worth derision. It may, indeed, be in the way sometimes; but this could not be said of Axel Heyst. He was out of everybody's way, as if he were perched on the highest peak of the Himalayas, and in a sense as conspicuous. Every one in that part of the world knew of him, dwelling on his little island. An island is but the top of a mountain. Axel Heyst, perched on it immovably, was surrounded, instead of the imponderable stormy and transparent ocean of air merging into infinity, by a tepid, shallow sea; a passionless offshoot of the great waters which embrace the continents of this globe. His most frequent visitors were shadows, the shadows of clouds, relieving the monotony of the inanimate, brooding sunshine of the tropics. His nearest neighbour-I am speaking now of things showing some sort of animation-was an indolent volcano which smoked faintly all day with its head just above the northern horizon, and at night levelled at him, from amongst the clear stars, a dull red glow, expanding and collapsing spasmodically like the end of a gigantic cigar puffed at intermittently in the dark. Axel Heyst was also a smoker; and when he lounged out on his veranda with his cheroot, the last thing before going to bed, he made in the night the same sort of glow and of the same size as that other one so many miles away.

In a sense, the volcano was company to him in the shades of the night-which were often too thick, one would think, to let a breath of air through. There was seldom enough wind to blow a feather along. On most evenings of the year Heyst could have sat outside with a naked candle to read one of the books left him by his late father. It was not a mean store. But he never did that. Afraid of mosquitoes, very likely. Neither was he ever tempted by the silence to address any casual remarks to the companion glow of the volcano. He was not mad. Queer chap-yes, that may have been said, and in fact was said; but there is a tremendous difference between the two, you will allow.

On the nights of full moon the silence around Samburan-the Round Island of the charts—was dazzling; and in the flood of cold light Heyst could see his immediate surroundings, which had the aspect of an abandoned settlement

Synopsis:

Baron Axel Heyst and his lover, Lena, a woman he has saved from a sordid life, share an idyllic existence on the island of Samburan until three intruders from Lena's past threaten to destroy their happiness.

Synopsis:

Peter Lancelot Mallios is an assistant professor of English and American Studies at the University of Maryland.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307432841
Subtitle:
An Island Tale
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Introduction:
Mallios, Peter
Edited by:
Peter Lancelot Mallios
Author:
Conrad, Joseph
Author:
Mallios, Peter Lancelot
Author:
Conrad Joseph
Author:
Peter Lancelot Mallios
Subject:
Fiction : General
Subject:
Fiction : Literary
Subject:
Abused women
Subject:
Women musicians
Subject:
General
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Indonesia
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20030708
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
349

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Victory: An Island Tale
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Product details 349 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780307432841 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Baron Axel Heyst and his lover, Lena, a woman he has saved from a sordid life, share an idyllic existence on the island of Samburan until three intruders from Lena's past threaten to destroy their happiness.
"Synopsis" by , Peter Lancelot Mallios is an assistant professor of English and American Studies at the University of Maryland.
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