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The Life and Death of Classical Music: Featuring the 100 Best and 20 Worst Recordings Ever Made

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The Life and Death of Classical Music: Featuring the 100 Best and 20 Worst Recordings Ever Made Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this compulsively readable, fascinating, and provocativeguide to classical music, Norman Lebrecht, one of the world’s most widely read cultural commentators tells the story of the rise of the classical recording industry from Caruso’s first notes to the heyday of Bernstein,Glenn Gould, Callas,and von Karajan.

Lebrecht compellingly demonstrates that classical recording has reached its end point–but this is not simply an expos? of decline and fall. It is, for the first time, the full story of a minor art form, analyzing thecultural revolution wrought by Schnabel, Toscanini, Callas, Rattle, the Three Tenors, and Charlotte Church. It is the story of how stars were made and broken by the record business; how a war criminal conspired witha concentration-camp victim to create a record empire; and how advancing technology, boardroom wars, public credulity and unscrupulous exploitation shaped the musical backdrop to our modern lives. The book ends with a suitable shrine to classical recording: the author’s critical selection of the 100 most important recordings–and the 20 most appalling.

Filled with memorable incidents and unforgettable personalities–from Goddard Lieberson, legendary head of CBS Masterworks who signed his letters as God; to Georg Solti, who turned the Chicago Symphony into “ the loudest symphony on earth”–this is at once the captivating story of the life and death of classical recording and an opinioned, insider’sguide to appreciating the genre, now and for years to come.

Synopsis:

Looks at the rise and fall of the classical music recording industry, from the first notes of Enrico Caruso; to the heyday of Bernstein, Could, Callas, and Karajan; to the industry's collapse in the wake of corporate control and the growth of "crossover," citing the finest one hundred and the worst twenty classical recordings ever made. Original. 30,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

In this compulsively readable, fascinating, and provocativeguide to classical music, Norman Lebrecht, one of the world's most widely read cultural commentators tells the story of the rise of the classical recording industry from Caruso's first notes to the heyday of Bernstein,Glenn Gould, Callas,and von Karajan.

Lebrecht compellingly demonstrates that classical recording has reached its end point but this is not simply an expos? of decline and fall. It is, for the first time, the full story of a minor art form, analyzing thecultural revolution wrought by Schnabel, Toscanini, Callas, Rattle, the Three Tenors, and Charlotte Church. It is the story of how stars were made and broken by the record business; how a war criminal conspired witha concentration-camp victim to create a record empire; and how advancing technology, boardroom wars, public credulity and unscrupulous exploitation shaped the musical backdrop to our modern lives. The book ends with a suitable shrine to classical recording: the

About the Author

Norman Lebrecht, assistant editor of the Evening Standard in London and presenter of BBC’s lebrecht.live, is a prolific writer on music and cultural affairs, whose weekly column has been called “required reading.” Lebrecht has written eleven books about music, and is also author of the novel The Song of Names, which won the Whitbread First Novel Award in 2003.

Table of Contents

Maestros — Masterpieces. 100 milestones of the recorded century — Madness. 20 recordings that should never have been made.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307487469
Subtitle:
Featuring the 100 Best and 20 Worst Recordings Ever Made
Publisher:
Anchor Books
Author:
Lebrecht, Norman
Author:
Norman Lebrecht
Subject:
Medical : History
Subject:
Music : Genres & Styles - Classical
Subject:
Music : History & Criticism - General
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Classical
Subject:
History & Criticism - General
Subject:
Discography & Buyer's Guides
Subject:
Sound recordings
Subject:
Music
Subject:
Music -- 20th century -- History and criticism.
Subject:
Classical
Subject:
Music - Classical
Subject:
Music-Music Appreciation
Subject:
Music : Recording & Reproduction
Subject:
MUSIC / Reference
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20070410
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
324

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Discography and Buyer's Guides
Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Classical
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Recording Techniques

The Life and Death of Classical Music: Featuring the 100 Best and 20 Worst Recordings Ever Made
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Product details 324 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780307487469 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Looks at the rise and fall of the classical music recording industry, from the first notes of Enrico Caruso; to the heyday of Bernstein, Could, Callas, and Karajan; to the industry's collapse in the wake of corporate control and the growth of "crossover," citing the finest one hundred and the worst twenty classical recordings ever made. Original. 30,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , In this compulsively readable, fascinating, and provocativeguide to classical music, Norman Lebrecht, one of the world's most widely read cultural commentators tells the story of the rise of the classical recording industry from Caruso's first notes to the heyday of Bernstein,Glenn Gould, Callas,and von Karajan.

Lebrecht compellingly demonstrates that classical recording has reached its end point but this is not simply an expos? of decline and fall. It is, for the first time, the full story of a minor art form, analyzing thecultural revolution wrought by Schnabel, Toscanini, Callas, Rattle, the Three Tenors, and Charlotte Church. It is the story of how stars were made and broken by the record business; how a war criminal conspired witha concentration-camp victim to create a record empire; and how advancing technology, boardroom wars, public credulity and unscrupulous exploitation shaped the musical backdrop to our modern lives. The book ends with a suitable shrine to classical recording: the

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