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Going down South: A Novel

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Going down South: A Novel Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Part One

Olivia Jean

Her father, Turk, went down first, holding his work boots by the strings with his overnight kit tucked under one arm. He walked on his toes, taking the seventh step down with a side maneuver because he knew it creaked. He had learned his lesson the hard way from her mother, Daisy, waiting at the top of the stairs one night about five years ago. His foot strayed and pressed ahead when he should have gone to the left or the right. He might have made it past her if it hadn't been for that step. She had dozed off, and there were ways to get around Daisy when she was asleep. But he was in no state to remember all of the things he should have remembered. And besides, Daisy was sitting with her legs flung across the top of the landing just so she could catch him. Clutched in her right hand was a broom leaning forward at a cockeyed slant, straw bottom down and ready to do damage.

That night in March, Olivia Jean had just passed her tenth birthday and should have been asleep when he touched lucky stair number seven and it whined loud enough to wake her mother. Daisy grunted, choking on a snore, and was on her feet lightning quick without even rubbing her eyes or wiping the thin line of drool at the corner of her mouth. She gripped the broom in both hands, turned it upside down, and swung it at Turk's copper-skinned head. He leaned away in time but she started at him again. Her robe fell open, and Olivia Jean saw long, thick legs under a nightgown that stopped near her coochie, and then one of her titties fell out as she lifted her arm and aimed again. Olivia Jean was crouched at the keyhole of her bedroom door, jaw wide, the scene surprising her so much that she banged her head against the doorknob as she tried to get a better view.

Daisy kept swinging as if she were trying to get at a spider in the corner or a big, fat cockroach that always appeared out of nowhere when company came to visit. There was rage in her swinging, rage reserved for bugs, bad impressions, and drunken husbands. Then her other titty bounced free, and Turk fell back, clutching the railing. It seemed as though he was as surprised as Olivia Jean was. In all her days Olivia Jean had never seen Daisy's girl parts, and seeing them then, when her mother was in the middle of trying to kill her daddy, was enough to freeze Olivia Jean right where she was--on her knees, peeking into the dim hallway when she should have been curled up asleep with her Raggedy Ann tucked under her arm.

That was when Olivia Jean took a deep breath, stood up, opened the door, and ran out of her bedroom. Turk wasn't grabbing the broom or telling Daisy to stop or trying to move away or anything. He had leaned back, dropped his arms, and let Daisy continue to hit him with the broom across his shoulders, moving him backward as if she were going to push him down the stairs. Olivia Jean knew someone was going to call the police if they didn't stop. At four in the morning people should be in bed, going to bed, or at least thinking about going to bed, not on a rampage like Daisy was, beating Turk with the straw end of a broom while she danced around the hallway half-naked.

So when Daisy raised her broomstick higher, above her shoulders, aiming for the top of his head, Olivia Jean jumped in front of her father. No one moved. The only sound had been the swish of the broom as it waved through the a

Synopsis:

From the author of "The Middle Sister" comes the heartwarming story of three generations of spirited, proud women learning to live and love together in 1960s New York City and Alabama.

Synopsis:

Discovering that fifteen-year-old Olivia is pregnant, Daisy and her unfaithful husband decide to send her to her grandmother Birdie's Alabama farm for the duration of the pregnancy, but Birdie refuses to allow Olivia to stay unless her estranged daughter, Daisy, remains, in a story of three generations of women struggling to make sense of their roles as mothers.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345507389
Subtitle:
A Novel
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Author:
Glover, Bonnie
Author:
Bonnie J. Glover
Author:
Bonnie Glover
Subject:
Fiction : General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Intergenerational relations
Subject:
Mothers and daughters
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20080729
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
259

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Family Life

Going down South: A Novel
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Product details 259 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780345507389 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , From the author of "The Middle Sister" comes the heartwarming story of three generations of spirited, proud women learning to live and love together in 1960s New York City and Alabama.
"Synopsis" by , Discovering that fifteen-year-old Olivia is pregnant, Daisy and her unfaithful husband decide to send her to her grandmother Birdie's Alabama farm for the duration of the pregnancy, but Birdie refuses to allow Olivia to stay unless her estranged daughter, Daisy, remains, in a story of three generations of women struggling to make sense of their roles as mothers.
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