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    Nick Harkaway 9780385352413

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Brian's Winter

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Brian's Winter Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For two weeks the weather grew warmer and each day was more glorious than the one before. Hunting seemed to get better as well. Brian took foolbirds or rabbits every day and on one single day he took three foolbirds.

He ate everything and felt fat and lazy and one afternoon he actually lay in the sun. It was perhaps wrong to say he was happy. He spent too much time in loneliness for true happiness. But he found himself smiling as he worked around the camp and actually looked forward to bringing in wood in the soft afternoons just because it kept him out rummaging around in the woods.

He had made many friends--or at least acquaintances. Birds had taken on a special significance for him. At night the owls made their soft sounds, calling each other in almost ghostly hooonnes that scared him until he finally saw one call on a night when the moon was full and so bright it was almost like a cloudy day. He slept with their calls and before long would awaken if they didn't call.

Before dawn, just as gray light began to filter through the trees, the day birds began to sing. They started slowly but before the gray had become light enough to see ten yards all the birds started to sing and Brian was brought out of sleep by what seemed to be thousands of singing birds.

At first it all seemed to be noise but as he learned and listened, he found them all to be different. Robins had an evening song and one they sang right before a rainstorm and another when the rain was done. Blue jays spent all their time complaining and swearing but they also warned him when something--anything--was moving in the woods. Ravens and crows were the same--scrawking and cawing their way through the trees.

It was all, Brian found, about territory. Everybody wanted to own a place to live, a place to hunt. Birds didn't sing for fun, they sang to warn other birds to keep away--sang to tell them to stay out of their territory.

He had learned about property from the wolves. Several times he had seen a solitary wolf--a large male that came near the camp and studied the boy. The wolf did not seem to be afraid and did nothing to frighten Brian, and Brian even thought of him as a kind of friend.

The wolf seemed to come on a regular schedule, hunting, and Brian guessed that he ran a kind of circuit. At night while gazing at the fire Brian figured that if the wolf made five miles an hour and hunted ten hours a day, he must be traveling close to a hundred-mile loop.

After a month or so the wolf brought a friend, a smaller, younger male, and the second time they both came they stopped near Brian's camp and while Brian watched they peed on a rotten stump, both going twice on the same spot.

Brian had read about wolves and seen films about them: and knew that they "left sign," using urine to mark their territory. He had also read--he thought in a book by Farley Mowat--that the wolves respected others' territories as well as their own. As soon as they were well away from the old stump Brian went up and peed where they had left sign.

Five days later when they came through again Brian saw them stop, smell where he had gone and then spot the ground next to Brian's spot, accepting his boundary.

Good, he thought. I own something now. I belong. And he had gone on with his life believing that the wolves and he had settled everything.

But wolf rules and Brian rules only appl

Synopsis:

Instead of being rescued from a plane crash, as in the

Synopsis:

In Hatchet, 13-year-old Brian learned to survive alone in the Canadian wilderness, armed with only a hatchet. He was rescued at the end of the summer. Brian's Winter begins where Hatchet might have ended--Brian is not rescued, but must rely on his survival skills to face his deadliest enemy--a northern winter.

Synopsis:

In Hatchet, 13-year-old Brian Robeson learned to survive alone in the Canadian wilderness, armed only with his hatchet. Finally, as millions of readers know, he was rescued at the end of the summer. But what if Brian hadn't been rescued? What if he had been left to face his deadliest enemy--winter?

Gary Paulsen raises the stakes for survival in this riveting and inspiring story as one boy confronts the ultimate test and the ultimate adventure.

From the Paperback edition.

About the Author

GARY PAULSEN is the distinguished author of many critically acclaimed books for young people. His most recent books are Flat Broke; Liar, Liar; Masters of Disaster; Lawn Boy Returns; Woods Runner; Notes from the Dog; Mudshark; Lawn Boy; Molly McGinty Has a Really Good Day; The Time Hackers; and The Amazing Life of Birds (The Twenty Day Puberty Journal of Duane Homer Leech).

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385729963
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Subject:
Fiction
Author:
Paulsen, Gary
Author:
Gary Paulsen
Subject:
Action & Adventure
Subject:
Survival
Subject:
Action & Adventure
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction-Action & Adventure
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction-Action & Adventure - General
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction : Action & Adventure - General
Subject:
Winter
Subject:
Survival (after airplane accidents, shipwreck
Subject:
Nature & the Natural World
Subject:
Winter -- Fiction.
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - General
Subject:
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks
Subject:
Action & Adventure - General
Subject:
Survival -- Fiction.
Subject:
Audio Books-Children s
Subject:
Children s-Adventure Stories
Subject:
Children s Middle Readers-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Short Stories
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Foreign Languages-Korean
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
19980112
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
144

Related Subjects

Children's » Action and Adventure » Adventure Stories
Children's » Concepts » Seasons
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Young Adult » Fiction » Short Stories

Brian's Winter
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Product details 144 pages Random House Children's Books - English 9780385729963 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Instead of being rescued from a plane crash, as in the
"Synopsis" by , In Hatchet, 13-year-old Brian learned to survive alone in the Canadian wilderness, armed with only a hatchet. He was rescued at the end of the summer. Brian's Winter begins where Hatchet might have ended--Brian is not rescued, but must rely on his survival skills to face his deadliest enemy--a northern winter.
"Synopsis" by , In Hatchet, 13-year-old Brian Robeson learned to survive alone in the Canadian wilderness, armed only with his hatchet. Finally, as millions of readers know, he was rescued at the end of the summer. But what if Brian hadn't been rescued? What if he had been left to face his deadliest enemy--winter?

Gary Paulsen raises the stakes for survival in this riveting and inspiring story as one boy confronts the ultimate test and the ultimate adventure.

From the Paperback edition.

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