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The Sociopath next Door

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The Sociopath next Door Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Who is the devil you know?

Is it your lying, cheating ex-husband?

Your sadistic high school gym teacher?

Your boss who loves to humiliate people in meetings?

The colleague who stole your idea and passed it off as her own?

In the pages of The Sociopath Next Door, you will realize that your ex was not just misunderstood. He’s a sociopath. And your boss, teacher, and colleague? They may be sociopaths too.

We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in The Sociopath Next Door, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people—one in twenty-five—has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in twenty-five everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath. They could be your colleague, your neighbor, even family. And they can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.

How do we recognize the remorseless? One of their chief characteristics is a kind of glow or charisma that makes sociopaths more charming or interesting than the other people around them. They’re more spontaneous, more intense, more complex, or even sexier than everyone else, making them tricky to identify and leaving us easily seduced. Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others’ suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.

The fact is, we all almost certainly know at least one or more sociopaths already. Part of the urgency in reading The Sociopath Next Door is the moment when we suddenly recognize that someone we know—someone we worked for, or were involved with, or voted for—is a sociopath. But what do we do with that knowledge? To arm us against the sociopath, Dr. Stout teaches us to question authority, suspect flattery, and beware the pity play. Above all, she writes, when a sociopath is beckoning, do not join the game.

It is the ruthless versus the rest of us, and The Sociopath Next Door will show you how to recognize and defeat the devil you know.

Synopsis:

A practicing psychotherapist takes a hard look at the sociopaths--individuals with an antisocial personality disorder who possess no conscience or sense of guilt or shame--that we encounter in everyday life, describing the characteristics of such individuals, how to recognize them for what they are, and how to protect oneself from sociopaths. 40,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

<P>Who is the devil you know?</P><P>Is it your lying, cheating ex-husband?</P><P>Your sadistic high school gym teacher?</P><P>Your boss who loves to humiliate people in meetings?</P><P>The colleague who stole your idea and passed it off as her own?</P><P>In the pages of <i>The Sociopath Next Door</i>, you will realize that your ex was not just misunderstood. He&rsquo;s a sociopath. And your boss, teacher, and colleague? They may be sociopaths too.</P><P>We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in <i>The Sociopath Next Door</i>, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people&mdash;one in twenty-five&mdash;has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in twenty-five everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath. They could be your colleague, your neighbor, even family. And they can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.</P><P>How do we recognize the remorseless? One of their chief characteristics is a kind of glow or charisma that makes sociopaths more charming or interesting than the other people around them. They&rsquo;re more spontaneous, more intense, more complex, or even sexier than everyone else, making them tricky to identify and leaving us easily seduced. Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others&rsquo; suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.</P><P>The fact is, we all almost certainly know at least one or more sociopaths already. Part of the urgency in reading <i>The Sociopath Next Door</i> is the moment when we suddenly recognize that someone w

About the Author

MARTHA STOUT, Ph.D., was trained at the famous McLean Psychiatric Hospital and is a practicing psychologist and a clinical instructor in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. She is the author of The Myth of Sanity: Divided Consciousness and the Promise of Awareness and has been featured on FOX News, National Public Radio, KABC, and many other broadcasts. She lives on Cape Ann, in Massachusetts.

Table of Contents

Introduction: imagine — The seventh sense — Ice people: the sociopaths — When normal conscience sleeps — The nicest person in the world — Why conscience is partially blind — How to recognize the remorseless — The etiology of guiltlessness: what causes sociopathy? — The sociopath next door — The origins of conscience — Bernie's choice: why conscience is bettter — Groundhog day — Conscience in its purest form: Science votes for morality.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

butterfly, January 5, 2009 (view all comments by butterfly)
After reading the sociopath next door, I am convinced that my daughter is a sociopath. She meets all 7 characteristics of antisocial personality disorder. She walked out on her family . Her father, her sister, nor I have seen or talked to her in 10 years. I felt guilty because I could not understand what would make someone just divorce their family. I also felt guilty because I wasn't as sad as I thought I should be with her leaving, but she was driving me crazy.

LISTED are some examples of her behavior.
1. We were so close when she was a young child that I was shocked when she started school, and the school saw a different person than I did. One time she got NEEDS TO IMPROVE on all the social grades ( respects others property, respects authority, etc) on her report card. Her father let her know in no uncertain terms that best not happen again, and it didn't. At the end of the school year though her teacher told me that she did not actually improve but convinced the teacher that her Dad told her that she would never walk again if she brought home another report card like that, and the teacher was afraid it might be true.
2. She manipulated me for years. I finally learned when she spent 6 weeks in a drug rehab when she was 17, and the counselors finally figured her out. They taught me to recognize her manipultation. That was when the problems between us escalated, and things were never really same after.

3.She was so reckless all her life. She acted like Evil Knivel on her bicycle and even wrecked her Big Wheel by trying to drive on the sidewalk and curb at the same time. When she was a teenager, she told me that she was scared to drive fast. Later I got a summons for her to appear in court as a habitual bad driver and even speeding in a school zone.

These are just a few examples of her odd behavior. This book is easy to understand and helps us who have been exposed to socipaths to quit blaming ourselves. I thank you.
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marybet_joseph, July 8, 2008 (view all comments by marybet_joseph)
This is by far the best most laymen friendly book on Sociopathic disorder I have ever read. I have just recently been "gas lighted" at work. There is a young man age 20 who has been working there for 2 years and going to each employee and floor manager complaining that he wanted to kill himself. He was found in the bathroom with a plastic bag over his head.
The store floor managers were laughing when they told me that this kid brags about being standup comedian in Austin and that he also had a singing gig. The floor manager told me that all of the floor managers laugh at him and they all know about his threats to commit suicide.
When I came he latched onto me complaining that he had just returned from Dallas Tex where he went looking for his girlfriend who forgot to tell him which store she was now working for. (her boyfriend whisked her out of the store where she was being stalked by this suicidal, depressed "lover".) He wrecked his car because he could not find the girl and came back to work complaining of physical and mental and emotional injury because of this girl. This was Sept 2007 by February 9, 2008 he had attached himself to me, planting himself in my work space at the entrance of the store (I am a people greeter) He would lower his head and look darkly depressed, complain about his dad who told him, " either go to school or pay me rent."
His face is so gloomy and dark and depressed that it makes me sick to look at him. He is the first person customers see when they come in if he is sitting in an electric cart just inside the entrance. His black sullen looks and evil eyes are so evil. I had always tried to be polite to him and everyone- but he misinterpreted my kindness to mean that I was now repsponsible for his mental outlook on life.
1 day he came in and threw his keys down hard in front of me while i was with a customer he yelled, "I am depressed". Then he ran off and 2 min later came back jumped into the air and yelled "I have been depressed for 4 years but you (pointing to me) have been nice to me and I am not depressed anymore." I got "red lights" warning me about him. I did not know why. Then he began to come up behind me everyday at work whispering into my ear "Want a push up?" I was helping a customer. He was demanding attention from me knowing I had to attend to a customer. Ignoring him, he went across the room and stared at me until I was finished with the customer. I told him customers were more important and he said, "when did that start?" Every day he became more and more demanding of attentioln from me and especially when i was talking with some customer. I got to the point that my hands shook if he came near me. I dropped water on the floor. I could no longer cope working with him in my face everyday. I wrote management who ignored me. I wrote again, I was told that they could not force him to get professional help. I requested that mgt keep him out of my work space. They would not. In fact they brought him to my work space instructing him to empty the trash. He lies, he constantly bends the ear of mgt about his "poor me" situation and tells people that I hate him. He is 20 years old I am 70 years old, I have worked all my life and now I have to be tormented daily by this evil sociopath because the store managers are protecting him -he is allowed to come as close to me as he wants to within a foot of my space, he stares at me. He is just waiting for me to say something so he can scream out that he is abused. ALl of the floor managers are protecting him and lead him by the hand daily instructing him about his job duties. No one likes working with him because he is a master of getting out of work and dumping his work on other people. Mgt says he has the mind of a 12 year old and he is harmless. ONE night floor mgr told me that it was my responsibility to tell this sociopath to put four rows of grocery carts in the bay each night. I asked him if he was aware that I had complained to mgt about this lzy kid- he said no. He just repeated to me that it was my responsibility to make sure the kid did his job. The kid makes more money than I do. He has worked there for 2 years he should know by now what his duties are. He has been found sleeping in his car while on the clock. 5 other good cartpushers have left because they ended up doing all of this kid's work. He was given an electric cart pusher so he could push 20 cars at a time, but he pushed only 1 cart at a time and watches the other cartpushers manually push 10 carts at a time into the Bay. Then he complains that he needs help to get his work done. he is lazy, and manipulative and the store adores him and babysits him the managers go looking for him and quietly and very gently explain to him that he must do his job. This goes on everyday
I am losing my poise and will not be able to continue working at this company -in fact the floor managers are now harassing me in small ways. I am supposed to get breaks every 2 hrs I am the last person to get a break after 3 and 1/2 hours. This sociopath takes 90 min lunches in lieu of 1 hr and takes 30 breaks every 2 hours. This is a leading retail store in America that allows elder abuse by this sociopath.
God bless Martha Stout -her books should be read by all store Managers in the Nation.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780767920209
Subtitle:
The Ruthless versus the Rest of Us
Publisher:
Broadway Books
Author:
Stout, Martha
Author:
Martha Stout, Ph.D.
Author:
STOUT, MARTHA PHD
Author:
Martha Stout
Subject:
Personality
Subject:
Psychology & Psychiatry-Personality
Subject:
Psychology & Psychiatry-Mental Illness
Subject:
Psychology & Psychiatry-Psychopathology - General
Subject:
Psychology & Psychiatry-Psychopathology - Abnormal
Subject:
Psychology-Personality
Subject:
Psychology-Mental Illness
Subject:
Psychology-Psychopathology - General
Subject:
Psychology : Mental Illness
Subject:
Psychology : Psychopathology - General
Subject:
Psychology : Personality
Subject:
Psychology : Social Psychology
Subject:
Psychology : Interpersonal Relations
Subject:
Mental Illness
Subject:
General
Subject:
Psychopathology - Abnormal
Subject:
Psychopathology - General
Subject:
Antisocial personality disorders
Subject:
Psychopaths
Subject:
Personalityy
Subject:
Audio Books-Psychology
Subject:
Psychology : General
Subject:
Psychology-General Disorders
Subject:
Psychology: Personality Disorders
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20050208
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
241

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Personality Disorders
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders

The Sociopath next Door
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 241 pages Crown Publishing Group - English 9780767920209 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A practicing psychotherapist takes a hard look at the sociopaths--individuals with an antisocial personality disorder who possess no conscience or sense of guilt or shame--that we encounter in everyday life, describing the characteristics of such individuals, how to recognize them for what they are, and how to protect oneself from sociopaths. 40,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , <P>Who is the devil you know?</P><P>Is it your lying, cheating ex-husband?</P><P>Your sadistic high school gym teacher?</P><P>Your boss who loves to humiliate people in meetings?</P><P>The colleague who stole your idea and passed it off as her own?</P><P>In the pages of <i>The Sociopath Next Door</i>, you will realize that your ex was not just misunderstood. He&rsquo;s a sociopath. And your boss, teacher, and colleague? They may be sociopaths too.</P><P>We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in <i>The Sociopath Next Door</i>, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people&mdash;one in twenty-five&mdash;has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in twenty-five everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath. They could be your colleague, your neighbor, even family. And they can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt.</P><P>How do we recognize the remorseless? One of their chief characteristics is a kind of glow or charisma that makes sociopaths more charming or interesting than the other people around them. They&rsquo;re more spontaneous, more intense, more complex, or even sexier than everyone else, making them tricky to identify and leaving us easily seduced. Fundamentally, sociopaths are different because they cannot love. Sociopaths learn early on to show sham emotion, but underneath they are indifferent to others&rsquo; suffering. They live to dominate and thrill to win.</P><P>The fact is, we all almost certainly know at least one or more sociopaths already. Part of the urgency in reading <i>The Sociopath Next Door</i> is the moment when we suddenly recognize that someone w
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