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Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood

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Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When the ship veered into the Cape of Good Hope, Mum caught the spicy, heady scent of Africa on the changing wind. She smelled the people: raw onions and salt, the smell of people who are not afraid to eat meat, and who smoke fish over open fires on the beach and who pound maize into meal and who work out-of-doors. She held me up to face the earthy air, so that the fingers of warmth pushed back my black curls of hair, and her pale green eyes went clear-glassy. “Smell that,” she whispered, “that’s home.” Vanessa was running up and down the deck, unaccountably wild for a child usually so placid. Intoxicated already. I took in a faceful of African air and fell instantly into a fever. In Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight , Alexandra Fuller remembers her African childhood with visceral authenticity. Though it is a diary of an unruly life in an often inhospitable place, it is suffused with Fuller’s endearing ability to find laughter, even when there is little to celebrate. Fuller’s debut is unsentimental and unflinching but always captivating. In wry and sometimes hilarious prose, she stares down disaster and looks back with rage and love at the life of an extraordinary family in an extraordinary time. From 1972 to 1990, Alexandra Fuller–known to friends and family as Bobo–grew up on several farms in southern and central Africa. Her father joined up on the side of the white government in the Rhodesian civil war, and was often away fighting against the powerful black guerilla factions. Her mother, in turn, flung herself at their African life and its rugged farm work with the same passion and maniacal energy she brought to everything else. Though she loved her children, she was no hand-holder and had little tolerance for neediness. She nurtured her daughters in other ways: She taught them, by example, to be resilient and self-sufficient, to have strong wills and strong opinions, and to embrace life wholeheartedly, despite and because of difficult circumstances. And she instilled in Bobo, particularly, a love of reading and of storytelling that proved to be her salvation. A worthy heir to Isak Dinesen and Beryl Markham, Alexandra Fuller writes poignantly about a girl becoming a woman and a writer against a backdrop of unrest, not just in her country but in her home. But Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight is more than a survivor’s story. It is the story of one woman’s unbreakable bond with a continent and the people who inhabit it, a portrait lovingly realized and deeply felt.

Synopsis:

Born in England and now living in Wyoming, Fuller was conceived and bred on African soil during the Rhodesian civil war (1971-1979), a world where children over five "learn[ed] how to load an FN rifle magazine, strip and clean all the guns in the house, and ultimately, shoot-to-kill." With a unique and subtle sensitivity to racial issues,...

Synopsis:

The author describes her childhood in Africa during the Rhodesian civil war of 1971 to 1979, relating her life on farms in southern Rhodesia, Milawi, and Zambia with an alcoholic mother and frequently absent father.

About the Author

Alexandra Fuller was born in England in 1969. In 1972 she moved with her family to a farm in Rhodesia. After that country’s civil war in 1981, the Fullers moved first to Malawi, then to Zambia. Fuller received a B.A. from Acadia University in Nova Scotia, Canada. In 1994, she moved to Wyoming, where she still lives. She has two children.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781588360496
Subtitle:
An African Childhood
Publisher:
Random House
Author:
Fuller, Alexandra
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Africa
Subject:
History
Subject:
Girls
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Childhood Memoir
Subject:
Africa - General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography-Childhood Memoir
Subject:
History-Africa - General
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography-Historical - General
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Childhood Memoir
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Historical - General
Subject:
History : Africa - General
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : General
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Zimbabwe
Subject:
Biography-Childhood Memoir
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Subject:
World History-Africa
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
Africa-Zimbabwe
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
2001
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
301

Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Historical
Biography » Women
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
History and Social Science » World History » Africa
History and Social Science » World History » General

Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood
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Product details 301 pages Random House - English 9781588360496 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Born in England and now living in Wyoming, Fuller was conceived and bred on African soil during the Rhodesian civil war (1971-1979), a world where children over five "learn[ed] how to load an FN rifle magazine, strip and clean all the guns in the house, and ultimately, shoot-to-kill." With a unique and subtle sensitivity to racial issues,...
"Synopsis" by , The author describes her childhood in Africa during the Rhodesian civil war of 1971 to 1979, relating her life on farms in southern Rhodesia, Milawi, and Zambia with an alcoholic mother and frequently absent father.
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