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The Republic of Pirates: Being the True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down

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The Republic of Pirates: Being the True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Like any good work of nonfiction, The Republic of Pirates is fascinating simply in the breadth of its research. I can't, of course, vouch for the book's historical accuracy, but Woodard has done an impressive job of sifting through conflicting, often apocryphal accounts and countless myths and legends to offer an engrossing depiction that is every bit as gritty, suspenseful, and electrifying as any fiction." Chris Bolton, Powells.com (read the entire Powells.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the early eighteenth century a number of the great pirate captains joined forces, including Blackbeard, Black Sam Bellamy, and Charles Vane. This infamous "Flying Gang" was more than simply a band of thieves: Many of its member were sailors, indentured servants, and runaway slaves who turned to piracy as a revolt against the conditions they suffered on ships and plantations. Together they established a crude but distinctive democracy in the Bahamas, carving out their own zone of freedom in which servants were free, blacks could be equal citizens, and leaders were chosen or deposed by a vote.

For a brief, glorious period the pirate republic was enormously successful. At its height it cut off trade routes, sacked slave ships, and severed Britain, France, and Spain from their New World empires. The Royal Navy went from being unable to catch the pirates to being afraid to encounter them at all. Imperial authorities and wealthy ship owners denounced the pirates as the enemies of mankind, but huge numbers of common people saw them as heroes. Finally one man volunteered to pacify the pirates' Bahamian lair and destroy anyone who resisted — Woodes Rogers, a famous privateer himself and scion of a powerful merchant family.

Drawing on extensive research in the archives of Britain and the Americas, Colin Woodard tells the dramatic untold story of the Pirate Republic that shook the very foundations of the British and Spanish Empires and fanned the democratic sentiments that would one day drive the American Revolution.

Review:

"Woodard (The Lobster Coast) tells a romantic story about Caribbean pirates of the 'Golden Age' (1715–1725)whom he sees not as criminals but as social revolutionariesand the colonial governors who successfully clamped down on them, in the early 18th-century Bahamas. One group of especially powerful pirates set up a colony in the Bahamas. Known as New Providence, the community attracted not only disaffected sailors but also runaway slaves and yeomen farmers who had trouble getting a toehold in the plantation economy of the American colonies. The British saw piracy as a threat to colonial commerce and government. Woodes Rogers, the governor of the Bahamas and himself a former privateer, determined to bring the pirates to heel. Woodard describes how Rogers, aided by Virginia's acting governor, Alexander Spotswood, finally defeated the notorious Blackbeard. Woodard's portrait of Rogers is a little flatthe man is virtually flawless ('courageous, selfless, and surprisingly patriotic'), and the prose is sometimes breathless ('they would know him by just one word...pirate'). Still, this is a fast-paced narrative that will be especially attractive to lovers of pirate lore and to vacationers who are Bahamas-bound. Maps." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"This breezy, fast-moving book is filled with exciting action and colorful characters. It will provide general readers and those with a special interest in the period much enjoyment." Booklist

Review:

"Woodard focuses on a trio of pirates....This strategy, which Woodard undertakes with the enthusiasm of a mad researcher...ultimately sinks his ship. This well-written book commits an offense that deserves a plank walk: rendering the piratical life boring. (Grade: B)" Entertainment Weekly

Book News Annotation:

Woodard, a journalist and author, recounts the lives of early eighteenth century Caribbean pirates known as the "Flying Gang." He draws from archival materials from Britain and the Americas to describe the Golden Age of Piracy and four of its most prominent figures: pirates Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, Edward "Blackbeard" Thatch, Charles Vane, and Woodes Rogers, who was sent to confront them. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

In this unique and fascinating book, Woodard brings to life the virtually unexplored chapter of the Republic of Pirates — a notorious and enormously powerful cooperative headed by Edward "Blackbeard" Teach and "Black Sam" Bellamy — and its ultimate defeat.

Synopsis:

The Republic of Pirates features the 18th-century pirates Edward and#147;Blackbeardand#8221; Teach and and#147;Black Samand#8221; Bellamy, both of whom rose from England's underclass to become wealthy, notorious, and enormously powerful. Along with their associates in the Bahamas-based "Flying Gang," Teach and Bellamy banded together to form a pirate cooperative, culminating in a form of government in which blacks were equal citizens, the rich were imprisoned, and a sailor could veto his captain by egalitarian means. For a brief, glorious period they were astoundingly successful, and so disruptive to shipping that the governors of Jamaica, Virginia, Bermuda, and the Carolinas all began clamoring for intervention. One man volunteered to take on the pirates--a man named Woodes Rogers, once a privateer himself and now the owner of a merchant fleet. Rogers vowed he would not rest until he had destroyed Teach and Bellamy. Here is the true story of the rise and fall of the Republic of Pirates.

Synopsis:

Welcome to the Pirate Republic—the early-eighteenth-century home to some of the great pirate captains, including Blackbeard, "Black Sam" Bellamy, and Charles Vane. Along with their fellow pirates—former sailors, indentured servants, and runaway slaves—this "Flying Gang" established a crude but distinctive democracy in the Bahamas, carving out their own zone of freedom in which servants were free, blacks could be equal citizens, and leaders were chosen or deposed by a vote.

For a brief, glorious period the Pirate Republic was enormously successful. It cut off trade routes, sacked slave ships, and severed Europe from its New World empires. Imperial authorities and wealthy shipowners denounced its residents as the enemies of mankind, but common people saw them as heroes. Colin Woodard tells the dramatic untold story of the Pirate Republic that shook the very foundations of the British and Spanish Empires and fanned the democratic sentiments that would one day drive the American Revolution.

Synopsis:

and#160;

The untold story of a heroic band of Caribbean pirates whose defiance of imperial rule inspired revolt in colonial outposts across the world

In the early eighteenth century, the Pirate Republic was home to some of the great pirate captains, including Blackbeard, andquot;Black Samandquot; Bellamy, and Charles Vane. Along with their fellow piratesandmdash;former sailors, indentured servants, and runaway slavesandmdash;this andquot;Flying Gangandquot; established a crude but distinctive democracy in the Bahamas, carving out their own zone of freedom in which servants were free, blacks could be equal citizens, and leaders were chosen or deposed by a vote. They cut off trade routes, sacked slave ships, and severed Europe from its New World empires, and for a brief, glorious period the Republic was a success.

About the Author

Colin Woodard writes for the Chronicle of Higher Education and is the author of The Lobster Coast and Ocean's End. He lives in Portland, Maine.

Table of Contents

Contents

prologue             The Golden Age of Piracy  1

chapter one         The Legend (1696)  10

chapter two         Going to Sea (1697–1702)  28

chapter three      War (1702–1712)  52

chapter four       Peace (1713–1715)  86

chapter five         Pirates Gather (January–June 1716)  115

chapter six           Brethren of the Coast (June 1716–March 1717)  144

chapter seven      Bellamy (March–May 1717)  169

chapter eight      Blackbeard (May–December 1717)  194

chapter nine        Begging Pardon (December 1717–July 1718)  226

chapter ten          Brinksmanship (July–September 1718)  262

chapter eleven   Hunted (September 1718–March 1720)  282

epilogue               Piracys End (1720–1732)  311

acknowledgments  329

endnotes  333

index  371

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Bellamy Cay, June 6, 2011 (view all comments by Bellamy Cay)
Having read myriad books on pirates and piracy of the Golden Age, Woodard's "The Republic of Pirates" is by far the most comprehensive and well-told pirateological book, not plucking out individual pirates from history to give us their bulleted stories as though they were some mythological giants that temporarily stepped down from a veritable Mt. Olympus in the Caribbean to made havoc (as has been done to death by so many others), but rather, weaving together the true stories of the pirates, as real and breathing people, with the world history that was unfolding around them, relating them to one another in a full picture of the Old World's explosive collision with the New World in the 17th and 18th centuries. I cannot recommend this book enough to anyone who desires to have a more complete understanding of piracy and the drive for freedom and liberty against monarchial and corporate tyranny that sparked the ideals that would one day culminate in the creation of the United States.

Jim Cunningham, Docent
Whydah Pirate Museum - exhibit of the world's only authenticated pirate shipwreck
Provincetown, Cape Cod
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780151013029
Subtitle:
Being the True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Author:
Woodard, Colin
Subject:
Adventurers & Explorers
Subject:
BIO023000
Subject:
History
Subject:
Pirates
Subject:
Caribbean & West Indies
Subject:
Maritime History
Subject:
Caribbean & West Indies - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
May 7, 2007
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 maps, 2 charts
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 9.99 lb

Related Subjects

Transportation » Nautical » Pirates

The Republic of Pirates: Being the True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 400 pages Harcourt - English 9780151013029 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Woodard (The Lobster Coast) tells a romantic story about Caribbean pirates of the 'Golden Age' (1715–1725)whom he sees not as criminals but as social revolutionariesand the colonial governors who successfully clamped down on them, in the early 18th-century Bahamas. One group of especially powerful pirates set up a colony in the Bahamas. Known as New Providence, the community attracted not only disaffected sailors but also runaway slaves and yeomen farmers who had trouble getting a toehold in the plantation economy of the American colonies. The British saw piracy as a threat to colonial commerce and government. Woodes Rogers, the governor of the Bahamas and himself a former privateer, determined to bring the pirates to heel. Woodard describes how Rogers, aided by Virginia's acting governor, Alexander Spotswood, finally defeated the notorious Blackbeard. Woodard's portrait of Rogers is a little flatthe man is virtually flawless ('courageous, selfless, and surprisingly patriotic'), and the prose is sometimes breathless ('they would know him by just one word...pirate'). Still, this is a fast-paced narrative that will be especially attractive to lovers of pirate lore and to vacationers who are Bahamas-bound. Maps." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Like any good work of nonfiction, The Republic of Pirates is fascinating simply in the breadth of its research. I can't, of course, vouch for the book's historical accuracy, but Woodard has done an impressive job of sifting through conflicting, often apocryphal accounts and countless myths and legends to offer an engrossing depiction that is every bit as gritty, suspenseful, and electrifying as any fiction." (read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review" by , "This breezy, fast-moving book is filled with exciting action and colorful characters. It will provide general readers and those with a special interest in the period much enjoyment."
"Review" by , "Woodard focuses on a trio of pirates....This strategy, which Woodard undertakes with the enthusiasm of a mad researcher...ultimately sinks his ship. This well-written book commits an offense that deserves a plank walk: rendering the piratical life boring. (Grade: B)"
"Synopsis" by , In this unique and fascinating book, Woodard brings to life the virtually unexplored chapter of the Republic of Pirates — a notorious and enormously powerful cooperative headed by Edward "Blackbeard" Teach and "Black Sam" Bellamy — and its ultimate defeat.
"Synopsis" by ,
The Republic of Pirates features the 18th-century pirates Edward and#147;Blackbeardand#8221; Teach and and#147;Black Samand#8221; Bellamy, both of whom rose from England's underclass to become wealthy, notorious, and enormously powerful. Along with their associates in the Bahamas-based "Flying Gang," Teach and Bellamy banded together to form a pirate cooperative, culminating in a form of government in which blacks were equal citizens, the rich were imprisoned, and a sailor could veto his captain by egalitarian means. For a brief, glorious period they were astoundingly successful, and so disruptive to shipping that the governors of Jamaica, Virginia, Bermuda, and the Carolinas all began clamoring for intervention. One man volunteered to take on the pirates--a man named Woodes Rogers, once a privateer himself and now the owner of a merchant fleet. Rogers vowed he would not rest until he had destroyed Teach and Bellamy. Here is the true story of the rise and fall of the Republic of Pirates.

"Synopsis" by ,
Welcome to the Pirate Republic—the early-eighteenth-century home to some of the great pirate captains, including Blackbeard, "Black Sam" Bellamy, and Charles Vane. Along with their fellow pirates—former sailors, indentured servants, and runaway slaves—this "Flying Gang" established a crude but distinctive democracy in the Bahamas, carving out their own zone of freedom in which servants were free, blacks could be equal citizens, and leaders were chosen or deposed by a vote.

For a brief, glorious period the Pirate Republic was enormously successful. It cut off trade routes, sacked slave ships, and severed Europe from its New World empires. Imperial authorities and wealthy shipowners denounced its residents as the enemies of mankind, but common people saw them as heroes. Colin Woodard tells the dramatic untold story of the Pirate Republic that shook the very foundations of the British and Spanish Empires and fanned the democratic sentiments that would one day drive the American Revolution.

"Synopsis" by ,
and#160;

The untold story of a heroic band of Caribbean pirates whose defiance of imperial rule inspired revolt in colonial outposts across the world

In the early eighteenth century, the Pirate Republic was home to some of the great pirate captains, including Blackbeard, andquot;Black Samandquot; Bellamy, and Charles Vane. Along with their fellow piratesandmdash;former sailors, indentured servants, and runaway slavesandmdash;this andquot;Flying Gangandquot; established a crude but distinctive democracy in the Bahamas, carving out their own zone of freedom in which servants were free, blacks could be equal citizens, and leaders were chosen or deposed by a vote. They cut off trade routes, sacked slave ships, and severed Europe from its New World empires, and for a brief, glorious period the Republic was a success.

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