The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$3.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside American Studies- Culture Wars

This title in other editions

They Knew They Were Right: The Rise of the Neocons

by

They Knew They Were Right: The Rise of the Neocons Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Despite its shapelessness and its lack of a real thesis, They Knew They Were Right does have something to contribute. Heilbrunn...knows where the ideas are buried, unlike most journalists who have tried tackling this subject....He has...talked at length to the people who really matter — not just the public faces of the Bush administration's foreign policy....He has a good feel for the mercurial neocon mood....Since Heilbrunn is something of an insider with his own neoconservative past, his book will help outsiders understand the intellectual background to the Washington madness of the past five years." Mark Lilla, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The neocons have become at once the most feared and reviled intellectual movement in American history. Critics on left and right describe them as a tight-knit cabal that ensnared the Bush administration in an unwinnable foreign war.

Who are the neoconservatives? How did an obscure band of policy intellectuals, left for dead in the 1990s, suddenly rise to influence the Bush administration and revolutionize American foreign policy?

Jacob Heilbrunn wittily and pungently depicts the government officials, pundits, and think-tank denizens who make up this controversial movement, bringing them to life against a background rich in historical detail and political insight. Setting the movement in the larger context of the decades-long battle between liberals and conservatives, first over communism, now over the war on terrorism, he shows that they have always been intellectual mavericks, with a fiery prophetic temperament (and a rhetoric to match) that sets them apart from both liberals and traditional conservatives.

Neoconservatism grew out of a split in the 1930s between Stalinists and followers of Trotsky. These obscure ideological battles between warring Marxist factions were transported to the larger canvas of the Cold War, as over time the neocons moved steadily to the right, abandoning the Democratic party after 1972 when it shunned intervention abroad, and completing their journey in 1980 when they embraced Ronald Reagan and the Republican party. There they supplied the ideological glue that held the Reagan coalition together, combining the agenda of “family values” with a crusading foreign policy.

Out of favor with the first President Bush, and reduced to gadflies in the Clinton years, they suddenly found themselves in George W. Bushs administration in a position of unprecendented influence. For the first time in their long history, they had their hands on the levers of power. Prompted by 9/11, they used that power to advance what they believed to be Americas strategic interest in spreading democracy throughout the Arab world.

Their critics charge that the neo-conservatives were doing the bidding of the Israeli government — a charge that the neoconservatives rightfully reject. But Heilbrunn shows that the story of the neocons is inseparable from the great historical drama of Jewish assimilation. Decisively shaped by the immigrant exerience and the trauma of the Holocaust, they rose from the margins of political life to become an insurgent counter-establishment that challenged the old WASP foreign policy elite.

Far from being chastened by the Iraq debacle, the neocons continue to guide foreign policy. They are advisors to each of the major GOP presidential candidates. Repeatedly declared dead in the past, like Old Testament prophets they thrive on adversity. This book shows where they came from — and why they remain a potent and permanent force in American politics.

Review:

"News of neoconservatism's demise has been greatly exaggerated, according to prolific journalist Heilbrunn, who profiles the largely (though by no means exclusively) Jewish makeup of the movement. Heilbrunn roots his interpretation of neoconservatism's Jewish character in the American immigrant experience, the persistent memory of the Holocaust and Western appeasement of Hitler, among other phenomena. Charting the movement's philosophy from its inception through the foreign policy vision crafted in the 1970s and the culture wars of the 1980s and '90s, Heilbrunn employs a quasi-biblical spin echoed in Old Testament-inspired chapter headings. With the exception of his grasp of neoconservatism's right-wing Christian contingent, Heilbrunn displays an innate understanding of the movement. He argues persuasively that though these self-styled prophets embrace an outsider stance, and though he believes they are happiest when viewed as the opposition, they will remain a formidable influence for the foreseeable future. Heilbrunn's analysis lacks rigor concerning foreign policy assumptions and ideological and economic motives, thus unintentionally leaving his subjects more historically isolated than they really are. His proximity to the conservative movement brings benefits and limitations to this historical analysis." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"There was always something a little strange about the neo-conservatives, beginning with the oxymoron of their name. The term 'neocon' entered the zeitgeist in the months leading up to the Iraq war, when it became clear that a clique of sorts existed, united around the reverse domino principle that democracies would sprout like jimson weeds in the Middle East once Saddam Hussein was toppled. Intriguingly,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

Heilbrunn presents a sympathetic yet honest portrait of the men who make up the inner circle of neoconservatism today, bringing them to life against a background rich in historical detail and political insight.

About the Author

JACOB HEILBRUNN is a frequent columnist for the Los Angeles Times and has written for a wide variety of publications, including The New Republic and The Weekly Standard. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385511810
Subtitle:
The Rise of the Neocons
Author:
Heilbrunn, Jacob
Publisher:
Doubleday
Subject:
History
Subject:
Conservatism
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Conservatism & Liberalism
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
United States - 21st Century
Subject:
United States Politics and government.
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20080115
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9.58x6.50x1.19 in. 1.33 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Conscience of a Conservative...
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  2. Rightward Bound: Making America... Used Trade Paper $13.00
  3. Grace for President
    Used Hardcover $7.95
  4. Web Publishing with PHP and FileMaker 9 New Trade Paper $40.50
  5. Emotionally Intelligent Leadership:... Used Trade Paper $17.50
  6. Dali, Surrealism and Cinema Used Trade Paper $9.00

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » American Studies » Culture Wars
History and Social Science » Politics » Conservatism
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Culture
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

They Knew They Were Right: The Rise of the Neocons Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.50 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Doubleday Books - English 9780385511810 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "News of neoconservatism's demise has been greatly exaggerated, according to prolific journalist Heilbrunn, who profiles the largely (though by no means exclusively) Jewish makeup of the movement. Heilbrunn roots his interpretation of neoconservatism's Jewish character in the American immigrant experience, the persistent memory of the Holocaust and Western appeasement of Hitler, among other phenomena. Charting the movement's philosophy from its inception through the foreign policy vision crafted in the 1970s and the culture wars of the 1980s and '90s, Heilbrunn employs a quasi-biblical spin echoed in Old Testament-inspired chapter headings. With the exception of his grasp of neoconservatism's right-wing Christian contingent, Heilbrunn displays an innate understanding of the movement. He argues persuasively that though these self-styled prophets embrace an outsider stance, and though he believes they are happiest when viewed as the opposition, they will remain a formidable influence for the foreseeable future. Heilbrunn's analysis lacks rigor concerning foreign policy assumptions and ideological and economic motives, thus unintentionally leaving his subjects more historically isolated than they really are. His proximity to the conservative movement brings benefits and limitations to this historical analysis." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Despite its shapelessness and its lack of a real thesis, They Knew They Were Right does have something to contribute. Heilbrunn...knows where the ideas are buried, unlike most journalists who have tried tackling this subject....He has...talked at length to the people who really matter — not just the public faces of the Bush administration's foreign policy....He has a good feel for the mercurial neocon mood....Since Heilbrunn is something of an insider with his own neoconservative past, his book will help outsiders understand the intellectual background to the Washington madness of the past five years." (read the entire New Republic review)
"Synopsis" by , Heilbrunn presents a sympathetic yet honest portrait of the men who make up the inner circle of neoconservatism today, bringing them to life against a background rich in historical detail and political insight.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.