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2 Remote Warehouse Music- Rock History

The Chitlin' Circuit: And the Road to Rock 'n' Roll

by

The Chitlin' Circuit: And the Road to Rock 'n' Roll Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"It's 1951, and a group of teenagers who call themselves the Kings of Rhythm are motoring up Highway 61 from the Mississippi Delta, their instruments tied to the top of the car. A 19-year-old named Ike Turner is driving, and he and the band are on their way to Memphis when they hit a bump that sends their equipment flying. Turner and the others hail from Clarksdale, where poor folks make instruments out of wire and broomsticks, so when they discover a fracture in their amplifier, they just patch it and shoulder on." David Kirby, The Christian Science Monitor (Read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A definitive account of the birth of rock 'n' roll in black America, this book establishes the Chitlin' Circuit as a major force in American musical history. Combining terrific firsthand reporting with deep historical research, Preston Lauterbach uncovers characters like Chicago Defender columnist Walter Barnes, who pioneered the circuit in the 1930s, and larger-than-life promoters such as Denver Ferguson, the Indianapolis gambling chieftain who consolidated it in the 1940s. Charging from Memphis to Houston and now-obscure points in between, The Chitlin' Circuit brings us into the sweaty back rooms where such stars as James Brown, B. B. King, and Little Richard got their start. With his unforgettable portraits of unsung heroes including King Kolax, Sax Kari, and Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown, Lauterbach writes of a world of clubs and con men that has managed to avoid much examination despite its wealth of brash characters, intriguing plotlines, and vulgar glory, and gives us an excavation of an underground musical America.

Review:

"Six years before a white Pennsylvanian named Bill Haley recorded 'Rock Around the Clock,' Roy Brown, a black singer and song writer from New Orleans, wrote 'Good Rockin' Tonight' as a radio jingle for a whorehouse. Haley and Elvis Presley, who recorded Brown's song, are enshrined in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, while Brown, who died in 1981, remains without the honor. Brown's story is just one stop on music journalist's Lauterbach's rollicking history of forgotten promoters and performers on the loosely organized chain of dance halls, juke joints, and night clubs catering to black audiences — it became known as the chitlin' circuit because chitterlings, the intestines of pigs, were a popular delicacy. Lauterbach's writing is as energetic as a Little Richard song (a performer who started on the chitlin' circuit and crossed over to national fame), although he falls victim to his own enthusiasm and loses momentum in an attempt to recount a litany of figures. Regardless, Lauterbach's first book is a rocking read and a deserving tribute to the people and places who were the foundations of rock and roll. (July)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The first history of the network of black juke joints that spawned rock 'n' roll through an unholy alliance between vice and entertainment.

Synopsis:

Chosen by The Wall Street Journal as one of the Top Ten Non-Fiction books of 2011
Chosen by The Boston Globe as one of Top Non-Fiction books of 2011
An NPR Best Music Book of 2011
An Onion AV Club Best Book of 2011

The first history of the network of black juke joints that spawned rock 'n' roll through an unholy alliance between vice and entertainment.

About the Author

Preston Lauterbach lives with his wife and children in Memphis, Tennessee. The Chitlin' Circuit is his first book. He is at work on a history of Beale Street, the birthplace of the blues.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393076523
Author:
Lauterbach, Preston
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
History & Criticism *
Subject:
Music -- History and criticism.
Subject:
Music-Rock History
Publication Date:
20110731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
34 black-and-white illustrations
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock » Reference and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General

The Chitlin' Circuit: And the Road to Rock 'n' Roll New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$26.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393076523 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Six years before a white Pennsylvanian named Bill Haley recorded 'Rock Around the Clock,' Roy Brown, a black singer and song writer from New Orleans, wrote 'Good Rockin' Tonight' as a radio jingle for a whorehouse. Haley and Elvis Presley, who recorded Brown's song, are enshrined in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, while Brown, who died in 1981, remains without the honor. Brown's story is just one stop on music journalist's Lauterbach's rollicking history of forgotten promoters and performers on the loosely organized chain of dance halls, juke joints, and night clubs catering to black audiences — it became known as the chitlin' circuit because chitterlings, the intestines of pigs, were a popular delicacy. Lauterbach's writing is as energetic as a Little Richard song (a performer who started on the chitlin' circuit and crossed over to national fame), although he falls victim to his own enthusiasm and loses momentum in an attempt to recount a litany of figures. Regardless, Lauterbach's first book is a rocking read and a deserving tribute to the people and places who were the foundations of rock and roll. (July)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review A Day" by , "It's 1951, and a group of teenagers who call themselves the Kings of Rhythm are motoring up Highway 61 from the Mississippi Delta, their instruments tied to the top of the car. A 19-year-old named Ike Turner is driving, and he and the band are on their way to Memphis when they hit a bump that sends their equipment flying. Turner and the others hail from Clarksdale, where poor folks make instruments out of wire and broomsticks, so when they discover a fracture in their amplifier, they just patch it and shoulder on." (Read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)
"Synopsis" by , The first history of the network of black juke joints that spawned rock 'n' roll through an unholy alliance between vice and entertainment.
"Synopsis" by , Chosen by The Wall Street Journal as one of the Top Ten Non-Fiction books of 2011
Chosen by The Boston Globe as one of Top Non-Fiction books of 2011
An NPR Best Music Book of 2011
An Onion AV Club Best Book of 2011

The first history of the network of black juke joints that spawned rock 'n' roll through an unholy alliance between vice and entertainment.
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