Warriors B2G1 Free
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Book News | May 11, 2015

    Chris Hedges: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Chris Hedges



    Describe your latest book. Wages of Rebellion looks at the nature of rebellion, those who do it, why they do it, and the price they pay for being a... Continue »
    1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Wages of Rebellion

      Chris Hedges 9781568589664

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Russia- General Russian History

More copies of this ISBN

Pushkin's Children: Writing on Russia and Russians

by

Pushkin's Children: Writing on Russia and Russians Cover

ISBN13: 9780618125005
ISBN10: 0618125000
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $9.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

These twenty pieces address the politics, culture, and literature of Russia with both flair and erudition. Passionate and opinionated, often funny, and using ample material from daily life to underline their ideas and observations, Tatyana Tolstayas essays range across a variety of subjects. They move in one unique voice from Soviet women, classical Russian cooking, and the bliss of snow to the effect of Pushkin and freedom on Russia writers; from the death of the czar and the Great Terror to the changes brought by Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and Putin in the last decade. Throughout this engaging volume, the Russian temperament comes into high relief. Whether addressing literature or reporting on politics, Tolstayas writing conveys a deep knowledge of her country and countrymen. Pushkins Children is a book for anyone interested in the Russian soul.

Review:

"Tolstaya's essays in this compact, historically significant volume offer a fascinating, highly intelligent analysis of Russian society and politics." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Tolstaya...has the advantage of having seen and experienced firsthand both the literary and the political changes that have swept the country, and this perspective gives her essays and reviews a sharp edge; she can convey a humorous or a satirical tone depending on her topic." Library Journal

Review:

"Tatyana Tolstaya is an angry woman. She is angry at Gorbachev, she is angry at Yeltsin, she is positively furious with Solzhenitsyn, and she is not too pleased with Putin. The things that have happened to her country over the past hundred years make her blood boil. There are the great calamities, particularly Stalinism and all that it wrought, against which she rails in her essays; but, as with all good writers, it is in the details that she is her most telling." John Banville, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

Review:

"In Pushkin's Children, Tolstaya excoriates her fellow countrymen for their 'blind, superstitious belief in the spoken, and especially in the written, word.' In the title essay, however, a compressed but brilliant account of the effects of the fall of communism on Russian literature and its readers, she observes that after 1989 'the word, which had seemed unique and rare, was published in editions of millions and lost its magical qualities. The reader, elated at first, was eventually overwhelmed and then disappointed.... Everything was lost, everything was desacralized in one fell swoop.'" John Banville, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

Table of Contents

CONTENTS Introduction by Alma Guillermoprieto vi Womens Lives 1 The Great Terror and the Little Terror 14 Misha Gorbachevs Small World 27 Yeltsin Routs Gorbachev 49 The Future According to Alexander Solzhenitsyn 61 Pushkins Children 80 The Death of the Tsar 98 Kitchen Conversations 112 In the Ruins of Communism 124 Yeltsin and Russia Lose 140 The Past According to Alexander Solzhenitsyn 155 On Joseph Brodsky 168 Russias Resurrection 175 Dreams of Russia, Dreams of France 187 History in Photographs 196 The Price of Eggs 206 Snow in St. Petersburg 216 Andrei Platonovs Unusual World 218 The Making of Mr. Putin 227 Lies I Lived 240

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Russian lit-mystery fan, July 22, 2011 (view all comments by Russian lit-mystery fan)
In the 1990's, as her country experienced national identity crises, threats of civil war and upheaval, Tatyana Tolstaya enjoyed a new-found level of freedom as she wrote a fascinating series of essays on life in Post-Soviet Russia. Alternately provocative and witty, she challenges Western assumptions about her native land. Her eye-opening reviews of books such as Remnick's "Lenin's Tomb" and Radzinsky's "The Last Tsar" provide real food for thought. And her take on Alexander Solzhenitsyn really should be read by anyone seriously interested in modern Russian attitudes - a category to which Solzhenitsyn most definitely does not belong, in her view! Other essays deal with Stalin's legacy, Gorbachev, Yeltsin and Putin, poetry, snow and daily life, all of which are no less interesting. Jamey Gambrell's translation captures the rhythm of her writing brilliantly. Illuminating, and a quick read, I highly recommend this volume!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780618125005
Translator:
Gambrell, Jamey
Introduction:
Guillermoprieto, Alma
Translator:
Gambrell, Jamey
Introduction by:
Guillermoprieto, Alma
Introduction:
Guillermoprieto, Alma
Author:
Tolstaya, Tatyana
Author:
Guillermoprieto, Alma
Author:
Gambrell, Jamey
Author:
Tolstaia, Tat'iana
Publisher:
Mariner Books
Location:
Boston
Subject:
General
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Russian & Former Soviet Union
Subject:
Continental european
Subject:
Tolstaia, Tat'iana
Subject:
Anthologies-Essays
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
133
Publication Date:
January 2003
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.57x5.47x.66 in. .73 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. This I cannot forget :the memoirs of... Used Hardcover $15.95
  2. I Should Be Extremely Happy in Your...
    Used Hardcover $9.95
  3. The Boilerplate Rhino: Nature in the... Used Trade Paper $5.50
  4. The Street of Crocodiles (Penguin...
    Used Trade Paper $8.00
  5. Stalin's War with Germany #01: The... New Mass Market $20.00
  6. Henry Evans Botanical Prints Used Trade Paper $4.50

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Essays
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Russia » General Russian History
History and Social Science » World History » Russia

Pushkin's Children: Writing on Russia and Russians Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Mariner Books - English 9780618125005 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Tolstaya's essays in this compact, historically significant volume offer a fascinating, highly intelligent analysis of Russian society and politics."
"Review" by , "Tolstaya...has the advantage of having seen and experienced firsthand both the literary and the political changes that have swept the country, and this perspective gives her essays and reviews a sharp edge; she can convey a humorous or a satirical tone depending on her topic."
"Review" by , "Tatyana Tolstaya is an angry woman. She is angry at Gorbachev, she is angry at Yeltsin, she is positively furious with Solzhenitsyn, and she is not too pleased with Putin. The things that have happened to her country over the past hundred years make her blood boil. There are the great calamities, particularly Stalinism and all that it wrought, against which she rails in her essays; but, as with all good writers, it is in the details that she is her most telling." (read the entire New Republic review)
"Review" by , "In Pushkin's Children, Tolstaya excoriates her fellow countrymen for their 'blind, superstitious belief in the spoken, and especially in the written, word.' In the title essay, however, a compressed but brilliant account of the effects of the fall of communism on Russian literature and its readers, she observes that after 1989 'the word, which had seemed unique and rare, was published in editions of millions and lost its magical qualities. The reader, elated at first, was eventually overwhelmed and then disappointed.... Everything was lost, everything was desacralized in one fell swoop.'" (read the entire New Republic review)
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.