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Voices from the Street

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Voices from the Street Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Considering some of Dick's most well-known science fiction, such as Ubik and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, domestic realism may seem like a sharp deviation for him. But Voices From the Street gnaws on the same bone as much of Dick's sci-fi catalog. Like his other characters, there is something disturbingly familiar about Stuart Hadley and his mid-life devolution." John Burgman, Esquire (read the entire Esquire review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Stuart Hadley is a young radio electronics salesman in early 1950s Oakland, California. He has what many would consider the ideal life; a nice house, a pretty wife, a decent job with prospects for advancement, but he still feels unfulfilled; something is missing from his life. Hadley is an angry young man — an artist, a dreamer, a screw-up. He tries to fill his void first with drinking, and sex, and then with religious fanaticism, but nothing seems to be working, and it is driving him crazy. He reacts to the love of his wife and the kindness of his employer with anxiety and fear.

One of the earliest books that Dick ever wrote, and the only novel that has never been published, Voices from the Street is the story of Hadley's descent into depression and madness, and out the other side.

Most known in his lifetime as a science fiction writer, Philip K. Dick is growing in reputation as an American writer whose powerful vision is an ironic reflection of the present. This novel completes the publication of his canon.

Review:

"This previously unpublished novel is remarkable for a number of reasons, probably the least of which is novelistic merit. Stuart Hadley is a young man born to privilege; he is handsome and educated; his pregnant wife is devoted to him; he has worked his way up from salesman to manager of a television and radio shop, but he wants more. The more he wants is not clear, even to him, and his existential crisis involves him with a shady, quasi-religious sect, the Society of the Watchmen of Jesus, led by a charismatic evangelist. Stuart's flirtation with the movement soon leads him away from his placid middle-class life into a sinister association with a mysterious femme fatale, Marsha Frazier. His decline is accelerated by psychotic depression that spirals into life-threatening self-destruction. Like much of Dick's fiction, the plot skims ambiguously along an abstract surface, only occasionally revealing concrete motivation or linear connection. But that's what endears Dick's novels to millions of readers nearly 25 years after his death, and that's what makes him a significant postwar American novelist. Shallow characterization and crude dialogue show a young novelist groping for style. Still, echoes of Dick's contemporaries such as Ralph Ellison, Richard Yates, Rod Serling, Raymond Chandler and early Kurt Vonnegut Jr. resonate, and a bonus exists in Dick's impeccable eye for detail. Apart from creating an ambience that complements the novel, he provides a veritable literary museum of the early 1950s, replete with the period's social and political attitudes and dozens of references to everyday items, commonplace practices that underscore and illuminate this significant transitional period in American culture. Literary critics will have a field day; Dick fans will be in rapture." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The novel follows Hadley's descent into depression, madness, and eventual return to sanity. Surprisingly well written for a formative effort, it is a welcome addition to its author's large and brilliant canon." Booklist

Review:

"It may be hard for some to accept that the same writer who recently snuck into the American canon as a visionary and paranoid pop surrealist also penned a half dozen or more proletarian-realist novels set in the California of the '50's and early '60's, the best of which occupy a region demarcated by Richard Yates on one side and Charles Willeford on another. But accept it." Jonathan Lethem, author of The Fortress of Solitude

Review:

"An overwritten and too-long period piece that serves as areminder of just how strange the '50s could be." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"A kind of pulp-fiction Kafka, a prophet." The New York Times

Review:

"[U]nremittingly bleak, a mood intensified by its chapterless format..." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"One of the most original practitioners writing any kind of fiction." The Sunday Times (London)

Review:

"Dick is entertaining us about reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation.... We have our own homegrown Barges." Ursula K. LeGuin

Review:

"If someone were to write a history of the future as it has been dreamed up by Hollywood over the years, the chapter on today's tomorrow would belong in large part to Philip K. Dick." The Washington Post

Review:

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling — and terrifying— possibilities... that other authors shy away from." Paul Williams, Rolling Stone

Review:

"Dick was... one of the genuine visionaries that North American fiction has produced in this century." L.A. Weekly

Review:

"When it comes to intellectually challenging and deeply philosophical grist for contemporary screenwriters, few literary minds have been as reliably fertile as that of the late science-fiction master Philip K. Dick. The longtime Berkeley resident's many novels and short stories overflow with the kind of suspense, intrigue and heroics that interest Hollywood." San Francisco Chronicle

Synopsis:

One of the earliest books that Dick ever wrote, and the only novel that has not previously been published, Voices from the Street is the story of Stuart Hadley's descent into depression and madness, and out the other side.

Synopsis:

Stuart Hadley is a young radio electronics salesman in early 1950s Oakland, California. He has what many would consider the ideal life; a nice house, a pretty wife, a decent job with prospects for advancement, but he still feels unfulfilled; something is missing from his life. Hadley is an angry young man--an artist, a dreamer, a screw-up. He tries to fill his void first with drinking, and sex, and then with religious fanaticism, but nothing seems to be working, and it is driving him crazy. He reacts to the love of his wife and the kindness of his employer with anxiety and fear.
One of the earliest books that Dick ever wrote, and the only novel that has never been published, Voices from the Street is the story of Hadley's descent into depression and madness, and out the other side.
Most known in his lifetime as a science fiction writer, Philip K. Dick is growing in reputation as an American writer whose powerful vision is an ironic reflection of the present. This novel completes the publication of his canon.

Synopsis:

Stuart Hadley is a radio electronics salesman in early 1950s Oakland, California. He has what many would consider the ideal life; a nice house, a pretty wife, a decent job with prospects for advancement, but he still feels unfulfilled. Something is missing from his life. Hadley is a restless young man--an artist, a dreamer, a screw-up. He reacts to the love of his wife and the kindness of his employer with anxiety and fear. He tries to fill his void first with drinking, and then with an affair, and finally with religious fanaticism, but nothing seems to be working, and it is driving him crazy.

 

Voices from the Street is the story of Hadley's descent into depression and madness, and his emergence out the other side.

About the Author

Philip K. Dick has had six movies based on his stories made, including the classic, Blade Runner. Prior to his death in 1982, Dick lived in California.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780765316929
Publisher:
Tor Books
Subject:
General
Author:
Dick, Philip K.
Subject:
Depression, mental
Subject:
Self-perception
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Copyright:
Publication Date:
January 23, 2007
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.77 x 6.6 x 0.845 in

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » A to Z

Voices from the Street
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 304 pages Tor Books - English 9780765316929 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This previously unpublished novel is remarkable for a number of reasons, probably the least of which is novelistic merit. Stuart Hadley is a young man born to privilege; he is handsome and educated; his pregnant wife is devoted to him; he has worked his way up from salesman to manager of a television and radio shop, but he wants more. The more he wants is not clear, even to him, and his existential crisis involves him with a shady, quasi-religious sect, the Society of the Watchmen of Jesus, led by a charismatic evangelist. Stuart's flirtation with the movement soon leads him away from his placid middle-class life into a sinister association with a mysterious femme fatale, Marsha Frazier. His decline is accelerated by psychotic depression that spirals into life-threatening self-destruction. Like much of Dick's fiction, the plot skims ambiguously along an abstract surface, only occasionally revealing concrete motivation or linear connection. But that's what endears Dick's novels to millions of readers nearly 25 years after his death, and that's what makes him a significant postwar American novelist. Shallow characterization and crude dialogue show a young novelist groping for style. Still, echoes of Dick's contemporaries such as Ralph Ellison, Richard Yates, Rod Serling, Raymond Chandler and early Kurt Vonnegut Jr. resonate, and a bonus exists in Dick's impeccable eye for detail. Apart from creating an ambience that complements the novel, he provides a veritable literary museum of the early 1950s, replete with the period's social and political attitudes and dozens of references to everyday items, commonplace practices that underscore and illuminate this significant transitional period in American culture. Literary critics will have a field day; Dick fans will be in rapture." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Considering some of Dick's most well-known science fiction, such as Ubik and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, domestic realism may seem like a sharp deviation for him. But Voices From the Street gnaws on the same bone as much of Dick's sci-fi catalog. Like his other characters, there is something disturbingly familiar about Stuart Hadley and his mid-life devolution." (read the entire Esquire review)
"Review" by , "The novel follows Hadley's descent into depression, madness, and eventual return to sanity. Surprisingly well written for a formative effort, it is a welcome addition to its author's large and brilliant canon."
"Review" by , "It may be hard for some to accept that the same writer who recently snuck into the American canon as a visionary and paranoid pop surrealist also penned a half dozen or more proletarian-realist novels set in the California of the '50's and early '60's, the best of which occupy a region demarcated by Richard Yates on one side and Charles Willeford on another. But accept it."
"Review" by , "An overwritten and too-long period piece that serves as areminder of just how strange the '50s could be."
"Review" by , "A kind of pulp-fiction Kafka, a prophet."
"Review" by , "[U]nremittingly bleak, a mood intensified by its chapterless format..."
"Review" by , "One of the most original practitioners writing any kind of fiction."
"Review" by , "Dick is entertaining us about reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation.... We have our own homegrown Barges."
"Review" by , "If someone were to write a history of the future as it has been dreamed up by Hollywood over the years, the chapter on today's tomorrow would belong in large part to Philip K. Dick."
"Review" by , "[Dick] sees all the sparkling — and terrifying— possibilities... that other authors shy away from."
"Review" by , "Dick was... one of the genuine visionaries that North American fiction has produced in this century."
"Review" by , "When it comes to intellectually challenging and deeply philosophical grist for contemporary screenwriters, few literary minds have been as reliably fertile as that of the late science-fiction master Philip K. Dick. The longtime Berkeley resident's many novels and short stories overflow with the kind of suspense, intrigue and heroics that interest Hollywood."
"Synopsis" by , One of the earliest books that Dick ever wrote, and the only novel that has not previously been published, Voices from the Street is the story of Stuart Hadley's descent into depression and madness, and out the other side.
"Synopsis" by ,
Stuart Hadley is a young radio electronics salesman in early 1950s Oakland, California. He has what many would consider the ideal life; a nice house, a pretty wife, a decent job with prospects for advancement, but he still feels unfulfilled; something is missing from his life. Hadley is an angry young man--an artist, a dreamer, a screw-up. He tries to fill his void first with drinking, and sex, and then with religious fanaticism, but nothing seems to be working, and it is driving him crazy. He reacts to the love of his wife and the kindness of his employer with anxiety and fear.
One of the earliest books that Dick ever wrote, and the only novel that has never been published, Voices from the Street is the story of Hadley's descent into depression and madness, and out the other side.
Most known in his lifetime as a science fiction writer, Philip K. Dick is growing in reputation as an American writer whose powerful vision is an ironic reflection of the present. This novel completes the publication of his canon.
"Synopsis" by ,
Stuart Hadley is a radio electronics salesman in early 1950s Oakland, California. He has what many would consider the ideal life; a nice house, a pretty wife, a decent job with prospects for advancement, but he still feels unfulfilled. Something is missing from his life. Hadley is a restless young man--an artist, a dreamer, a screw-up. He reacts to the love of his wife and the kindness of his employer with anxiety and fear. He tries to fill his void first with drinking, and then with an affair, and finally with religious fanaticism, but nothing seems to be working, and it is driving him crazy.

 

Voices from the Street is the story of Hadley's descent into depression and madness, and his emergence out the other side.

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