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The Town That Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food

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The Town That Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food Cover

ISBN13: 9781605296869
ISBN10: 1605296864
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Over the past few years, Hardwick, Vermont, a typical hardscrabble farming community of 3,000

residents, has jump-started its economy and redefined its self-image through a local, self-sustaining

food system unlike anything else in America. Even as the recent financial downturn threatens to cripple

small businesses and privately owned farms, a stunning number of food-based businesses have grown

in the region. The Town That Food Saved is rich with appealing, colorful characters, from the optimistic upstarts creating a new agricultural model to the long-established farmers wary of the rapid change in the region.

 
Hewitt, a journalist and Vermonter, delves deeply into the repercussions of this groundbreaking approach to growing food, both its astounding successes and potential limitations. The captivating story of an unassuming community and its extraordinary determination to build a vibrant local food system, The Town That Food Saved is grounded in ideas that will revolutionize the way we eat and, quite possibly, the way we live.

Review:

"Through the last decade the Northern Vermont town of Hardwick, population 3200, gradually evolved into a nationally respected source of 'local food' and began to reap benefits. Hewitt, an area resident and family farmer, previously wrote about the area as a potential example of localized agriculture and economics, especially for a population whose residents' median income was below state average. But curiosity and healthy skepticism, along with his own investment, spurred him to this deeper investigation into the local personalities (and characters) driving the movement, and to observe, participate and reflect upon such odiferous activities as pig slaughtering. The resulting blend of analysis and reflection highlights the possibilities and perils of what Hewitt argues will impact the agricultural and economic future for better or worse." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Over the past three years, Hardwick, Vermont, a typical farming community of 3,000 residents, has jump-started its economy and redefined its self-image through a local, self-sustaining food system unlike anything else in America. Hewitt tells its important story.

Synopsis:

Over the past 3 years, Hardwick, Vermont, a typical hardscrabble farming community of 3,000 residents, has jump-started its economy and redefined its self-image through a local, self-sustaining food system unlike anything else in America. Even as the recent financial downturn threatens to cripple small businesses and privately owned farms, a stunning number of food-based businesses have grown in the region—Vermont Soy, Jasper Hill Farm, Pete's Greens, Patchwork Farm & Bakery, Apple Cheek Farm, Claire's Restaurant and Bar, and Bonnieview Farm, to name only a few. The mostly young entrepreneurs have created a network of community support; they meet regularly to share advice, equipment, and business plans, and to loan each other capital. Hardwick is fast becoming a model for other communities to replicate its success. Author Ben Hewitt presents the captivating story of a small town coming back to life, The Town That Food Saved is narrative nonfiction at its best: full of colorful characters and grounded in an idea that will revolutionize the way we eat.

About the Author

BEN HEWITT was born in northwestern Vermont and raised in a two-room cabin; his father was a poet and his mother worked on a nearby dairy farm. He now lives with his wife and two sons on a diversified, 40-acre farm in Vermont, where they produce dairy, beef, pork, lamb, vegetables, and berries. His work has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers, including Best Life, Men's Journal, National Geographic Adventure, the New York Times Magazine, Outside, and Skiing.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Denise Morland, May 16, 2011 (view all comments by Denise Morland)
The Town that Food Saved tells of Hardwick, Vermont, a small town that falls on hard times with high unemployment and a low median income. As the traditional jobs dry up in Hardwick a group of young entrepreneurs come to town and imagine a revitalized economy based on local, specialty food businesses like Vermont Soy and Pete's Greens. The unusual and interesting part of this book is that Hewitt careful addresses the issues of how local is local (10miles? 100?) and when does a company get too big to be retain the personality and benefits of a small, independent operation? One of the big conflicts in Hardwick comes from the tension between the small farmers who have quietly been operating local, organic, sustainable farms for decades and the brash, vocal new entrepreneurs who envision a bigger, richer future for the small town. Hewitt talks a hard look at these two groups, compares the similarities and differences in their goals, and provides an interesting, unbiased analysis of the situation.

The Town That Food Saved succeeds best when Hewitt is focused on the quirky characters, unique businesses, and attention grabbing anecdotes that he delivers throughout the book. Too often he gets mired down in historic details or pedantic discussions about terminology or methods. Still, the book is worth reading for the in depth exploration of issues about what constitutes local and sustainable and why those are important ideas in our food sources.

I listened to The Town That Food Saved on audio, read by Arthur Morey. He has a lovely, deep, sonorous voice that, at first, made the dull parts of the book even harder to pay attention to. As the pace quickened in the story and more personalities were introduced, his resonant tones added a pleasant dimension to the story.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781605296869
Subtitle:
How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food
Author:
Hewitt, Ben
Publisher:
Rodale Books
Subject:
Modern - General
Subject:
Food supply - Social aspects - Vermont -
Subject:
Food industry and trade - Vermont - Hardwick
Subject:
Industries - General
Subject:
Agriculture & Food
Subject:
Industries - Agribusiness
Subject:
Agriculture - Sustainable Agriculture
Subject:
General-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20110607
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1-8 pp bandw insert
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.74 x 6.46 x 0.925 in

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Related Subjects

Business » General
Business » Small Businesses » General
Business » Start Up Business
Cooking and Food » Sustainable Cooking
History and Social Science » Sociology » Agriculture and Food
Home and Garden » Sustainable Living » Food
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » Sustainable Living

The Town That Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food Used Hardcover
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$8.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Rodale Press - English 9781605296869 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Through the last decade the Northern Vermont town of Hardwick, population 3200, gradually evolved into a nationally respected source of 'local food' and began to reap benefits. Hewitt, an area resident and family farmer, previously wrote about the area as a potential example of localized agriculture and economics, especially for a population whose residents' median income was below state average. But curiosity and healthy skepticism, along with his own investment, spurred him to this deeper investigation into the local personalities (and characters) driving the movement, and to observe, participate and reflect upon such odiferous activities as pig slaughtering. The resulting blend of analysis and reflection highlights the possibilities and perils of what Hewitt argues will impact the agricultural and economic future for better or worse." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Over the past three years, Hardwick, Vermont, a typical farming community of 3,000 residents, has jump-started its economy and redefined its self-image through a local, self-sustaining food system unlike anything else in America. Hewitt tells its important story.
"Synopsis" by ,
Over the past 3 years, Hardwick, Vermont, a typical hardscrabble farming community of 3,000 residents, has jump-started its economy and redefined its self-image through a local, self-sustaining food system unlike anything else in America. Even as the recent financial downturn threatens to cripple small businesses and privately owned farms, a stunning number of food-based businesses have grown in the region—Vermont Soy, Jasper Hill Farm, Pete's Greens, Patchwork Farm & Bakery, Apple Cheek Farm, Claire's Restaurant and Bar, and Bonnieview Farm, to name only a few. The mostly young entrepreneurs have created a network of community support; they meet regularly to share advice, equipment, and business plans, and to loan each other capital. Hardwick is fast becoming a model for other communities to replicate its success. Author Ben Hewitt presents the captivating story of a small town coming back to life, The Town That Food Saved is narrative nonfiction at its best: full of colorful characters and grounded in an idea that will revolutionize the way we eat.
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