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Cradle Book: Stories and Fables (American Reader #13)

by

Cradle Book: Stories and Fables (American Reader #13) Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"'Perhaps, someday, we will find answers among the rubble.' Fables in the truest sense, these exquisite stories offer a sense of wonder even as they lead us deeper and deeper into the darkness of the unconscious. 'We do all know, or at least we believe, that there are some things which must occur and which we cannot understand. Without them, the world would surely stop.'" Peter Grandbois, Rain Taxi (Read the entire Rain Taxi review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Timeless yet timely and hopeful with a dark underbelly, these fables revive a tradition running from Aesop to W.S. Merwin. With a poet's mastery, Craig Morgan Teicher creates strange worlds populated by animals fated for disaster and the people who interact with them, or simply act like them, including a very sad boy who wishes he had been raised by wolves. There are also a handful of badly behaving gods, a talking tree, and a shape-shifting room.

Review:

"Thirty-three sublime, deceptively simple reflections on states of human awareness comprise this prose collection by poet Teicher (Brenda Is in the Room), who is also PW's poetry editor. In bedtime-story selections grouped under themes of 'Silence,' 'Fear,' 'Sleep,' Teicher gives voice to our suppressed terrors of the dark, animism, unclean urges, and supernatural convergences: a man is granted the wish of invisibility in 'The Reward,' using the power to observe everything he can until he becomes 'a repository... of moments that threaten to repeat themselves for all eternity,' in short, a poet; dust collecting in clumps in corners takes on life as 'it is simply waiting for us to join it' ('The Dust'); a tree stump finds a remedy for its acute loneliness by engulfing a monk in its gnarled roots so that they can die together ('The Monk and the Stump'). The immutable condition of the stone becomes the metaphor for life in 'The Story of the Stone.' Teicher's subtly composed fables are effortless and enduring, celebrate the virtue of story above all, and render philosophers of his readers. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Haunting and beautiful fables of lonely birds, groaning cows, nurturing wolves, and sad little boys.

Synopsis:

Timeless yet timely and hopeful with a dark underbelly, these fables revive a tradition running from Aesop to W.S. Merwin. With a poets mastery, Craig Morgan Teicher creates strange worlds populated by animals fated for disaster and the people who interact with them, or simply act like them, including a very sad boy who wishes he had been raised by wolves. There are also a handful of badly behaving gods, a talking tree, and a shape-shifting room.

Craig Morgan Teicher is poetry editor of Publishers Weekly and a vice president on the board of the National Book Critics Circle. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

From The Brooklyn Rail:

“The great challenge of literature is always changing, is as mutable as our striving and forgetful cultures- but always, it is some part of the authors job description to strip away our truisms and describe the gaping unknown. Teicher, in Cradle Book, sits somewhere on the other side, and transmits.”

From Powells Books:

“Instead of the artifical clarity of the carefully orchestrated life evident in so much narrative realism, these pieces seek to explore what we dont understand, to open up questions that lead to more questions...Fables in the truest sense, these exquisite stories offer a sense of wonder even as they lead us deeper and deeper into the darkness of the unconscious.”

About the Author

Craig Morgan Teicher is poetry editor of Publishers Weekly, and a Vice President on the board of the National Book Critics Circle. His first book of poems, Brenda Is In The Room And Other Poems, was chosen by Paul Hoover and published as winner of the 2007 Colorado Prize for Poetry. He teaches at Pratt Institute and Columbia University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781934414354
Author:
Teicher, Craig Morgan
Publisher:
BOA Editions
Subject:
Fables
Subject:
General
Subject:
Short Stories (single author)
Subject:
Fairy Tales, Folklore & Mythology
Subject:
Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Subject:
Stories (single author)
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
First
Series:
American Readers Series
Series Volume:
13
Publication Date:
20100631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
72
Dimensions:
8 x 5.25 x 0.35 in 3.5 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
Humanities » Mythology » Folklore and Storytelling

Cradle Book: Stories and Fables (American Reader #13) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 72 pages BOA Editions - English 9781934414354 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Thirty-three sublime, deceptively simple reflections on states of human awareness comprise this prose collection by poet Teicher (Brenda Is in the Room), who is also PW's poetry editor. In bedtime-story selections grouped under themes of 'Silence,' 'Fear,' 'Sleep,' Teicher gives voice to our suppressed terrors of the dark, animism, unclean urges, and supernatural convergences: a man is granted the wish of invisibility in 'The Reward,' using the power to observe everything he can until he becomes 'a repository... of moments that threaten to repeat themselves for all eternity,' in short, a poet; dust collecting in clumps in corners takes on life as 'it is simply waiting for us to join it' ('The Dust'); a tree stump finds a remedy for its acute loneliness by engulfing a monk in its gnarled roots so that they can die together ('The Monk and the Stump'). The immutable condition of the stone becomes the metaphor for life in 'The Story of the Stone.' Teicher's subtly composed fables are effortless and enduring, celebrate the virtue of story above all, and render philosophers of his readers. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "'Perhaps, someday, we will find answers among the rubble.' Fables in the truest sense, these exquisite stories offer a sense of wonder even as they lead us deeper and deeper into the darkness of the unconscious. 'We do all know, or at least we believe, that there are some things which must occur and which we cannot understand. Without them, the world would surely stop.'" (Read the entire Rain Taxi review)
"Synopsis" by , Haunting and beautiful fables of lonely birds, groaning cows, nurturing wolves, and sad little boys.
"Synopsis" by ,

Timeless yet timely and hopeful with a dark underbelly, these fables revive a tradition running from Aesop to W.S. Merwin. With a poets mastery, Craig Morgan Teicher creates strange worlds populated by animals fated for disaster and the people who interact with them, or simply act like them, including a very sad boy who wishes he had been raised by wolves. There are also a handful of badly behaving gods, a talking tree, and a shape-shifting room.

Craig Morgan Teicher is poetry editor of Publishers Weekly and a vice president on the board of the National Book Critics Circle. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

From The Brooklyn Rail:

“The great challenge of literature is always changing, is as mutable as our striving and forgetful cultures- but always, it is some part of the authors job description to strip away our truisms and describe the gaping unknown. Teicher, in Cradle Book, sits somewhere on the other side, and transmits.”

From Powells Books:

“Instead of the artifical clarity of the carefully orchestrated life evident in so much narrative realism, these pieces seek to explore what we dont understand, to open up questions that lead to more questions...Fables in the truest sense, these exquisite stories offer a sense of wonder even as they lead us deeper and deeper into the darkness of the unconscious.”

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