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Light House

by

Light House Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Tim Picasso is a handsome young intellectual and frustrated painter. Turned down for an art fellowship (too heterosexual, not ethnic enough), his financial prospects dwindling, he finds himself accidentally involved in a drug deal. Resourcefully, he makes the drop but flees with the proceeds to the peaceful anonymity of the Admiral Benbow Inn. His fellow guests include an eccentric band of misfits: a bitter journalist from New York, with a personal vendetta against: a famous novelist who is there to give a fiction workshop, which is canceled — no one can make it through the storm, except (inexplicably): a Mafia don in pursuit of Tim and the missing cash, but distracted by both the innkeeper's philandering wife and: a cross-dressing contractor, who is restoring (and trapped in) the old lighthouse out at the point.

Thus the stage is set for a weekend frolic of Seinfeldian coincidences, a theatrical series of mistaken identities, detours of sexual experimentation, and whiskey-soaked debates. Tempers and hormones flare with the storm. As the gale whips up, and waves crash through the windows of the billiard room, the unlikely stable of guests are forced to hunker down together to wait out the tempest. Full of wit and irony, Monahan's biting prose and artful storytelling leaves its impression long after the lighthouse has blown away.

Review:

"The setting is pervasive and rendered with immediacy. The book is also very funny, and Monahan's cocksure prose gallops along." William Georgiades, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Hilarious New England farce drenched in salt spray, rum, bodily fluids, and gasoline." Talk Magazine

Review:

"[Light House] is a very clever, witty, and sardonic novel about art, literature, love, and identity. Puns and double entendres speed the reader through the book. Stylistically, Monahan is paying tribute to Vladimir Nabokov's lush prose style and Kurt Vonnegut's acerbic humor. At heart, this is a wry novel of ideas and intellectual humor. What holds it together and makes it a success is Monahan's literary acumen and cerebral skill." Booklist

Review:

"Monahan's riffs are like someone else's home movies; they're fascinating, totally unique, and giddily self-involved." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"A nor?easter howls, and a loopy cast prowls the rickety corridors of a ramshackle B&B as a first novelist tries his hand at farce — with mixed results....Let the howling and prowling commence as doors slam, booze flows, satire rules, and a variety of not-very-elusive postmodern targets get demolished. Proof once again how very hard it is to be funny." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"As the storm escalates, so do the action and the absurdities in the well-written tale." Library Journal

Review:

"[A] worthy successor to Kingsley Amis. His understated cleverness and irreverence hold sway as he alternates between sly hipness and laugh-out-loud slapstick." Book Page

Review:

"William Monahan kept me up late laughing and bothering my neighbors. I've been trying to think up something witty to say in his praise, but I just can't top his own outrageous mirth. I howled. He's that good." Bill Henderson, Editor, The Pushcart Prize

Review:

"If the young Elmore Leonard had novelized Fawlty Towers, it would be something like Light House. This book overflows with spunk." Kurt Andersen, author of Turn of the Century

Synopsis:

In this sharp, hilarious, farcical romp of a first novel, a coastal New England B&B is turned on its ear during a nor' easter by an outrageous cost of characters.

About the Author

William Monahan has written a Pushcart-Prize-winning short story, and the screenplay Light House, which has been optioned to Warner Bros. He lives in Northampton, Massachusetts, where he is at work on his second novel.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781573228770
Author:
Monahan, William
Publisher:
Riverhead Trade
Author:
Monahan, William
Subject:
General
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Artists
Subject:
General Fiction
Edition Description:
Mass Market
Publication Date:
20010801
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.02x5.16x.63 in. .43 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Light House Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Riverhead Books - English 9781573228770 Reviews:
"Review" by , "The setting is pervasive and rendered with immediacy. The book is also very funny, and Monahan's cocksure prose gallops along."
"Review" by , "Hilarious New England farce drenched in salt spray, rum, bodily fluids, and gasoline."
"Review" by , "[Light House] is a very clever, witty, and sardonic novel about art, literature, love, and identity. Puns and double entendres speed the reader through the book. Stylistically, Monahan is paying tribute to Vladimir Nabokov's lush prose style and Kurt Vonnegut's acerbic humor. At heart, this is a wry novel of ideas and intellectual humor. What holds it together and makes it a success is Monahan's literary acumen and cerebral skill."
"Review" by , "Monahan's riffs are like someone else's home movies; they're fascinating, totally unique, and giddily self-involved."
"Review" by , "A nor?easter howls, and a loopy cast prowls the rickety corridors of a ramshackle B&B as a first novelist tries his hand at farce — with mixed results....Let the howling and prowling commence as doors slam, booze flows, satire rules, and a variety of not-very-elusive postmodern targets get demolished. Proof once again how very hard it is to be funny."
"Review" by , "As the storm escalates, so do the action and the absurdities in the well-written tale."
"Review" by , "[A] worthy successor to Kingsley Amis. His understated cleverness and irreverence hold sway as he alternates between sly hipness and laugh-out-loud slapstick."
"Review" by , "William Monahan kept me up late laughing and bothering my neighbors. I've been trying to think up something witty to say in his praise, but I just can't top his own outrageous mirth. I howled. He's that good."
"Review" by , "If the young Elmore Leonard had novelized Fawlty Towers, it would be something like Light House. This book overflows with spunk."
"Synopsis" by , In this sharp, hilarious, farcical romp of a first novel, a coastal New England B&B is turned on its ear during a nor' easter by an outrageous cost of characters.
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