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The Road to Democracy in Iran (Boston Review Books)

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The Road to Democracy in Iran (Boston Review Books) Cover

ISBN13: 9780262072953
ISBN10: 0262072955
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: None
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Review-A-Day

"Ganji recently published a slim volume born of his time in prison. Immodestly called The Road to Democracy in Iran, it opens — chillingly — with the words 'Today, June 29, 2005, is the nineteenth day of my second hunger strike.' The book is not a collection of prison notes, however, but rather a sketch of a future Iranian state, one that would have the most basic human rights principles at its core." Negar Azimi, The Nation (read the entire Nation review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Akbar Ganji, called by some "Iran's most famous dissident," was a member of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. But, troubled by the regime's repressive nature, he became an investigative journalist in the 1990s, writing for Iran's pro-democracy newspapers. Most notably, he traced the murders of dissident intellectuals to Iran's secret service. In 2000 Ganji was arrested, sentenced to six years in prison, and banned from working as a journalist. His eighty-day hunger strike during his last year in prison mobilized the international human rights community. The Road to Democracy in Iran, Ganji's first book in English, demonstrates his lifelong commitment to human rights and democracy. A passionate call for universal human rights and the right to democracy from a Muslim perspective, it lays out the goals and means of Iran's democracy movement, why women's rights trump some interpretations of Islamic law, and how the West can help promote democracy in Iran (he strongly opposes U.S. intervention) and other Islamic countries. Throughout the book Ganji argues consistently for universal rights based on our common humanity (and he believes the world's religions support that idea). But his arguments never veer into abstraction; they are rooted deeply in the realities of life in Islamic countries, and offer a clear picture of the possibilities for and obstacles to improving human rights and promoting democracy in the Muslim world. Since his release from prison in March 2006, Akbar Ganji has been traveling outside Iran, meeting with intellectuals and activists in the international human rights community. He is currently living in the United States."Ganji goes beyond religion, ethnicity, or nationality in recognizing universality of concepts such as democracy and human rights. Thus he brings Iran back to the world, allying himself with democratic elements in his country no matter what their creed, and drawing freely upon the writings of democratic thinkers in the West."--Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran

Synopsis:

A famous Iranian dissident calls for universal human rights and democracy based on our common humanity.

Synopsis:

Akbar Ganji, called by some Iran's most famous dissident, was a commander of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. But, troubled by the regime's repressive nature, he became an investigative journalist in the 1990s, writing for Iran's pro-democracy newspapers. Most notably, he traced the murders of dissident intellectuals to Iran's secret service. In 2000 Ganji was arrested, sentenced to six years in prison, and banned from working as a journalist. His eighty-day hunger strike during his last year in prison mobilized the international human rights community.

About the Author

Akbar Ganji, called by some "Iran's most famous dissident," was a member of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. Since his release from prison in March 2006, he has been traveling outside Iran, meeting with intellectuals and activists in the international human rights community. He is currently living in the United States.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262072953
Author:
Ganji, Akbar
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Foreword by:
Cohen, Joshua
Foreword by:
Milani, Abbas
Foreword:
Milani, Abbas
Foreword:
Cohen, Joshua
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Milani, Abbas
Author:
Chasman, Deb
Author:
Cohen, Joshua
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Democracy
Subject:
Human Rights
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Human Rights
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Democracy
Subject:
Human rights -- Iran.
Subject:
Democracy -- Iran.
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Copyright:
Series:
Boston Review Books The Road to Democracy in Iran
Publication Date:
20080321
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Pages:
144
Dimensions:
7 x 4.5 x 0.4375 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Middle East » Iran and Persia
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy

The Road to Democracy in Iran (Boston Review Books) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.25 In Stock
Product details 144 pages Mit Press - English 9780262072953 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "Ganji recently published a slim volume born of his time in prison. Immodestly called The Road to Democracy in Iran, it opens — chillingly — with the words 'Today, June 29, 2005, is the nineteenth day of my second hunger strike.' The book is not a collection of prison notes, however, but rather a sketch of a future Iranian state, one that would have the most basic human rights principles at its core." (read the entire Nation review)
"Synopsis" by , A famous Iranian dissident calls for universal human rights and democracy based on our common humanity.
"Synopsis" by , Akbar Ganji, called by some Iran's most famous dissident, was a commander of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. But, troubled by the regime's repressive nature, he became an investigative journalist in the 1990s, writing for Iran's pro-democracy newspapers. Most notably, he traced the murders of dissident intellectuals to Iran's secret service. In 2000 Ganji was arrested, sentenced to six years in prison, and banned from working as a journalist. His eighty-day hunger strike during his last year in prison mobilized the international human rights community.
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