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This title in other editions

Here Kitty Kitty: A Novel

by

Here Kitty Kitty: A Novel Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"The Jazz Age had Fitzgerald, the Beat Generation had Kerouac, and now post-millennium Williamsburg has Jardine Libaire....Could Libaire's be the voice of her subculture? She certainly has the tone down. Here Kitty Kitty is irritating for the same reasons that hipsters are irritating: It is strutting, humorless, and formulaic." Anna Godbersen, Esquire (read the entire Esquire review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Lee is a redhead with an appetite for bad things, a cross between a hipster and a calendar girl. A beautiful mess, she trips down late-night sidewalks in Helmut Lang heels and a vintage Dior dress. Her plan is to be an artist, but these days, her feverishly bohemian life has her doing more drugs than art. She hates her apartment in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, its floors strewn with beer bottles, record albums, and ashtrays, but she hates it even more that she's about to be evicted.

Managing a Tribeca restaurant, Lee works hard to make rent, but then spends the money on pills, cocktails, and vintage handbags. And as her wild life becomes more escapism than freedom, she faces the terrifying prospect that she has gone too far to get back. She considers an older man's offer to pay off her debts, and for the first time imagines compromising her dreams.

Jardine Libaire's voice, like her heroine, is tough, seductive, and hard-hitting. Told in a series of snapshots, Here Kitty Kitty is a portrait of New York in all its darkness and glamour. It's a tour through Wall Street steak houses, cocaine dens, Hamptons beaches, loft parties, art galleries, strip clubs, hospital rooms, and Brooklyn rooftops. It's a tale of debt, art, love, integrity, and risk. Mostly, it's a story about being on fire without burning up.

Review:

"They say the best nonfiction reads like fiction. But is the reverse also true? It would seem so after reading this gorgeously written debut novel, whose narrator is so keenly evoked that her reminiscences read like a memoir. Lee is one of New York's party girls extraordinaire. She's also a complete train wreck. She manages a trendy Tribeca restaurant yet can't pay the rent on a railroad flat in Brooklyn's hipster ghetto. Not many salaries could support her ravenous appetite for drugs or her taste for white knee-length furs from Bergdorf's. Still in mourning over her mother's death two years ago, Lee likens herself to a pint of raspberries: 'On top the ruby berries looked juicy. Unwrapped and spilled into the colander, they revealed undersides black with rot.' In deftly rendered scenes and flashbacks, Libaire introduces us to the eccentrics who occupy Lee's life: Yves, her French sugar daddy; Kelly, an enigmatic wanderer; Belinda, her reformed best friend. She's able to capture a character's essence in a single, lovely phrase, particularly Lee's mother: 'Guests would arrive at eight and find her in a damp bikini, only beginning to scour cookbooks for ideas. But the night would be unforgettable.' Laced with musings about art and marked by unexpected metaphors ('Drugs turned the cardboard box of an ordinary day into a honeycomb, dripping and blond'), the book summons consistently powerful images. But like a sloppy night of boozing recalled the morning after, some readers will wonder what the point was. More of an extended character study than a plot-focused narrative, it floats along on a cloud of Lee's narcissism, celebrating 'poverty and dependence' as glamorous, despite efforts to convince the reader otherwise. Agent, Sally Wofford-Girand. (May) Forecast: Those looking for a darker, more literary slant of chick lit would do well to check this out. Libaire's fashion sense is as well-honed as her perfectly turned phrases." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"With Here Kitty Kitty, Jardine Libaire gives chick lit a swift kick in the rump. She writes with a clipped, cinematic panache, and her deadpan decadence will remind readers of an East Coast version of Joan Didion's Play It As It Lays and Bret Easton Ellis's Less Than Zero." Kurt Wenzel, author of Gotham Tragic

Review:

"Some readers will be put off by her distinctive style, but quite a few others will be seduced by her cinematic writing and her vulnerable hipsters." Booklist

Review:

"Libaire...wisely explores her heroine's long and difficult struggle to take care of herself: to be sober, to sleep peacefully, to be alone. In the process, the author offers glittering descriptions of New York life, both its obstacles and its promise." Suzy Hansen, The New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

A new, vivid female voice takes on delight and dissolution in New York City in this dark urban adventure.

About the Author

Jardine Libaire holds an MFA from the University of Michigan. Her stories have been published in Fiction and Chick Lit, an anthology edited by Cris Mazza. She lives in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. She is 30.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780316736886
Author:
Libaire, Jardine
Publisher:
Little Brown and Company
Location:
Boston
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Young women
Subject:
Bildungsromans
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Publication Date:
May 2004
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
213
Dimensions:
8.32x5.70x.87 in. .74 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Here Kitty Kitty: A Novel Used Hardcover
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$9.95 In Stock
Product details 213 pages Little Brown and Company - English 9780316736886 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "They say the best nonfiction reads like fiction. But is the reverse also true? It would seem so after reading this gorgeously written debut novel, whose narrator is so keenly evoked that her reminiscences read like a memoir. Lee is one of New York's party girls extraordinaire. She's also a complete train wreck. She manages a trendy Tribeca restaurant yet can't pay the rent on a railroad flat in Brooklyn's hipster ghetto. Not many salaries could support her ravenous appetite for drugs or her taste for white knee-length furs from Bergdorf's. Still in mourning over her mother's death two years ago, Lee likens herself to a pint of raspberries: 'On top the ruby berries looked juicy. Unwrapped and spilled into the colander, they revealed undersides black with rot.' In deftly rendered scenes and flashbacks, Libaire introduces us to the eccentrics who occupy Lee's life: Yves, her French sugar daddy; Kelly, an enigmatic wanderer; Belinda, her reformed best friend. She's able to capture a character's essence in a single, lovely phrase, particularly Lee's mother: 'Guests would arrive at eight and find her in a damp bikini, only beginning to scour cookbooks for ideas. But the night would be unforgettable.' Laced with musings about art and marked by unexpected metaphors ('Drugs turned the cardboard box of an ordinary day into a honeycomb, dripping and blond'), the book summons consistently powerful images. But like a sloppy night of boozing recalled the morning after, some readers will wonder what the point was. More of an extended character study than a plot-focused narrative, it floats along on a cloud of Lee's narcissism, celebrating 'poverty and dependence' as glamorous, despite efforts to convince the reader otherwise. Agent, Sally Wofford-Girand. (May) Forecast: Those looking for a darker, more literary slant of chick lit would do well to check this out. Libaire's fashion sense is as well-honed as her perfectly turned phrases." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "The Jazz Age had Fitzgerald, the Beat Generation had Kerouac, and now post-millennium Williamsburg has Jardine Libaire....Could Libaire's be the voice of her subculture? She certainly has the tone down. Here Kitty Kitty is irritating for the same reasons that hipsters are irritating: It is strutting, humorless, and formulaic." (read the entire Esquire review)
"Review" by , "With Here Kitty Kitty, Jardine Libaire gives chick lit a swift kick in the rump. She writes with a clipped, cinematic panache, and her deadpan decadence will remind readers of an East Coast version of Joan Didion's Play It As It Lays and Bret Easton Ellis's Less Than Zero."
"Review" by , "Some readers will be put off by her distinctive style, but quite a few others will be seduced by her cinematic writing and her vulnerable hipsters."
"Review" by , "Libaire...wisely explores her heroine's long and difficult struggle to take care of herself: to be sober, to sleep peacefully, to be alone. In the process, the author offers glittering descriptions of New York life, both its obstacles and its promise."
"Synopsis" by , A new, vivid female voice takes on delight and dissolution in New York City in this dark urban adventure.
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