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1 Beaverton Health and Medicine- Womens Health

Flow: The Cultural Story of Menstruation

by

Flow: The Cultural Story of Menstruation Cover

ISBN13: 9780312379964
ISBN10: 031237996x
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Review-A-Day

"It becomes clear that menstruation can be understood in relation to a pervasive and ongoing confusion about what women's bodies are capable of, and what the implications might be. This is true when it comes to men's perceptions of women and their apparently baffling cycles, but it applies just as much to women's understanding of their own bodies." Eryn Loeb, Bookslut (read the entire Bookslut)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this hip, hilarious and truly eye-opening cultural history, menstruation is talked about as never before. Flow spans its fascinating, occasionally wacky and sometimes downright scary story: from mikvahs (ritual cleansing baths) to menopause, hysteria to hysterectomies — not to mention the Pill, cramps, the history of underwear, and the movie about puberty they showed you in 5th grade.

Flow answers such questions as:

  • What's the point of getting a period?
  • What did women do before pads and tampons?
  • What about new drugs that promise to end periods — a hot idea or not?
  • Sex during your period: gross or a turn-on?
  • And what's normal, anyway?

With color reproductions of (campy) historical ads and early (excruciating) femcare devices, it also provides a fascinating (and mind-boggling) gallery of this complex, personal and uniquely female process.

As irreverent as it is informative, Flow gives an everyday occurrence its true props — and eradicates the stigma placed on it for centuries.

Review:

"Written like a sassy young women's magazine with first-person narrative and the occasional astonished exclamation point, a normally taboo topic claims attention with the surprising-and sometimes horrifying-history of cultural reactions to menstruation (Pliny believed menstrual blood was toxic to flora and fauna), feminine 'hygiene,' and the enticing yet under-researched future of period-free birth control methods. Sprinkled throughout with entertainingly naïve ads from each era of the 20th-century as well as many references to scientific findings, author and graphic designer Stein and Kim, a graphic novelist (Circle of Spies) and writer of the play adaptation of The Joy Luck Club, evoke a light-hearted tone about their serious subject. They cover everything from menarche to menopause, including what menstruation is (which receives an outstandingly clear explanation) plus an enlightening discussion of the pad v. tampon debate, which at bottom was a sophisticated marketing strategy. Perfect for a preteen's introduction to adulthood and for women of all ages, this is guaranteed to spark conversation about old early sanitary technology (belts and pins), the pad's evolution, during WWI, when nurses found cellulose bandages more absorbent than plain cotton, and whether this universal female experience is a blessing, a curse-or just part of life." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

In this hip, funny, and irreverent book, menstruation is explored historically and socially. This full-color book not only offers a trove of fascinating information, but presents a pictorial history of this complex, secret, and uniquely female process.

Synopsis:

In this hip, hilarious and truly eye-opening cultural history, menstruation is talked about as never before. Flow spans its fascinating, occasionally wacky and sometimes downright scary story: from mikvahs (ritual cleansing baths) to menopause, hysteria to hysterectomies—not to mention the Pill, cramps, the history of underwear, and the movie about puberty they showed you in 5th grade.

Flow answers such questions as: Whats the point of getting a period? What did women do before pads and tampons? What about new drugs that promise to end periods—a hot idea or not? Sex during your period: gross or a turn-on? And whats normal, anyway?  With color reproductions of (campy) historical ads and early (excruciating) femcare devices, it also provides a fascinating (and mind-boggling) gallery of this complex, personal and uniquely female process.

As irreverent as it is informative, Flow gives an everyday occurrence its true props – and eradicates the stigma placed on it for centuries.

Elissa Steins most current publishing projects include NYC adventures with kids, interactive thank you notes, and visual histories of iconic pop culture—two of which were featured in Entertainment Weeklys Must Have list. In addition to writing, she runs her own graphic design business.  She lives in the West Village with her husband Jon and their children, Izzy and Jack.

Susan Kim wrote the stage adaptation of The Joy Luck Club and numerous one-act plays, which have been produced widely. She is an Writers Guild award-winning TV writer in documentary and children's programming, and has been nonimated five times for the Emmy. She teaches dramatic writing in the MFA program of Goddard College and lives in New York City with playwright Laurence Klavan.

This hip, revealing cultural history discusses menstruation as it has never been discussed before. Flow spans its fascinating, occasionally wacky and sometimes downright scary story: from mikvahs (ritual cleansing baths) to menopause, hysteria to hysterectomies—not to mention the Pill, cramps, the history of underwear, and the movie about puberty they show in fifth grade.

Flow answers such questions as: Whats the point of getting a period? What did women do before pads and tampons? What about new drugs that promise to end periods—a hot idea or not? Sex during your period: gross or a turn-on? And whats normal, anyway?  With color reproductions of (campy) historical ads and early (excruciating) femcare devices, it also provides a fascinating (and mind-boggling) gallery of this complex, personal and uniquely female process.

As irreverent as it is informative, Flow provides a cultural context for an everyday occurrence, and challenges a centuries-old stigma.

“Its contents, I found, are plainspoken—perhaps it will start chipping away at the taboo . . . the style is important and groundbreaking.”—The New Yorker

“In many ways, Flow is a breakthrough.”—Daily Beast

Flow isnt just a book; its a movement.”—January Magazine

“A witty look at the history of 'the nuisance' . . . for women of all agees. Who hasnt wondered why we get a period, what women did before the invention of the tampon—let alone the pad. Flow explains all.”—Body And Soul Magazine

“Quite educational, while keeping you laughing. There are some amazing factoids in here . . . And the vintage ads are fab. Courteney Cox Arquette was the first person to say period in a commercial. I believe that Cybil Sheppard and Laurie Laughlin are in a few ads too. Did you know that the Hite Report didn't say anything about our periods?”—Viva La Feminista

“There is probably no better book for moms who want their daughters to respect themselves in every aspect . . . One can only ask Stein and Kim, 'What took you so long?”—Booklist

"With wit, sarcasm, and common sense . . . the authors convey a great deal of information in an approachable and straightforward way . . . An entertaining and insightful book for women of all ages."—Library Journal

“Perfect for a preteens introduction to adulthood and for women of all ages, this is guaranteed to spark conversation about . . . whether this universal female experience is a blessing, a curse—or just part of life.”—Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Elissa Steins most current publishing projects include NYC adventures with kids, interactive thank you notes, and visual histories of iconic pop culture—two of which were featured in Entertainment Weeklys Must Have list. In addition to writing, she runs her own graphic design business.  She lives in the West Village with her husband Jon and their children, Izzy and Jack.

Susan Kim wrote the stage adaptation of The Joy Luck Club and numerous one-act plays, which have been produced widely. She is an Writers Guild award-winning TV writer in documentary and children's programming, and has been nonimated five times for the Emmy. She teaches dramatic writing in the MFA program of Goddard College and lives in New York City with playwright Laurence Klavan.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Christin, August 11, 2012 (view all comments by Christin)
This book traced historical attitudes toward menstruation, as well as the products and medical interventions developed to deal with it, mostly from an American perspective, but with occasional dips into ancient history as well. It also focused a lot on the role of advertising and its influence on our feelings toward menstruation.

This could have been a depressing and frustrating book, but the authors wrote in such a friendly, chatty tone and really emphasized the ridiculous nature of a lot of what they were talking about, that it actually turned out pretty funny and entertaining, as well as informative. The funniest part was definitely the chapter covering advertisements of pads, tampons, douches and other associated products. There was a lot of mocking of the vague language used, like when they demanded to know what, specifically, all this generic ”protection” the ads were talking about meant. Like, protection from bullets and malaria? I also really liked the last chapter, which offered all kinds of alternatives. Like, alternative products for dealing with menstrual flow (like cloth pads and the Diva cup), as well as alternative ways of thinking about and treating our periods.

This was an interesting book and a good starter for a conversation we kind of desperately need in our culture.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
mybodymyself, February 16, 2010 (view all comments by mybodymyself)
Found out it about while browsing one of the local book stores in my area, wk ago (fri). Wasn't that crazy about it in the beginning, but in the end I was crazy about.

Heres my review of this it and even though I'm half though it. Have to say its well worth the purchase and can't wait to read the rest of it. Do intend to keep this book after I'm finished reading it as well. Should require reading for everyone no matter what.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312379964
Subtitle:
The Cultural Story of Menstruation
Author:
Stein, Elissa
Author:
Susan, Kim
Author:
Kim, Susan
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin
Subject:
Women's Health - General
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Menstruation -- Social aspects.
Subject:
Physiology
Subject:
Women's Health.
Subject:
Women's Studies
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Womens Health
Subject:
Form/Trivia
Subject:
Social history
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paper Over Board
Publication Date:
20091110
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes color illustrations and photogr
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.00 x 7.00 in

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Menopause
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Menstruation
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Womens Health
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies

Flow: The Cultural Story of Menstruation Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages St. Martin's Griffin - English 9780312379964 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Written like a sassy young women's magazine with first-person narrative and the occasional astonished exclamation point, a normally taboo topic claims attention with the surprising-and sometimes horrifying-history of cultural reactions to menstruation (Pliny believed menstrual blood was toxic to flora and fauna), feminine 'hygiene,' and the enticing yet under-researched future of period-free birth control methods. Sprinkled throughout with entertainingly naïve ads from each era of the 20th-century as well as many references to scientific findings, author and graphic designer Stein and Kim, a graphic novelist (Circle of Spies) and writer of the play adaptation of The Joy Luck Club, evoke a light-hearted tone about their serious subject. They cover everything from menarche to menopause, including what menstruation is (which receives an outstandingly clear explanation) plus an enlightening discussion of the pad v. tampon debate, which at bottom was a sophisticated marketing strategy. Perfect for a preteen's introduction to adulthood and for women of all ages, this is guaranteed to spark conversation about old early sanitary technology (belts and pins), the pad's evolution, during WWI, when nurses found cellulose bandages more absorbent than plain cotton, and whether this universal female experience is a blessing, a curse-or just part of life." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "It becomes clear that menstruation can be understood in relation to a pervasive and ongoing confusion about what women's bodies are capable of, and what the implications might be. This is true when it comes to men's perceptions of women and their apparently baffling cycles, but it applies just as much to women's understanding of their own bodies." (read the entire Bookslut)
"Synopsis" by , In this hip, funny, and irreverent book, menstruation is explored historically and socially. This full-color book not only offers a trove of fascinating information, but presents a pictorial history of this complex, secret, and uniquely female process.
"Synopsis" by ,

In this hip, hilarious and truly eye-opening cultural history, menstruation is talked about as never before. Flow spans its fascinating, occasionally wacky and sometimes downright scary story: from mikvahs (ritual cleansing baths) to menopause, hysteria to hysterectomies—not to mention the Pill, cramps, the history of underwear, and the movie about puberty they showed you in 5th grade.

Flow answers such questions as: Whats the point of getting a period? What did women do before pads and tampons? What about new drugs that promise to end periods—a hot idea or not? Sex during your period: gross or a turn-on? And whats normal, anyway?  With color reproductions of (campy) historical ads and early (excruciating) femcare devices, it also provides a fascinating (and mind-boggling) gallery of this complex, personal and uniquely female process.

As irreverent as it is informative, Flow gives an everyday occurrence its true props – and eradicates the stigma placed on it for centuries.

Elissa Steins most current publishing projects include NYC adventures with kids, interactive thank you notes, and visual histories of iconic pop culture—two of which were featured in Entertainment Weeklys Must Have list. In addition to writing, she runs her own graphic design business.  She lives in the West Village with her husband Jon and their children, Izzy and Jack.

Susan Kim wrote the stage adaptation of The Joy Luck Club and numerous one-act plays, which have been produced widely. She is an Writers Guild award-winning TV writer in documentary and children's programming, and has been nonimated five times for the Emmy. She teaches dramatic writing in the MFA program of Goddard College and lives in New York City with playwright Laurence Klavan.

This hip, revealing cultural history discusses menstruation as it has never been discussed before. Flow spans its fascinating, occasionally wacky and sometimes downright scary story: from mikvahs (ritual cleansing baths) to menopause, hysteria to hysterectomies—not to mention the Pill, cramps, the history of underwear, and the movie about puberty they show in fifth grade.

Flow answers such questions as: Whats the point of getting a period? What did women do before pads and tampons? What about new drugs that promise to end periods—a hot idea or not? Sex during your period: gross or a turn-on? And whats normal, anyway?  With color reproductions of (campy) historical ads and early (excruciating) femcare devices, it also provides a fascinating (and mind-boggling) gallery of this complex, personal and uniquely female process.

As irreverent as it is informative, Flow provides a cultural context for an everyday occurrence, and challenges a centuries-old stigma.

“Its contents, I found, are plainspoken—perhaps it will start chipping away at the taboo . . . the style is important and groundbreaking.”—The New Yorker

“In many ways, Flow is a breakthrough.”—Daily Beast

Flow isnt just a book; its a movement.”—January Magazine

“A witty look at the history of 'the nuisance' . . . for women of all agees. Who hasnt wondered why we get a period, what women did before the invention of the tampon—let alone the pad. Flow explains all.”—Body And Soul Magazine

“Quite educational, while keeping you laughing. There are some amazing factoids in here . . . And the vintage ads are fab. Courteney Cox Arquette was the first person to say period in a commercial. I believe that Cybil Sheppard and Laurie Laughlin are in a few ads too. Did you know that the Hite Report didn't say anything about our periods?”—Viva La Feminista

“There is probably no better book for moms who want their daughters to respect themselves in every aspect . . . One can only ask Stein and Kim, 'What took you so long?”—Booklist

"With wit, sarcasm, and common sense . . . the authors convey a great deal of information in an approachable and straightforward way . . . An entertaining and insightful book for women of all ages."—Library Journal

“Perfect for a preteens introduction to adulthood and for women of all ages, this is guaranteed to spark conversation about . . . whether this universal female experience is a blessing, a curse—or just part of life.”—Publishers Weekly

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