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Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President

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Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President Cover

ISBN13: 9780814758342
ISBN10: 0814758347
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would be President, prize-winning legal historian Jill Norgren recounts, for the first time, the life story of one of the nineteenth century's most surprising and accomplished advocates for women's rights. As Norgren shows, Lockwood was fearless in confronting the male establishment, commanding the attention of presidents, members of Congress, influential writers, and everyday Americans. Obscured for too long in the historical shadow of her longtime colleague, Susan B. Anthony, Lockwood steps into the limelight at last in this engaging new biography.

Born on a farm in upstate New York in 1830, Lockwood married young and reluctantly became a farmer's wife. After her husband's premature death, however, she earned a college degree, became a teacher, and moved to Washington, DC with plans to become an attorney-an occupation all but closed to women. Not only did she become one of the first female attorneys in the U.S., but in 1879 became the first woman ever allowed to practice at the bar of the Supreme Court.

In 1884 Lockwood continued her trailblazing ways as the first woman to run a full campaign for the U.S. Presidency. She ran for President again in 1888. Although her candidacies were unsuccessful (as she knew they would be), Lockwood demonstrated that women could compete with men in the political arena. After these campaigns she worked tirelessly on behalf of the Universal Peace Union, hoping, until her death in 1917, that she, or the organization, would win the Nobel Peace Prize.

Belva Lockwood deserves to be far better known. As Norgren notes, it is likely that Lockwood would be widely recognized today as a feminist pioneer if most of her personal papers had not been destroyed after her death. Fortunately for readers, Norgren shares much of her subject's tenacity and she has ensured Lockwood's rightful place in history with this meticulously researched and beautifully written book.

Review:

"Long before Hillary Clinton, there was Belva Lockwood: two-time presidential hopeful, Lockwood campaigned in 1884 and 1888 on a platform of women's suffrage. In the first full-length biography of this feminist pioneer, legal historian Norgren has meticulously researched what little has remained of Lockwood's papers, most of which were destroyed after her death. Lockwood was, in a word, tenacious: one of the first female lawyers in the country, she was the very first woman to be admitted to the U.S. Supreme Court Bar, an episode that Norgren recounts in moving detail. Glimpses of Lockwood's less-heroic side emerge as well, and it's to Norgren's credit that Lockwood's controversial views on Mormons, Native Americans and freed slaves are placed in their proper historical context, but aren't necessarily forgiven. Indeed, fights with other suffragists and a seemingly inexhaustible well of self-regard are featured alongside Lockwood's many strengths and accomplishments. Norgren never reaches beyond the facts of the record, rarely speculating on Lockwood's intentions, thoughts or purpose — a plus for those who like their biography embellishment-free, but a definite minus for more casual readers, who may find Lockwood too distant to rouse sympathy. Illustrations." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Jill Norgren beautifully weaves the personal and political ordeals of Belva Lockwood's life into a compelling story that illuminates Lockwood's enduring contributions. This is a dramatic account of a pioneering woman whose life in the law still resonates in contemporary times." Joan Biskupic, author of Sandra Day O'Connor: How the First Woman on the Supreme Court Became Its Most influential Justice

Review:

"Jill Norgren's splendid biography of one of history's most astonishing pioneers — first woman counsel before the Supreme Court, visionary for equal rights, international peace activist, Indian rights litigator, presidential candidate — is provocative, challenging, galvanizing! Brilliantly researched, vividly written, and profoundly discerning. Everybody concerned about justice, human rights, the future of democracy, and women's power will rush to read, and assign, this important book." Blanche Wiesen Cook, author of Eleanor Roosevelt

Review:

"In this thoroughly researched and beautifully written biography, Jill Norgren traces Belva Lockwood's dogged efforts to earn a living as a lawyer in Washington while caring for her daughter and becoming a leading advocate for woman's suffrage and the peaceful arbitration of international disputes. Norgren's brilliant study makes clear why Lockwood — the first woman to argue before the Supreme Court (1879) and run for President (1884 and 1888) — belongs in the ranks of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Frances Willard." John M. Ferren, author of Salt of the Earth, Conscience of the Court: the Story of Justice Wiley Rutledge

Synopsis:

Foreword by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

In Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President, prize-winning legal historian Jill Norgren recounts, for the first time, the life story of one of the nineteenth centurys most surprising and accomplished advocates for womens rights. As Norgren shows, Lockwood was fearless in confronting the male establishment, commanding the attention of presidents, members of Congress, influential writers, and everyday Americans. Obscured for too long in the historical shadow of her longtime colleague, Susan B. Anthony, Lockwood steps into the limelight at last in this engaging new biography.

Born on a farm in upstate New York in 1830, Lockwood married young and reluctantly became a farmers wife. After her husband's premature death, however, she earned a college degree, became a teacher, and moved to Washington, DC with plans to become an attorney-an occupation all but closed to women. Not only did she become one of the first female attorneys in the U.S., but in 1879 became the first woman ever allowed to practice at the bar of the Supreme Court.

In 1884 Lockwood continued her trailblazing ways as the first woman to run a full campaign for the U.S. Presidency. She ran for President again in 1888. Although her candidacies were unsuccessful (as she knew they would be), Lockwood demonstrated that women could compete with men in the political arena. After these campaigns she worked tirelessly on behalf of the Universal Peace Union, hoping, until her death in 1917, that she, or the organization, would win the Nobel Peace Prize.

Belva Lockwood deserves to be far better known. As Norgren notes, it is likely that Lockwood would be widely recognized today as a feminist pioneer if most of her personal papers had not been destroyed after her death. Fortunately for readers, Norgren shares much of her subjects tenacity and she has ensured Lockwoods rightful place in history with this meticulously researched and beautifully written book.

Synopsis:

In the 1930s, almost five million Jews lived in central Eastern Europe. Ninety percent of these lives were lost in the Holocaust, and the most optimistic estimate puts the number of Jews in that region today at 150,000. Through words and pictures, The Face of Survival tells the story behind the statistics of Eastern European Jewry since the turn of the century, a story that is one of survival as well as destruction.

The Face of Survival combines over one hundred never before published photographs with narrative and autobiographical text to capture Jewish life, history and culture in Eastern Europe, revealing the vitality and fortitude of a people determined to survive in the face of enormous odds. Despite new ambiguities since the collapse of Communism, as well as intermarriage, emigration, and renewed anti-Semitism, Jews continue to live as Jews in Eastern Europe.

The photographs presented here attest to the survival of these communities, testimony to the tenacity and courage of individuals as well as to the strength of Jewish cohesiveness.

About the Author

Jill Norgren is Professor Emerita of Government at John Jay College and the Graduate Center of The City University of New York. Her articles have received awards from the American Society for Legal History and the United States Supreme Court Historical Society. Her books include The Cherokee Cases: The Confrontation of Law and Politics and American Cultural Pluralism and Law (with Serena Nanda).

Table of Contents

Foreword by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ix
Prologue and Acknowledgments xiii

1 Early a Widow 1
2 In Search of a New Identity 14
3 Apprenticeship 27
4 Becoming a Lawyer 40
5 Notorious Ladies 53
6 A Tougher Fight 67
7 Woman Lawyer 84
8 The Practice of Law 98
9 Lady Lobbyist 110
10 Lockwood for President 124
11 Life on the Platform 143
12 Lay Down Your Arms! 155
13 The Power of Association 169
14 Pushing for Place 182
15 AWorld’s Fair and a Million-Dollar Case 194
16 Aging Soldiers of Cause 212

Epilogue 228
Notes 233
Index 291 About the Author 311

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

rollyson2002, September 16, 2012 (view all comments by rollyson2002)
Book Review
Belva Lockwood
by Jill Norgren
Jill Norgren has quite a story to tell. Belva Lockwood (1830��"1917) had to wage an arduous campaign just to get into law school and after completing the course she was refused a degree. An expert lobbyist who befriended influential congressmen, Lockwood marshaled her forces, eventually obtained her diploma, and then had to wage another battle to be admitted to the Washington, D.C., bar. And that was hardly the last public struggle for the first woman to argue a case before the Supreme Court and to conduct the first full campaign for the presidency.

In her new biography, "Belva Lockwood" (New York University Press, 311 pages, $35) Ms. Norgren, a legal historian, explains that she first learned of Lockwood while helping her daughter select books in the children's section at the public library. "I knew nothing about the woman or her accomplishments," Ms. Norgren writes, "virtually none of my university colleagues knew her name."

More biographers ��" more scholars ��" should read biographies intended for children, which can serve as a syncretic introduction to the biographical subject. It is shame that Ms. Norgren does not identify the biography she first put in her daughter's hands.

So why has Lockwood languished in biographical purdah? Ms. Norgren faults fashion: the appetite for biographies of "Founding Fathers and fighting generals." Well, sure, but other women of Lockwood's stature have attracted their fair share of biographers.

More to the point, Lockwood's niece, an amateur biographer, never completed the job. At the time, few libraries collected the papers of notable women, Ms. Norgren points out. And then Lockwood's closest surviving relative, a grandson, unforgivably sent her papers off to the Salvation Army as scrap paper that was later pulped.

Many biographers would balk at the paucity of archival sources. But Ms. Norgren persisted, calculating rightly that she would find important traces of Lockwood in others' papers. Lockwood also wrote about her life and published frequently. Newspapers covered her activities. As a practicing lawyer, she appears in all manner of other records, as well.

In Ms. Norgren's credible narrative, Lockwood emerges as a shrewd self-promoter, never hesitating to garner publicity for herself and her causes. After a brief first marriage and the birth of a daughter, Lockwood started on her public career. A second marriage to a much older man was agreeable but also strategic, for Lockwood did not hesitate to use her husband's business contacts to corral her own clients. Nellie Bly, the New York World's "daredevil girl reporter," pronounced Lockwood a worthy presidential candidate, calling her a "womanly woman … intelligent without being manly … the beau ideal of a woman with a brain."

In eloquent detail, Ms. Norgren shows how Lockwood loved the law. As a solo practitioner, she went after all sorts of cases: civil actions, divorces, and criminal trials. Lockwood ventured into other states acting on behalf of clients, and she helped to set up networks of female lawyers who could help one another.

When Ms. Norgren falters, it is hardly her fault. With so much private correspondence missing, it is difficult to picture the private Lockwood. In more intimate settings, was she always able to put on such a brave face? Was she really so unruffled by male chauvinism?

Ms. Norgren could make a little more of Lockwood's personality. An amusing episode, for example, shows Lockwood in motion, deflecting the sort of criticism that made other feminists fume. In 1881, to get to her appointments quickly, Lockwood adopted the then exclusively male practice of riding a large tricycle on the streets of Washington, D.C. The press attacked this unladylike behavior, lampooning it in cartoons and even speculating that it might ruin the "feminine organs of matrimonial necessity."

While certain feminists like Susan B. Anthony made an ideological issue out of the controversy, proclaiming the bicycle an instrument of female emancipation, Lockwood composed a poem:

A simple home woman, who only had thought
To lighten the labors her business had wrought.
And make a machine serve the purpose of feet.
And at the same time keep her dress from the street.

Ms. Norgren calls this ditty "light-hearted," an expression of Lockwood's amusement at the hullabaloo. So it is, but it also demonstrates how Lockwood got ahead, making her vehicle seem like the natural extension of a successful woman's work, while also reminding readers of the alternately muddy and dusty streets of the capital that made it difficult to preserve ladylike behavior.

This episode would be a good way to begin a Lockwood biography ��" one perhaps a children's biographer could use as a means of amplifying Ms. Norgren's sober-sided book.

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Product Details

ISBN:
9780814758342
Author:
Norgren, Jill
Publisher:
New York University Press
Foreword by:
Ginsburg, Ruth Bader
Foreword:
Ginsburg, Ruth Bader
Author:
Riff, Michael
Subject:
General
Subject:
Lawyers
Subject:
Women lawyers
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Biography-Historical
Subject:
Judaism - History
Publication Date:
20070331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
311
Dimensions:
6 x 9 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » Historical
Biography » Women
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to 1945

Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President New Hardcover
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Product details 311 pages New York University Press - English 9780814758342 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Long before Hillary Clinton, there was Belva Lockwood: two-time presidential hopeful, Lockwood campaigned in 1884 and 1888 on a platform of women's suffrage. In the first full-length biography of this feminist pioneer, legal historian Norgren has meticulously researched what little has remained of Lockwood's papers, most of which were destroyed after her death. Lockwood was, in a word, tenacious: one of the first female lawyers in the country, she was the very first woman to be admitted to the U.S. Supreme Court Bar, an episode that Norgren recounts in moving detail. Glimpses of Lockwood's less-heroic side emerge as well, and it's to Norgren's credit that Lockwood's controversial views on Mormons, Native Americans and freed slaves are placed in their proper historical context, but aren't necessarily forgiven. Indeed, fights with other suffragists and a seemingly inexhaustible well of self-regard are featured alongside Lockwood's many strengths and accomplishments. Norgren never reaches beyond the facts of the record, rarely speculating on Lockwood's intentions, thoughts or purpose — a plus for those who like their biography embellishment-free, but a definite minus for more casual readers, who may find Lockwood too distant to rouse sympathy. Illustrations." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Jill Norgren beautifully weaves the personal and political ordeals of Belva Lockwood's life into a compelling story that illuminates Lockwood's enduring contributions. This is a dramatic account of a pioneering woman whose life in the law still resonates in contemporary times." Joan Biskupic, author of Sandra Day O'Connor: How the First Woman on the Supreme Court Became Its Most influential Justice
"Review" by , "Jill Norgren's splendid biography of one of history's most astonishing pioneers — first woman counsel before the Supreme Court, visionary for equal rights, international peace activist, Indian rights litigator, presidential candidate — is provocative, challenging, galvanizing! Brilliantly researched, vividly written, and profoundly discerning. Everybody concerned about justice, human rights, the future of democracy, and women's power will rush to read, and assign, this important book."
"Review" by , "In this thoroughly researched and beautifully written biography, Jill Norgren traces Belva Lockwood's dogged efforts to earn a living as a lawyer in Washington while caring for her daughter and becoming a leading advocate for woman's suffrage and the peaceful arbitration of international disputes. Norgren's brilliant study makes clear why Lockwood — the first woman to argue before the Supreme Court (1879) and run for President (1884 and 1888) — belongs in the ranks of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Frances Willard." John M. Ferren, author of Salt of the Earth, Conscience of the Court: the Story of Justice Wiley Rutledge
"Synopsis" by , Foreword by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

In Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President, prize-winning legal historian Jill Norgren recounts, for the first time, the life story of one of the nineteenth centurys most surprising and accomplished advocates for womens rights. As Norgren shows, Lockwood was fearless in confronting the male establishment, commanding the attention of presidents, members of Congress, influential writers, and everyday Americans. Obscured for too long in the historical shadow of her longtime colleague, Susan B. Anthony, Lockwood steps into the limelight at last in this engaging new biography.

Born on a farm in upstate New York in 1830, Lockwood married young and reluctantly became a farmers wife. After her husband's premature death, however, she earned a college degree, became a teacher, and moved to Washington, DC with plans to become an attorney-an occupation all but closed to women. Not only did she become one of the first female attorneys in the U.S., but in 1879 became the first woman ever allowed to practice at the bar of the Supreme Court.

In 1884 Lockwood continued her trailblazing ways as the first woman to run a full campaign for the U.S. Presidency. She ran for President again in 1888. Although her candidacies were unsuccessful (as she knew they would be), Lockwood demonstrated that women could compete with men in the political arena. After these campaigns she worked tirelessly on behalf of the Universal Peace Union, hoping, until her death in 1917, that she, or the organization, would win the Nobel Peace Prize.

Belva Lockwood deserves to be far better known. As Norgren notes, it is likely that Lockwood would be widely recognized today as a feminist pioneer if most of her personal papers had not been destroyed after her death. Fortunately for readers, Norgren shares much of her subjects tenacity and she has ensured Lockwoods rightful place in history with this meticulously researched and beautifully written book.

"Synopsis" by , In the 1930s, almost five million Jews lived in central Eastern Europe. Ninety percent of these lives were lost in the Holocaust, and the most optimistic estimate puts the number of Jews in that region today at 150,000. Through words and pictures, The Face of Survival tells the story behind the statistics of Eastern European Jewry since the turn of the century, a story that is one of survival as well as destruction.

The Face of Survival combines over one hundred never before published photographs with narrative and autobiographical text to capture Jewish life, history and culture in Eastern Europe, revealing the vitality and fortitude of a people determined to survive in the face of enormous odds. Despite new ambiguities since the collapse of Communism, as well as intermarriage, emigration, and renewed anti-Semitism, Jews continue to live as Jews in Eastern Europe.

The photographs presented here attest to the survival of these communities, testimony to the tenacity and courage of individuals as well as to the strength of Jewish cohesiveness.

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