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The Towers of Trebizond (New York Review of Books Classics)

by

The Towers of Trebizond (New York Review of Books Classics) Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Again and again while bookstore browsing in the last few years, I've come across something the NYRB has published that I've never heard of, taken it home, and felt like I've discovered a little treasure. That was how I felt reading The Towers of Trebizond, a small miracle of a novel by Rose Macaulay. Jan Morris' introduction informs us that this 1956 novel, Macaulay's last, was a critical and commercial hit on both sides of the Atlantic. How did it ever fall into obscurity?" Charles Taylor, Salon.com (read the entire Salon.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"'Take my camel, dear,' said my aunt Dot." So begins Rose Macaulay?s greatest novel. Traveling overland from Istanbul to legendary Trebizond, the narrator and her companions have a series of hilarious encounters with potion-dealing sorcerers, recalcitrant policemen, and an ever-appearing busload of southern evangelists. But though the dominant note of this very unusual novel is humorous, the import is often tragic — as along the way the narrator confronts the specter of ancient empires, religious doubt, and individual heartbreak. This award-winning book is fine, funny, and unique travel adventure.

Review:

"Rose Macaulay's The Towers of Trebizond is an utter delight, the most brilliantly witty and captivatingly charming book I have read since I can't remember when....Fantasy, farce, high comedy, lively travel material, delicious japes at many aspects of the frenzied modern world, and a succession of illuminating thoughts about love, sex, life, organized churches and religion are all tossed together with enchanting results." The New York Times

Review:

"The Towers of Trebizond is not an encyclopedia in disguise. It is a novel and a good one." Maurice Dobier

Synopsis:

"'Take my camel, dear,' said my aunt Dot, as she climbed down from this animal on her return from High Mass." So begins The Towers of Trebizond, the greatest novel by Rose Macaulay, one of the eccentric geniuses of English literature. In this fine and funny adventure set in the backlands of modern Turkey, a group of highly unusual travel companions makes its way from Istanbul to legendary Trebizond, encountering potion-dealing sorcerers, recalcitrant policemen, and Billy Graham on tour with a busload of Southern evangelists. But though the dominant note of the novel is humorous, its pages are shadowed by heartbreak—as the narrator confronts the specters of ancient empires, religious turmoil, and painful memories of lost love.

About the Author

Rose Macaulay (1881-1958) was born in Rugby, England, into a family of eminent scholars and Anglican clerics. The second of seven children, a tomboy who hoped one day to join the Navy, she spent much of her childhood in Varezze, a small Italian seaside town, where she enjoyed considerable independence for an English child of her era. In 1894, her family returned to Britain, and after studying modern history at Somerville College, Oxford, she began a career as a writer and quickly succeeded in supporting herself as a novelist, journalist, and critic. During World War I, she worked as a nurse and as a civil servant in the War Office before assuming a position in the British Propaganda Department. There she met Gerald O'Donovan, a sometime Irish Catholic priest, novelist, and married man, with whom she had a romantic relationship which was to last until his death in 1942. Rose Macaulay was the author of thirty-five books — twenty-three of them novels — and is best remembered for Potterism, a satire of yellow journalism; a biography of Milton; her haunting post-World War II novel, The World My Wilderness; two travel books, They Went to Portugal and Fabled Shore; and her masterpiece, The Towers of Trebizond. A mentor to Elizabeth Bowen and a friend to such luminaries as Ivy Compton-Burnett, Rupert Brooke, E.M. Forster, and Rosamond Lehmann, Macaulay was a well-known figure in London's literary world and a fabled wit. She was named a Dame Commander of the British Empire shortly before her death in 1958.

Jan Morris was born in 1926, is Anglo-Welsh, and lives in Wales. She has written some forty books, including the Pax Britannica trilogy about the British Empire, studies of Wales, Spain, Venice, Oxford, Manhattan, Sydney, Hong Kong, and Trieste, six volumes of collected travel essays, two memoirs, two capricious biographies, and a couple of novels — but she defines her entire oeuvre as "disguised autobiography." She is an honorary D.Litt. of the University of Wales and a Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590170588
Introduction by:
Morris, Jan
Publisher:
NYRB Classics
Introduction by:
Morris, Jan
Introduction:
Morris, Jan
Author:
Macaulay, Rose
Author:
Various
Author:
Morris, Jan
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Young women
Subject:
British
Subject:
FICTION / Literary
Subject:
Humorous fiction
Subject:
Bildungsromans
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Reprint ed.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
New York Review Books Classics
Publication Date:
January 2004
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
296
Dimensions:
7.96x5.03x.67 in. .61 lbs.

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Related Subjects

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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books

The Towers of Trebizond (New York Review of Books Classics) Sale Trade Paper
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$7.98 In Stock
Product details 296 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590170588 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "Again and again while bookstore browsing in the last few years, I've come across something the NYRB has published that I've never heard of, taken it home, and felt like I've discovered a little treasure. That was how I felt reading The Towers of Trebizond, a small miracle of a novel by Rose Macaulay. Jan Morris' introduction informs us that this 1956 novel, Macaulay's last, was a critical and commercial hit on both sides of the Atlantic. How did it ever fall into obscurity?" (read the entire Salon.com review)
"Review" by , "Rose Macaulay's The Towers of Trebizond is an utter delight, the most brilliantly witty and captivatingly charming book I have read since I can't remember when....Fantasy, farce, high comedy, lively travel material, delicious japes at many aspects of the frenzied modern world, and a succession of illuminating thoughts about love, sex, life, organized churches and religion are all tossed together with enchanting results."
"Review" by , "The Towers of Trebizond is not an encyclopedia in disguise. It is a novel and a good one."
"Synopsis" by , "'Take my camel, dear,' said my aunt Dot, as she climbed down from this animal on her return from High Mass." So begins The Towers of Trebizond, the greatest novel by Rose Macaulay, one of the eccentric geniuses of English literature. In this fine and funny adventure set in the backlands of modern Turkey, a group of highly unusual travel companions makes its way from Istanbul to legendary Trebizond, encountering potion-dealing sorcerers, recalcitrant policemen, and Billy Graham on tour with a busload of Southern evangelists. But though the dominant note of the novel is humorous, its pages are shadowed by heartbreak—as the narrator confronts the specters of ancient empires, religious turmoil, and painful memories of lost love.
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