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Enemies of Promise

by

Enemies of Promise Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Whom the gods wish to destroy,” writes Cyril Connolly, “they first call promising.” First published in 1938 and long out of print, Enemies of Promise, an “inquiry into the problem of how to write a book that lasts ten years,” tests the boundaries of criticism, journalism, and autobiography with the blistering prose that became Connollys trademark. Connolly here confronts the evils of domesticity, politics, drink, and advertising as well as novelists such as Joyce, Proust, Hemingway, and Faulkner in essays that remain fresh and penetrating to this day.

 

 “A fine critic, compulsive traveler, and candid autobiographer. . . . [Connolly] lays down the law for all writers who wanted to count. . . . He had imagination and decisive images flashed with the speed of wit in his mind.”—V. S. Pritchett, New York Review of Books

 

“Anyone who writes, or wants to write, will find something on just about every single page that either endorses a long-held prejudice or outrages, and that makes it a pretty compelling read. . . . You end up muttering back at just about every ornately constructed pensée that Connolly utters, but thats one of the joys of this book.”—Nick Hornby, The Believer

 

“A remarkable book.”—Anthony Powell

 

 

Synopsis:

“Whom the gods wish to destroy,” writes Cyril Connolly, “they first call promising.” First published in 1938 and long out of print, Enemies of Promise, an “inquiry into the problem of how to write a book that lasts ten years,” tests the boundaries of criticism, journalism, and autobiography with the blistering prose that became Connolly’s trademark. Connolly here confronts the evils of domesticity, politics, drink, and advertising as well as novelists such as Joyce, Proust, Hemingway, and Faulkner in essays that remain fresh and penetrating to this day.

 

 “A fine critic, compulsive traveler, and candid autobiographer. . . . [Connolly] lays down the law for all writers who wanted to count. . . . He had imagination and decisive images flashed with the speed of wit in his mind.”—V. S. Pritchett, New York Review of Books

 

“Anyone who writes, or wants to write, will find something on just about every single page that either endorses a long-held prejudice or outrages, and that makes it a pretty compelling read. . . . You end up muttering back at just about every ornately constructed pensée that Connolly utters, but that’s one of the joys of this book.”—Nick Hornby, The Believer

 

“A remarkable book.”—Anthony Powell

 

 

About the Author

Cyril Connolly (1903-74) was one of the most influential critics of his time, who wrote for such publications as the New Statesman, the Observer, and the Sunday Times. He is the author of many books, including The Rock Pool and The Unquiet Grave.

 

 
 

Table of Contents

Foreword

Introduction

Part One

Predicament

I. The Next Ten Years

II. The Mandarin Dialect

III. The Challenge to the Mandarins

IV. The Modern Movement

V. Anatomy of a Dandyism

VI. A Beast in View

VII. The New Mandarins

VIII. The New Vernacular

IX. The Cool Element of Prose

Part Two

The Charlock's Shade

 

X. The Blighted Rye

XI. The Blue Bugloss

XII. The Thistles

XIII. The Poppies

XIV. The Charlock's Shade

XV. The Slimy Mallows

XVI. Outlook Unsettled

 

Part Three

A Georgian Boyhood

 

XVII. Credentials

XVIII. The Branching Ogham

XIX. White Samite

XX. Dark Ages

XXI. Renaissance

XXII. The Background of the Lilies

XXIII. Glittering Prizes

XXIV. Vale

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226115047
Author:
Connolly, Cyril
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Foreword by:
Woloch, Alex
Foreword:
Woloch, Alex
Author:
Woloch, Alex
Subject:
English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Subject:
English literature
Subject:
History and criticism
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
English literature -- 20th century.
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Publication Date:
20080531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 x 0.6 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Literary
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

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Product details 288 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226115047 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

“Whom the gods wish to destroy,” writes Cyril Connolly, “they first call promising.” First published in 1938 and long out of print, Enemies of Promise, an “inquiry into the problem of how to write a book that lasts ten years,” tests the boundaries of criticism, journalism, and autobiography with the blistering prose that became Connolly’s trademark. Connolly here confronts the evils of domesticity, politics, drink, and advertising as well as novelists such as Joyce, Proust, Hemingway, and Faulkner in essays that remain fresh and penetrating to this day.

 

 “A fine critic, compulsive traveler, and candid autobiographer. . . . [Connolly] lays down the law for all writers who wanted to count. . . . He had imagination and decisive images flashed with the speed of wit in his mind.”—V. S. Pritchett, New York Review of Books

 

“Anyone who writes, or wants to write, will find something on just about every single page that either endorses a long-held prejudice or outrages, and that makes it a pretty compelling read. . . . You end up muttering back at just about every ornately constructed pensée that Connolly utters, but that’s one of the joys of this book.”—Nick Hornby, The Believer

 

“A remarkable book.”—Anthony Powell

 

 

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