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Someone

by

Someone Cover

ISBN13: 9780374281090
ISBN10: 0374281092
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A fully realized portrait of one woman's life in all its complexity, by the National Book Award-winning author

An ordinary life — its sharp pains and unexpected joys, its bursts of clarity and moments of confusion — lived by an ordinary woman: this is the subject of Someone, Alice McDermott's extraordinary return, seven years after the publication of After This. Scattered recollections — of childhood, adolescence, motherhood, old age — come together in this transformative narrative, stitched into a vibrant whole by McDermott's deft, lyrical voice.

Our first glimpse of Marie is as a child: a girl in glasses waiting on a Brooklyn stoop for her beloved father to come home from work. A seemingly innocuous encounter with a young woman named Pegeen sets the bittersweet tone of this remarkable novel. Pegeen describes herself as an “amadan,” a fool; indeed, soon after her chat with Marie, Pegeen tumbles down her own basement stairs. The magic of McDermott's novel lies in how it reveals us all as fools for this or that, in one way or another.

Marie's first heartbreak and her eventual marriage; her brother's brief stint as a Catholic priest, subsequent loss of faith, and eventual breakdown; the Second World War; her parents' deaths; the births and lives of Marie's children; the changing world of her Irish-American enclave in Brooklyn — McDermott sketches all of it with sympathy and insight. This is a novel that speaks of life as it is daily lived; a crowning achievement by one of the finest American writers at work today.

Review:

"In this deceptively simple tour de force, McDermott (Charming Billy, winner of the National Book Award) lays bare the keenly observed life of Marie Commeford, an ordinary woman whose compromised eyesight makes her both figuratively and literally unable to see the world for what it is. When we meet her on the steps of her Brooklyn townhouse, she's a bespectacled seven-year-old waiting for her father; McDermott then leaps ahead, when Marie, pregnant with her first child, recalls collapsing at a deli counter and the narrative plunges us into a world where death is literally just around the corner, upending the safety and comfort of her neighborhood; 'In a few months' time, I would be at death's door, last rites and all,' she relates. We follow Marie through the milestones of her life, shadowed by her elder brother, Gabe, who mysteriously leaves the priesthood for which everyone thought he was destined. The story of Marie's life unfolds in a nonlinear fashion: McDermott describes the loss of Marie's father, her first experience with intimacy, her first job (in a funeral parlor of all places), her marriage, the birth of a child. We come to feel for this unremarkable woman, whose vulnerability makes her all the more winning — and makes her worthy of our attention. And that's why McDermott, a three-time Pulitzer nominee, is such an exceptional writer: in her hands, an uncomplicated life becomes singularly fascinating, revealing the heart of a woman whose defeats make us ache and whose triumphs we cheer. Marie's vision (and ours) eventually clears, and she comes to understand that what she so often failed to see lay right in front of her eyes. Agent: Sarah Burnes, Gernert Company. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

“One of the authors most trenchant explorations into the heart and soul of the 20th-century Irish-American family....Marie's straightforward narration is interrupted with occasional jumps back and forward in time that create both a sense of foreboding and continuity as well as a mediation on the nature of sorrow....Marie and Gabe are compelling in their basic goodness, as is McDermott's elegy to a vanished world.” Kirkus

Review:

“Readers who love refined, unhurried, emotionally fluent fiction will rejoice at National Book Award-winner McDermott's return. McDermott...is a master of hidden intensities, intricate textures, spiked dialogue, and sparkling wit. We first meet Marie at age seven, when shes sitting on the stoop in her tight-knit, Irish-Catholic Brooklyn neighborhood, waiting for her father to come home from work. Down the street, boys play stickball, consulting with dapper Billy, their blind umpire, an injured WWI vet. Tragedies and scandals surge through the enclave, providing rough initiations into sex and death....A marvel of subtle modulations, McDermott's keenly observed, fluently humane, quietly enthralling novel of conformity and selfhood, of ‘lace-curtain pretensions' as shield and camouflage, celebrates family, community, and ‘the grace of a shared past.'” Donna Seaman, Booklist (starred)

Review:

[Someone] has something of the quality of a slide show....Each slide, each scene, from the ostensibly inconsequential to the clearly momentous, is illuminated with equal care. The effect on the reader is of sitting alongside the narrator, sharing the task of sifting the salvaged fragments of her life, watching her puzzle over, rearrange and reconsider them — and at last, but without any particular urgency or certitude, tilting herself in the direction of finally discerning their significance. This is a quiet business, but it's the sense-making we all engage in, the narrative work that allows us to construct a coherent framework for our everyday existence. It's also a serious business, the essential work of an examined life....McDermott's excellence is on ample display here." Leah Hager Cohen, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"One of the great strengths of [Someone] lies in this sense of tenderness and intimacy, of empathy for the human condition....The narrative unfolds slowly, through small moments of beauty and vividness....The moments are small, but packed with complexity and emotion....There are many reasons to write a novel. One — maybe the best — is to bear compassionate witness to what it is to be alive, in this place, this time. This kind of novel is necessary to us. We need to know about other lives: This kind of knowledge expands our understanding, it enlarges our souls. There are differences between us, but there are things we share. Fear and vulnerability, joy and passion, the capacity for love and pain and grief: Those are common to us all. Those are the things that great novelists explore. And it's this exploration, made with tenderness, wisdom and caritas, that's at the heart of Alice McDermott's masterpiece." Roxana Robinson, The Washington Post

Review:

"Just as McDermott manages to write lyrically in plain language, she is able to find the drama in uninflected experience. This is the grand accomplishment of Someone, a deceptively simple book that is, in fact, extraordinarily artful, a novel that traces the arc of an unexceptional, almost anonymous life and, seemingly by accident though of course on purpose, turns a run-of-the-mill story into a poem." Charles McNulty, The Los Angeles Times

Review:

"[Someone is] filled with subtle insights and abundant empathy and grace." USA Today

Review:

"[An] incantatory new novel, in which the landscape of memory is a chiaroscuro in motion and the sightlines are seldom entirely unobstructed....The maudlin and the twee that have tripped up so many others' attempts at Irish-American portraiture are no temptation for McDermott. She does not genuflect, nor does she cling to grievance. She looks with a sharp gaze and a generous spirit, finds multitudes even in a clan's closed air, and tells a clear-eyed, kinder tale." Laura Collins-Hughes, The Boston Globe

About the Author

Alice McDermott is the author of six previous novels, including After This; Child of My Heart; Charming Billy, winner of the 1998 National Book Award; and At Weddings and Wakes, all published by FSG. That Night, At Weddings and Wakes, and After This were all finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. McDermott lives with her family outside Washington, D.C.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

fahmi, November 8, 2013 (view all comments by fahmi)
An exquisite novel of an "unremarkable woman's unforgettable life." Recollecting details from when she was seven-years-old sitting on the stoop of her Brooklyn home to when she's an old woman, Marie Comerford reminds us of how the ordinary people who fill our youth, adolescence and adulthood impact our ordinary existence.

Alice McDermott's novel might appear simplistic at first glance, but it is filled with deep understanding as she turns from one era to the next to portray Marie. Having lived through the same years as Marie and in the same place, the details in this book added to my appreciation and to the recognition of Alice McDermott as a great writer.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
Peggy Arthurs, October 22, 2013 (view all comments by Peggy Arthurs)
And it is my opinion that she is a fine writer! I loved this book. Her writing is lyrical, beautiful to feel in your mouth, or in your ears if listening to an audio version. I was listening to another of her books on audio in the car the same time I was reading this one. Not a good idea! Tough to keep the stories apart.

This story begins in pre-war Brooklyn. I loved the time period, the Irish Catholic families. It starts with Marie at age 7 and goes forward and then back again encompassing her death. Her father is a closet alcoholic, her brother is the favored child, born to be a priest. He's very fragile though. He becomes a priest and within a year has left the priesthood. It's eluded to that he might be homosexual but that story isn't really developed. Although he is the character with the most 'going on' in his life, Ms. McDermott chose to explore shy, plain Marie. Although she is a unremarkable woman on the outside, she has a very active inner life and it is this that McDermott draws out.

I am half way through with her novel And This on audio and I LOVE it. I am going to read all of Ms. McDermott's books. You should too!
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View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374281090
Author:
McDermott, Alice
Publisher:
Farrar Straus Giroux
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
General Fiction
Publication Date:
20130931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb

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Product details 240 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374281090 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this deceptively simple tour de force, McDermott (Charming Billy, winner of the National Book Award) lays bare the keenly observed life of Marie Commeford, an ordinary woman whose compromised eyesight makes her both figuratively and literally unable to see the world for what it is. When we meet her on the steps of her Brooklyn townhouse, she's a bespectacled seven-year-old waiting for her father; McDermott then leaps ahead, when Marie, pregnant with her first child, recalls collapsing at a deli counter and the narrative plunges us into a world where death is literally just around the corner, upending the safety and comfort of her neighborhood; 'In a few months' time, I would be at death's door, last rites and all,' she relates. We follow Marie through the milestones of her life, shadowed by her elder brother, Gabe, who mysteriously leaves the priesthood for which everyone thought he was destined. The story of Marie's life unfolds in a nonlinear fashion: McDermott describes the loss of Marie's father, her first experience with intimacy, her first job (in a funeral parlor of all places), her marriage, the birth of a child. We come to feel for this unremarkable woman, whose vulnerability makes her all the more winning — and makes her worthy of our attention. And that's why McDermott, a three-time Pulitzer nominee, is such an exceptional writer: in her hands, an uncomplicated life becomes singularly fascinating, revealing the heart of a woman whose defeats make us ache and whose triumphs we cheer. Marie's vision (and ours) eventually clears, and she comes to understand that what she so often failed to see lay right in front of her eyes. Agent: Sarah Burnes, Gernert Company. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , “One of the authors most trenchant explorations into the heart and soul of the 20th-century Irish-American family....Marie's straightforward narration is interrupted with occasional jumps back and forward in time that create both a sense of foreboding and continuity as well as a mediation on the nature of sorrow....Marie and Gabe are compelling in their basic goodness, as is McDermott's elegy to a vanished world.”
"Review" by , “Readers who love refined, unhurried, emotionally fluent fiction will rejoice at National Book Award-winner McDermott's return. McDermott...is a master of hidden intensities, intricate textures, spiked dialogue, and sparkling wit. We first meet Marie at age seven, when shes sitting on the stoop in her tight-knit, Irish-Catholic Brooklyn neighborhood, waiting for her father to come home from work. Down the street, boys play stickball, consulting with dapper Billy, their blind umpire, an injured WWI vet. Tragedies and scandals surge through the enclave, providing rough initiations into sex and death....A marvel of subtle modulations, McDermott's keenly observed, fluently humane, quietly enthralling novel of conformity and selfhood, of ‘lace-curtain pretensions' as shield and camouflage, celebrates family, community, and ‘the grace of a shared past.'”
"Review" by , [Someone] has something of the quality of a slide show....Each slide, each scene, from the ostensibly inconsequential to the clearly momentous, is illuminated with equal care. The effect on the reader is of sitting alongside the narrator, sharing the task of sifting the salvaged fragments of her life, watching her puzzle over, rearrange and reconsider them — and at last, but without any particular urgency or certitude, tilting herself in the direction of finally discerning their significance. This is a quiet business, but it's the sense-making we all engage in, the narrative work that allows us to construct a coherent framework for our everyday existence. It's also a serious business, the essential work of an examined life....McDermott's excellence is on ample display here."
"Review" by , "One of the great strengths of [Someone] lies in this sense of tenderness and intimacy, of empathy for the human condition....The narrative unfolds slowly, through small moments of beauty and vividness....The moments are small, but packed with complexity and emotion....There are many reasons to write a novel. One — maybe the best — is to bear compassionate witness to what it is to be alive, in this place, this time. This kind of novel is necessary to us. We need to know about other lives: This kind of knowledge expands our understanding, it enlarges our souls. There are differences between us, but there are things we share. Fear and vulnerability, joy and passion, the capacity for love and pain and grief: Those are common to us all. Those are the things that great novelists explore. And it's this exploration, made with tenderness, wisdom and caritas, that's at the heart of Alice McDermott's masterpiece."
"Review" by , "Just as McDermott manages to write lyrically in plain language, she is able to find the drama in uninflected experience. This is the grand accomplishment of Someone, a deceptively simple book that is, in fact, extraordinarily artful, a novel that traces the arc of an unexceptional, almost anonymous life and, seemingly by accident though of course on purpose, turns a run-of-the-mill story into a poem."
"Review" by , "[Someone is] filled with subtle insights and abundant empathy and grace."
"Review" by , "[An] incantatory new novel, in which the landscape of memory is a chiaroscuro in motion and the sightlines are seldom entirely unobstructed....The maudlin and the twee that have tripped up so many others' attempts at Irish-American portraiture are no temptation for McDermott. She does not genuflect, nor does she cling to grievance. She looks with a sharp gaze and a generous spirit, finds multitudes even in a clan's closed air, and tells a clear-eyed, kinder tale."
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