Signed Edition Sweepstakes
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »

spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

Leveling the Playing Field: How the Law Can Make Sports Better for Fans

Leveling the Playing Field: How the Law Can Make Sports Better for Fans Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The world of sports seems entwined with lawsuits. This is so, Paul Weiler explains, because of two characteristics intrinsic to all competitive sports. First, sporting contests lose their drama if the competition becomes too lopsided. Second, the winning athletes and teams usually take the "lion's share" of both fan attention and spending. So interest in second-rate teams and in second-rate leagues rapidly wanes, leaving one dominant league with monopoly power.

The ideal of evenly balanced sporting contests is continually challenged by economic, social, and technological forces. Consequently, Weiler argues, the law is essential to level the playing field for players, owners, and ultimately fans and taxpayers. For example, he shows why players' use of performance-enhancing drugs, even legal ones, should be treated as a more serious offense than, say, use of cocaine. He also explains why proposals to break up dominant leagues and create new ones will not work, and thus why both union representation of players and legal protection for fans--and taxpayers--are necessary.

Using well-known incidents--and supplying little-known facts--Weiler analyzes a wide array of moral and economic issues that arise in all competitive sports. He tells us, for example, how Commissioner Bud Selig should respond to Pete Rose's quest for admission to the Hall of Fame; what kind of settlement will allow baseball players and owners to avoid a replay of their past labor battles; and how our political leaders should address the recent wave of taxpayer-built stadiums.

Synopsis:

The ideal of evenly balanced sporting contests is continually challenged by economic, social, and technological forces. Consequently, Weiler argues, the law is essential to level the playing field for players, owners, and ultimately fans and taxpayers. Using well-known incidents--and supplying little-known facts--Weiler analyzes a wide array of moral and economic issues that arise in all American competitive sports.

Synopsis:

the recent wave of taxpayer-built stadiums.

About the Author

Paul Weiler is the Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law at Harvard University.

Harvard Law School

Table of Contents

Prologue: Sports on Trial

PART 1: THE INTEGRITY OF SPORTS

1. Misconduct on the Field

2. Honoring Civil Rights in Sports

3. The Deadliest Sin in Sports

4. The Sports War on Drugs

5. Athletes as Role Models

6. The Moral Ideal for American Sports

PART 2: OWNERS VERSUS PLAYERS

7. Show Us the Money

8. Sports Joins the Union

9. Opening the Flood-Gates

10. What Antitrust Did for Players

11. How to Level the Player Field

12. Salary Sharing among Players

PART 3: OWNERS VERSUS OWNERS--AND FANS/B>

13. The Brave New World of Franchise Free Agency

14. How Far Have We Traveled?

15. What the Law Should Do with Raiders

16. Stadium Socialism or a Stadium Cap?

17. Sports in Intellectual Space

18. What Should Leagues Be Like?

19. Expand or Break Up the Big Leagues?

20. A Better World for Fans

Epilogue: A Performance--Enhancing Law for Sports

Acknowledgments

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674006874
Author:
Weiler, Paul C.
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Location:
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Subject:
General
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Sports
Subject:
Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice
Subject:
Law-Legal Guides and Reference
Subject:
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Organizational Behavior
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
December 2001
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
none
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 18 oz

Related Subjects

» History and Social Science » Law » General
» History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference
» Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sports General
» Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sports Writing

Leveling the Playing Field: How the Law Can Make Sports Better for Fans
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 384 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674006874 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The ideal of evenly balanced sporting contests is continually challenged by economic, social, and technological forces. Consequently, Weiler argues, the law is essential to level the playing field for players, owners, and ultimately fans and taxpayers. Using well-known incidents--and supplying little-known facts--Weiler analyzes a wide array of moral and economic issues that arise in all American competitive sports.
"Synopsis" by , the recent wave of taxpayer-built stadiums.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.