Mega Dose
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | September 17, 2014

    Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



    My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.95
Used Hardcover
Usually ships in 5 to 7 business days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
2 Remote Warehouse General- General

More copies of this ISBN

Indecision

by

Indecision Cover

ISBN13: 9781400063451
ISBN10: 1400063450
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 2 left in stock at $9.95!

 

Review-A-Day

"[I]n the end, Indecision is not your father's novel of youthful malaise; Kunkel wants to do more than document the days and nights of the over-privileged and underpaid. He wants to explore the cause and effect of this malaise and, ultimately, its morality. Happily, Indecision, Dwight's "memoir" of his path from Gawker-esque cubicle denizen to passionate idealist, manages to be astonishingly convincing and entertaining at once." Anna Godbersen, Esquire (read the entire Esquire review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Benjamin Kunkel's brilliantly comic debut novel concerns one of the central maladies of our time — a pathological indecision that turns abundance into an affliction and opportunity into a curse.

Dwight B. Wilmerding is only twenty-eight, but he's having a midlife crisis. Of course, living a dissolute, dorm like existence in a tiny apartment and working in tech support at the pharmaceutical giant Pfizer are not especially conducive to wisdom.

And a few sessions of psychoanalysis conducted by his sister have distinctly failed to help with his biggest problem: a chronic inability to make up his mind.

Encouraged by one of his roommates to try an experimental pharmaceutical meant to banish indecision, Dwight jumps at the chance (not without some meditation on the hazards of jumping) and swallows the first fateful pill. And when all at once he is pfired from Pfizer and invited to a rendezvous in exotic Ecuador with the girl of his long-ago prep-school dreams, he finds himself on the brink of a new life.

The trouble — well, one of the troubles — is that Dwight can't decide if the pills are working. Deep in the jungles of the Amazon, in the foreign country of a changed outlook, his would-be romantic escape becomes a hilarious journey into unbidden responsibility and unwelcome knowledge.

How to affirm happiness without living in constant denial of the ways of the world? How to commit, and to what? At once funny and poignant, gentle and outrageous, finely intelligent and proudly silly, Indecision rings with a voice of great energy and originality, while its deeper inquiries reflect the concerns and style of a generation.

Review:

"Dwight Wilmerding, the vacillating, down-market prepster protagonist of Kunkel's debut novel, gets fired from his low-level job at Pfizer and, with the lease running out on his hive-like Chambers Street boys-club apartment, lights out for Quito, Ecuador, where high school flame Natasha is holed up. Before this momentous undertaking, Dwight has been afflicted with chronic postcollegiate indecision, particularly in relationships: should he pursue a life with his quasi-girlfriend, Vaneetha? Start up again with Natasha? And what about his weird thing for his sister, Alice? As luck would have it, one of his roommates is a med student who turns Dwight on to Abulinix, an experimental new treatment for chronic indecision, which makes his South American jaunt very eventful indeed. A subtheme on the post-politicality of post-9/11 20-somethings gives the book some bite and surfaces most conspicuously in the form of Brigid, the Euroactivist who, along with the drug, brings Dwight clarity, and even hope. Annoying but accomplished, this entertaining book has screenplay written all over it, from the hot Dutch Natasha to the shambling cute Dwight — not to mention Harvard-educated, New York — literati Kunkel himself. (Sept. 6)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"If Kunkel ultimately seems to want to move beyond irony and youthful nihilism...he certainly embraces and rides the hell out of them in the beginning, with deeply satisfying results." New York Times

Review:

"Here's what Indecision gives you: sustained social and intellectual comedy, possibly the last but certainly the funniest Superfluous Man in modern literature, drive-by satire, plus detailed set-piece send-ups of Young Adult colgrads at work and play....And there's a surprising ending. Benjamin Kunkel, welcome!" Norman Rush, author of Mating

Review:

"Kunkel may unfairly be compared to David Foster Wallace or Rick Moody, but unlike them he has succeeded in writing a novel that's clever without being self-conscious." Washington Post

Review:

"The tentativeness with which Kunkel approaches [his] fairly radical conclusion may just be an indication of the narrowness of our contemporary literary idiom....[I]t seems to me that Kunkel manages...to preserve the superb comic tone of the novel, even as he gestures...toward a hazy new frontier of hip sincerity, of irony subordinated to a higher calling." Jay McInerney, The New York Times

Review:

"What saves the book from being frivolous...is its humor, which bursts forth in several madcap and welcome scenes." Library Journal

Review:

"Those who don't become impossibly annoyed with the hapless, initially whiny lead will enjoy seeing this well-paced tale through to the end. It isn't high art, but it's full of high spirits." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"In the hapless, charming Dwight Wilmerding, he has created one of those narrators whose voices you can hear in your head long after the book is finished." Nell Freudenberger, author of Lucky Girls

Synopsis:

A young man plagued by chronic indecision is "pfired" by Pfizer and journeys to Ecuador in pursuit of an old flame.

About the Author

Benjamin Kunkel grew up in Colorado. He has written for Dissent, The Nation, and the The New York Review of Books, and is a founding editor of n+1 magazine.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

slickpdx, October 23, 2014 (view all comments by slickpdx)
A neat premise. The first half of the novel is quite witty. The second half feels tacked on. It remained a good read (I devoured it!) but it was a different novel. You know how even most good comedies exchange laughs for plot as the movie rolls on? It was kind of like that. But that doesn't stop me from seeing those comedies and it shouldn't stop anyone from reading this book.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400063451
Author:
Kunkel, Benjamin
Publisher:
Random House
Subject:
General
Subject:
Young men
Subject:
Americans
Publication Date:
August 2005
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.58x6.38x.94 in. 1.05 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. On Beauty: A Novel
    Used Book Club Paperback $2.50
  2. Gilead: A Novel
    Used Hardcover $5.95
  3. Ask Again Later
    Used Trade Paper $5.95
  4. Fever Pitch Used Trade Paper $5.50
  5. Prep: A Novel
    Used Trade Paper $3.50
  6. Look at Me Used Hardcover $9.50

Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Satire

Indecision Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Random House - English 9781400063451 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Dwight Wilmerding, the vacillating, down-market prepster protagonist of Kunkel's debut novel, gets fired from his low-level job at Pfizer and, with the lease running out on his hive-like Chambers Street boys-club apartment, lights out for Quito, Ecuador, where high school flame Natasha is holed up. Before this momentous undertaking, Dwight has been afflicted with chronic postcollegiate indecision, particularly in relationships: should he pursue a life with his quasi-girlfriend, Vaneetha? Start up again with Natasha? And what about his weird thing for his sister, Alice? As luck would have it, one of his roommates is a med student who turns Dwight on to Abulinix, an experimental new treatment for chronic indecision, which makes his South American jaunt very eventful indeed. A subtheme on the post-politicality of post-9/11 20-somethings gives the book some bite and surfaces most conspicuously in the form of Brigid, the Euroactivist who, along with the drug, brings Dwight clarity, and even hope. Annoying but accomplished, this entertaining book has screenplay written all over it, from the hot Dutch Natasha to the shambling cute Dwight — not to mention Harvard-educated, New York — literati Kunkel himself. (Sept. 6)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[I]n the end, Indecision is not your father's novel of youthful malaise; Kunkel wants to do more than document the days and nights of the over-privileged and underpaid. He wants to explore the cause and effect of this malaise and, ultimately, its morality. Happily, Indecision, Dwight's "memoir" of his path from Gawker-esque cubicle denizen to passionate idealist, manages to be astonishingly convincing and entertaining at once." (read the entire Esquire review)
"Review" by , "If Kunkel ultimately seems to want to move beyond irony and youthful nihilism...he certainly embraces and rides the hell out of them in the beginning, with deeply satisfying results."
"Review" by , "Here's what Indecision gives you: sustained social and intellectual comedy, possibly the last but certainly the funniest Superfluous Man in modern literature, drive-by satire, plus detailed set-piece send-ups of Young Adult colgrads at work and play....And there's a surprising ending. Benjamin Kunkel, welcome!"
"Review" by , "Kunkel may unfairly be compared to David Foster Wallace or Rick Moody, but unlike them he has succeeded in writing a novel that's clever without being self-conscious."
"Review" by , "The tentativeness with which Kunkel approaches [his] fairly radical conclusion may just be an indication of the narrowness of our contemporary literary idiom....[I]t seems to me that Kunkel manages...to preserve the superb comic tone of the novel, even as he gestures...toward a hazy new frontier of hip sincerity, of irony subordinated to a higher calling."
"Review" by , "What saves the book from being frivolous...is its humor, which bursts forth in several madcap and welcome scenes."
"Review" by , "Those who don't become impossibly annoyed with the hapless, initially whiny lead will enjoy seeing this well-paced tale through to the end. It isn't high art, but it's full of high spirits."
"Review" by , "In the hapless, charming Dwight Wilmerding, he has created one of those narrators whose voices you can hear in your head long after the book is finished."
"Synopsis" by , A young man plagued by chronic indecision is "pfired" by Pfizer and journeys to Ecuador in pursuit of an old flame.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.