Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 21, 2014

Richard Bausch: IMG Why Literature Can Save Us



Our title is, of course, a problem. "Why Literature Can Save Us." And of course the problem is one of definition: what those words mean. What is... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Before, During, After

    Richard Bausch 9780307266262

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$45.00
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
3 Remote Warehouse Military- Naval History
2 Remote Warehouse Military- General History

More copies of this ISBN

The Command of the Ocean: A Naval History of Britain, 1649-1815

by

The Command of the Ocean: A Naval History of Britain, 1649-1815 Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Rodger's appraisal of logistics and bureaucracy is the most penetrating and skillful I've encountered. Only a writer of verve could make these potentially deadening subjects compelling. It must have been tempting for Rodger to rely solely on his staggering erudition (he cites sources written in a dozen languages) and the sure knowledge that regardless of its literary qualities, his book will be the definitive treatment of its subject for at least a century....But there's not a lazy sentence here, and a keen intelligence propels every paragraph." Benjamin Schwarz, the Atlantic Monthly (read the entire Atlantic Monthly review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Command of the Oceans describes with unprecedented authority and scholarship the rise of Britain to naval greatness, and the central place of the Navy and naval activity in the life of the nation and government. Based on the author's own research in a dozen languages over more than a decade, it describes not just battles, voyages, and cruises but also how the Navy was manned, supplied, fed, and above all, how it was financial and directed.

N. A. M. Rodger provides convincing reassessments of such famous figures as Pepys. Hawkie, Howe, and St. Vincent. The very particular and distinct qualities of Nelson and Collingswood are illuminatingly contrasted, and the world of officers and men who make up the originals of Jack Aubrey and Horatio Hornblower is brilliantly brought to life. Rodger's comparative view of other navies — French, Dutch, Spanish, and American — allows him to make a fresh assessment of the qualities of the British.

Review:

"The adjective 'magisterial' is justified for this colossal second volume of a complete history of British sea power, which began with The Safeguard of the Sea (1998); the author of the classic 18th-century British naval history, The Wooden World, has surpassed himself here. The book opens with the establishment of the Commonwealth in 1649; for its duration there were two British navies, the Commonwealth Navy (which laid the foundations for a professional officer corps and fought the First Dutch War of 1652 — 1654) and a semipiratical Royalist Navy-in-Exile. After the Restoration, we quickly find the diarist Samuel Pepys exercising less literary but more permanent influence as secretary (or chief administrative officer) of the admiralty. The book offers colossal amounts of information (organized sometimes thematically, sometimes chronologically) right through to its endpoint of 1815, accompanied by a formidable set of notes and bibliography, as well as 24 pages of illustrations. The author not only avoids a hagiography of famous admirals but displays psychological insight in his portraits of, for example, the trio of Lord St. Vincent, his protg Nelson and Nelson's indispensable second, Collingwood. Rodger also demonstrates a firm grasp of the relationship of technical subjects (the amount of tar caulking a ship needed) to British strategy (keeping the Baltic sources of tar accessible). Readers without an intense interest in the subject may be daunted; readers without some background knowledge in British social history may be somewhat at sea in the author's discussion of the officer corps and the recruitment of sailors (usually through the press-gang). Serious students of naval history, however, will find this absolutely indispensable; this is the place to find out whence the navy of Jack Aubrey and Horatio Hornblower came. Agent, Peter Robinson at Curtin Brown (London)." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Rodger again combines high academic scholarship with a lively narrative that explains how the political and social history of Britain has been inextricably intertwined with the strengths and weaknesses of her sea power." Library Journal

Synopsis:

An Best Book of 2004: "Destined to remain the reference on the subject for the coming generations."--U.S. Naval Institute

Synopsis:

As Mr. Rodger demonstrates on almost every page, if you do not understand the importance of British maritime history, you can never fully understand Britain.Rodger illuminates the world of Nelson and Hardy and its portrayal by C. F. Forrester in the Hornblower novels and Patrick O’Brian in the Aubrey and Maturin cycle . . . to understand the Royal Navy at its peak, Rodger’s account is indispensable

Synopsis:

The Command of the Ocean describes with unprecedented authority and scholarship the rise of Britain to naval greatness, and the central place of the Navy and naval activity in the life of the nation and government. Based on the author's own research in a dozen languages over more than a decade, it describes not just battles, voyages, and cruises but also how the Navy was manned, supplied, fed, and, above all, how it was financed and directed.

N. A. M. Rodger provides convincing reassessments of such famous figures as Pepys, Hawke, Howe, and St. Vincent. The very particular and distinct qualities of Nelson and Collingwood are illuminatingly contrasted, and the world of officers and men who make up the originals of Jack Aubrey and Horatio Hornblower is brilliantly brought to life. Rodger's comparative view of other navies--French, Dutch, Spanish, and American--allows him to make a fresh assessment of the qualities of the British.

About the Author

is professor of naval history at Exeter University and a fellow of the British Academy. He is the author of and the highly acclaimed volumes of his naval history of Britain, and . He lives in England.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393060508
Author:
Rodger, N. A. M.
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Rodger, N. A. M.
Subject:
Military - Naval
Subject:
Maritime History
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain - General
Subject:
Military-Naval History
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20050431
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
24 pages of illustrations
Pages:
976
Dimensions:
9.6 x 6.5 x 2 in 3.06 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed... Used Trade Paper $8.50
  2. Unit 731: Testimony New Trade Paper $12.95
  3. Lake Monster Mysteries:... New Hardcover $24.95
  4. Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the...
    Used Trade Paper $6.50
  5. Jefferson & His Time #02: Jefferson... New Trade Paper $26.25
  6. On Bullshit
    Used Hardcover $5.50

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Military » Naval History
History and Social Science » World History » England » General

The Command of the Ocean: A Naval History of Britain, 1649-1815 New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$45.00 In Stock
Product details 976 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393060508 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The adjective 'magisterial' is justified for this colossal second volume of a complete history of British sea power, which began with The Safeguard of the Sea (1998); the author of the classic 18th-century British naval history, The Wooden World, has surpassed himself here. The book opens with the establishment of the Commonwealth in 1649; for its duration there were two British navies, the Commonwealth Navy (which laid the foundations for a professional officer corps and fought the First Dutch War of 1652 — 1654) and a semipiratical Royalist Navy-in-Exile. After the Restoration, we quickly find the diarist Samuel Pepys exercising less literary but more permanent influence as secretary (or chief administrative officer) of the admiralty. The book offers colossal amounts of information (organized sometimes thematically, sometimes chronologically) right through to its endpoint of 1815, accompanied by a formidable set of notes and bibliography, as well as 24 pages of illustrations. The author not only avoids a hagiography of famous admirals but displays psychological insight in his portraits of, for example, the trio of Lord St. Vincent, his protg Nelson and Nelson's indispensable second, Collingwood. Rodger also demonstrates a firm grasp of the relationship of technical subjects (the amount of tar caulking a ship needed) to British strategy (keeping the Baltic sources of tar accessible). Readers without an intense interest in the subject may be daunted; readers without some background knowledge in British social history may be somewhat at sea in the author's discussion of the officer corps and the recruitment of sailors (usually through the press-gang). Serious students of naval history, however, will find this absolutely indispensable; this is the place to find out whence the navy of Jack Aubrey and Horatio Hornblower came. Agent, Peter Robinson at Curtin Brown (London)." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Rodger's appraisal of logistics and bureaucracy is the most penetrating and skillful I've encountered. Only a writer of verve could make these potentially deadening subjects compelling. It must have been tempting for Rodger to rely solely on his staggering erudition (he cites sources written in a dozen languages) and the sure knowledge that regardless of its literary qualities, his book will be the definitive treatment of its subject for at least a century....But there's not a lazy sentence here, and a keen intelligence propels every paragraph." (read the entire Atlantic Monthly review)
"Review" by , "Rodger again combines high academic scholarship with a lively narrative that explains how the political and social history of Britain has been inextricably intertwined with the strengths and weaknesses of her sea power."
"Synopsis" by , An Best Book of 2004: "Destined to remain the reference on the subject for the coming generations."--U.S. Naval Institute
"Synopsis" by , As Mr. Rodger demonstrates on almost every page, if you do not understand the importance of British maritime history, you can never fully understand Britain.Rodger illuminates the world of Nelson and Hardy and its portrayal by C. F. Forrester in the Hornblower novels and Patrick O’Brian in the Aubrey and Maturin cycle . . . to understand the Royal Navy at its peak, Rodger’s account is indispensable
"Synopsis" by , The Command of the Ocean describes with unprecedented authority and scholarship the rise of Britain to naval greatness, and the central place of the Navy and naval activity in the life of the nation and government. Based on the author's own research in a dozen languages over more than a decade, it describes not just battles, voyages, and cruises but also how the Navy was manned, supplied, fed, and, above all, how it was financed and directed.

N. A. M. Rodger provides convincing reassessments of such famous figures as Pepys, Hawke, Howe, and St. Vincent. The very particular and distinct qualities of Nelson and Collingwood are illuminatingly contrasted, and the world of officers and men who make up the originals of Jack Aubrey and Horatio Hornblower is brilliantly brought to life. Rodger's comparative view of other navies--French, Dutch, Spanish, and American--allows him to make a fresh assessment of the qualities of the British.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.