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Other titles in the Coretta Scott King Award - Author Winner Title series:

P.S. Be Eleven

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P.S. Be Eleven Cover

ISBN13: 9780061938627
ISBN10: 0061938629
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this Coretta Scott King Award-winning novel and sequel to the New York Times bestseller and Newbery Honor Book One Crazy Summer, the Gaither sisters return to Brooklyn and find that changes large and small have come to their home. This extraordinary novel earned five starred reviews, with Publishers Weekly calling it "historical fiction that's as full of heart as it is of heartbreak" and The Horn Book considering it "funny, wise, poignant, and thought-provoking."

After spending the summer in Oakland, California, with their mother and the Black Panthers, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern arrive home with a newfound streak of independence. The sisters aren't the only ones who have changed. Now Pa has a girlfriend. Uncle Darnell returns from Vietnam a different man. But Big Ma still expects Delphine to keep her sisters in line. That's much harder now that Vonetta and Fern refuse to be bossed around. Besides her sisters, Delphine's got plenty of other things to worry about—like starting sixth grade, being the tallest girl in her class, and dreading the upcoming school dance. The one person she confides in is her mother, Cecile. Through letters, Delphine pours her heart out and receives some constant advice: to be eleven while she can.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Review:

"Delphine and her sisters return to Brooklyn from visiting their estranged mother, Cecile, a poet who sent them off every day to a camp run by the Black Panthers in Williams-Garcia's Newbery Honor — winning One Crazy Summer. It wasn't the California vacation they expected, but the experience rocked their world. Big Ma, their grandmother, is no longer just a stern taskmaster, she's an oppressor. Delphine, who again narrates, loses interest in magazines like Tiger Beat and Seventeen: 'When there's Afros and black faces on the cover, I'll buy one,' she tells a storeowner. Reflecting society at large in 1968, change and conflict have the Gaither household in upheaval: Pa has a new girlfriend, Uncle Darnell returns from Vietnam a damaged young man, and the sixth-grade teacher Delphine hoped to get has been replaced by a man from Zambia. Though the plot involves more quotidian events than the first book, the Gaither sisters are an irresistible trio. Williams-Garcia excels at conveying defining moments of American society from their point of view — this is historical fiction that's as full of heart as it is of heartbreak. Ages 8 — 12. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Things are changing in the Gaither household. After soaking up a "power to the people" mind-set over the summer, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern return to Brooklyn with a newfound streak of independence. Pa has a girlfriend. Uncle Darnell is home from Vietnam, but he's not the same. And a new singing group called the Jackson Five has the girls seeing stars.

But the one thing that doesn't change? Big Ma still expects Delphine to keep everything together. That's even harder now that her sisters refuse to be bossed around, and now that Pa's girlfriend voices her own opinions about things. Through letters, Delphine confides in her mother, who reminds her not to grow up too fast. To be eleven while she can.

An outstanding successor to the Newbery Honor Book One Crazy Summer, P.S. Be Eleven stands on its own as a moving, funny story of three sisters growing up amid the radical change of the 1960s, beautifully written by the inimitable Rita Williams-Garcia.

Synopsis:

Rita Williams-Garcia's much-anticipated middle-grade novel P.S. Be Eleven, winner of Coretta Scott King Award, is the sequel to her New York Times bestseller One Crazy Summer, a Newbery Honor Book and winner of the Coretta Scott King Award.

Eleven-year-old Brooklyn girl Delphine feels overwhelmed with worries and responsibilities. She's just started sixth grade and is self-conscious about being the tallest girl in the class, and nervous about her first school dance. She's supposed to be watching her sisters, but Fern and Vonetta are hard to control. Her uncle Darnell is home from Vietnam and seems different. And her pa has a girlfriend. At least Delphine can write to her mother in Oakland, California, for advice. But why does her mother tell her to "be eleven" when Delphine is now twelve?

The historical novel, set in the 1960s, features vivid characters, insight into family relationships, and a strong sense of place.

About the Author

Winner of the PEN/Norma Klein Award, Rita Williams-Garcia is the author of five other distinguished novels for young adults: Blue Tights, Every Time a Rainbow Dies, Fast Talk on a Slow Track, Like Sisters on the Homefront, and No Laughter Here, the latter four of which were chosen as ALA Best Books for Young Adults. Like Sisters on the Homefront was also named a Coretta Scott King Honor Book and a best book of the year by ALA Booklist, School Library Journal, The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, and Publishers Weekly. She has also written an acclaimed novel for middle-grade readers, One Crazy Summer, which the New York Times called "a powerful and affecting story of sisterhood and motherhood."

Rita Williams-Garcia is currently a faculty member at the Vermont College of Fine Arts in the Writing for Children and Young Adults Program. She has two daughters, Michelle and Stephanie, and lives in Jamaica, New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Beverly B, August 3, 2013 (view all comments by Beverly B)
Delphine and her sisters return to Brooklyn and discover they are not the only ones who are on a new path in this sequel to the outstanding One Crazy Summer. After spending the summer with her eccentric mother and attending the Black Panthers summer school in Oakland, Delphine knew she would have trouble adjusting to her normal life. She did not expect "normal" to have changed so much in two months. All of the changes have Delphine floundering. Delphine's confusion, frustrations and fears are poignantly and powerfully described. Seamlessly infused with Delphine's adolescent point of view is the political and social turmoil of 1968. Pa, who hasn't dated in seven years, has a hip feminist girlfriend. Beloved Uncle Darnel has returned from Vietnam but his zeal for life, his humor and his joy seem to have been left in Asia. Delphine's favorite teacher has been replaced with a new teacher from Africa. He doesn't seem to recognize Delphine's usual role as an academic leader, and he makes her do research to find out the answers to her questions herself. And the Jackson Five are everywhere - - the radio, the covers of magazines, billboards and prime time TV. Delphine's younger sisters have gladly taken on several of Delphine's responsibilities, so they can earn money to go see the Jackson Five at Madison Square Garden. Feeling she has no one to talk in Brooklyn about her unhappiness with all of the changes, Delphine begins writing to her mother in Oakland. The letters her mother writes back are beautiful and wise, though they rarely contain the words Delphine hopes to see. P. S. Be Eleven is a realistic, poetic coming of age story that captures the insecurity of adolescence and the insecurity of the times.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780061938627
Author:
Williams Garcia, Rita
Publisher:
Amistad Press
Author:
Williams-Garcia, Rita
Subject:
Family - Multigenerational
Subject:
Children s-Reference Family and Genealogy
Subject:
Children s-Historical Fiction-U.S. 20th Century
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20130531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 3 up to 7
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 x 0.97 in 13.2 oz
Age Level:
from 8 up to 12

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Related Subjects

Children's » Awards » Coretta Scott King Award Winners
Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 20th Century
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Reference » Family and Genealogy
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Prejudice and Racism

P.S. Be Eleven New Hardcover
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Product details 288 pages Amistad Press - English 9780061938627 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Delphine and her sisters return to Brooklyn from visiting their estranged mother, Cecile, a poet who sent them off every day to a camp run by the Black Panthers in Williams-Garcia's Newbery Honor — winning One Crazy Summer. It wasn't the California vacation they expected, but the experience rocked their world. Big Ma, their grandmother, is no longer just a stern taskmaster, she's an oppressor. Delphine, who again narrates, loses interest in magazines like Tiger Beat and Seventeen: 'When there's Afros and black faces on the cover, I'll buy one,' she tells a storeowner. Reflecting society at large in 1968, change and conflict have the Gaither household in upheaval: Pa has a new girlfriend, Uncle Darnell returns from Vietnam a damaged young man, and the sixth-grade teacher Delphine hoped to get has been replaced by a man from Zambia. Though the plot involves more quotidian events than the first book, the Gaither sisters are an irresistible trio. Williams-Garcia excels at conveying defining moments of American society from their point of view — this is historical fiction that's as full of heart as it is of heartbreak. Ages 8 — 12. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Things are changing in the Gaither household. After soaking up a "power to the people" mind-set over the summer, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern return to Brooklyn with a newfound streak of independence. Pa has a girlfriend. Uncle Darnell is home from Vietnam, but he's not the same. And a new singing group called the Jackson Five has the girls seeing stars.

But the one thing that doesn't change? Big Ma still expects Delphine to keep everything together. That's even harder now that her sisters refuse to be bossed around, and now that Pa's girlfriend voices her own opinions about things. Through letters, Delphine confides in her mother, who reminds her not to grow up too fast. To be eleven while she can.

An outstanding successor to the Newbery Honor Book One Crazy Summer, P.S. Be Eleven stands on its own as a moving, funny story of three sisters growing up amid the radical change of the 1960s, beautifully written by the inimitable Rita Williams-Garcia.

"Synopsis" by , Rita Williams-Garcia's much-anticipated middle-grade novel P.S. Be Eleven, winner of Coretta Scott King Award, is the sequel to her New York Times bestseller One Crazy Summer, a Newbery Honor Book and winner of the Coretta Scott King Award.

Eleven-year-old Brooklyn girl Delphine feels overwhelmed with worries and responsibilities. She's just started sixth grade and is self-conscious about being the tallest girl in the class, and nervous about her first school dance. She's supposed to be watching her sisters, but Fern and Vonetta are hard to control. Her uncle Darnell is home from Vietnam and seems different. And her pa has a girlfriend. At least Delphine can write to her mother in Oakland, California, for advice. But why does her mother tell her to "be eleven" when Delphine is now twelve?

The historical novel, set in the 1960s, features vivid characters, insight into family relationships, and a strong sense of place.

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